1

Im testing a publish method on a pub sub class. I am creating a callback function within the beforeEach function and subscribing to the class. In the it method I am publishing the event and attempting to test that the callback was called which is basically how the class works. I have got the test working and it passes but the problem is I had to use a setTimeout to get this to work. I believe this is probably not the right way to do this.

describe('publish', () => {
  let testpublish;
  let callback;

  beforeEach(() => {
    callback = function(data) { return data + 10; }
    testpublish = {
      'id': 'testpublish1',
      'event': 'testpublish',
      'callback': callback
    };
    subject.subscribe(testpublish);
  });

  it('should call the subscription function', () => {
    subject.publish('testpublish', 9);
    setTimeout(() => {
      expect(callback).toEqual(19);
    });
  });
});

I initially wanted to spy on the callback just to see if it was called but the documentation for Jasmine says I must place my method in an object:

spyOn(obj, methodName) → {Spy}

Any advice on a better way to do this would be appreciated. Thanks.

PubSub Class if useful ??

@Injectable()
export class Pubsub {
  private events: any = {};

  public subscribe(config: any) {
    let event = config['event'];
    this.events[event] = this.events[event] || [];

    if (this.events[event].length < 1) {
      this.events[event].push(config);
    } else {
      for (let i = 0; i < this.events[event].length; i++) {
        if (this.events[event][i].id !== config.id) {
          this.events[event].push(config);
        }
      }
    }
  }

  public unsubscribe(obj: Object) {
    let event = obj['event'];
    let id = obj['id'];

    if (this.events[event]) {
      this.events[event] = this.events[event].filter((eventObj) => {
        return eventObj.id !== id;
      });
    }

    if (this.events[event].length === 0) {
      delete this.events[event];
    }
  }

  public publish(event: string, data: any) {
    if (this.events[event]) {
      this.events[event].forEach(function(obj) {
        obj.callback(data);
      });
    }
  }

  public getEvents() {
    return this.events;
  }
}
0

Existing function cannot be spied, because a spy is a new function, and the reference to original function is already used in the place where it is being called.

Considering that callback function is defined in the test itself, not inside the application, it should be defined as a spy in the first place:

callback = jasmine.createSpy();

It doesn't even have to do something because its return value doesn't add value to the test.

And it is tested like

const arg = {};
subject.publish('testpublish', arg);

expect(callback.calls.count()).toBe(1);
expect(callback.calls.first().args[0]).toBe(arg);

publish is synchronous, as well the rest of the class. There's no need for setTimeout, and it is harmful here. When done parameter isn't specified for the test, it is considered synchronous, and setTimeout makes assertions ignored in this test.

This

  it('should pass', () => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      expect(1).toBe(2);
    });
  });

will always pass. And only if if the suite has no other tests, this will trigger SPEC HAS NO EXPECTATIONS warning.

  • Thank you. I appreciate the detailed explanation and also pointing out the other mistakes I was making in my code. – Aaron Apr 27 '17 at 11:08
  • You're welcome. – Estus Flask Apr 27 '17 at 13:21
0

jasmine.createSpy('spy') will do work.

 describe('publish', () => {
  let testpublish;
  let callback;
  let subject = new Pubsub();

  beforeEach(() => {

    callback = function (data) {
      return data + 10;
    }
    testpublish = {
      'id': 'testpublish1',
      'event': 'testpublish',
      'callback': jasmine.createSpy('spy')
    };
    subject.subscribe(testpublish);
  });

  it('should call the subscription function', () => {
    subject.publish('testpublish', 9);
    expect(testpublish.callback).toHaveBeenCalledWith(9);
  });
});
  • Thank you for the response. I awarded the answer to the second response as it not only answered my question but clarified other mistakes I was making in my code. I appreciate your response. – Aaron Apr 27 '17 at 11:07
  • sure. it is. howevere "expect(callback.calls.first().args[0]).toBe(arg);" is much harder to read than "expect(testpublish.callback).toHaveBeenCalledWith(9);" – Julia Passynkova Apr 27 '17 at 11:10
  • Yes I agree with you. The part that I was referring to is when he pointed out the lack of value to the test when I was adding up values in the stub. Also I feel the detailed explanation might help others who might make the same mistakes as I. It was difficult for me to award the answer to him because you did respond first. Thank you again. – Aaron Apr 27 '17 at 11:15
  • @JuliaPassynkova It is surely easier to read. But notice that expect(callback.calls.first().args[0]).toBe(arg) tests that a callback was called with exact same object - something you cannot do with toHaveBeenCalledWith. See for example groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/jasmine-js/XX80BvJzQYw – Estus Flask Apr 27 '17 at 13:26
  • Yes I see that. This was a really good learning experience. – Aaron Apr 27 '17 at 21:53

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