Unfortunately I'm unable to get a working toolchain to compile C/C++ down to a wasm file, but I was hoping a kind soul could help me out here. Given the program fragment:

struct foo {
    int a;
    float b;
};

void function(foo * p);

void my_program() {
    struct foo my_foo;
    my_foo.a = 1;
    my_foo.b = -3.0F;
    foo(&my_foo);
}

what does the wasm code for my_program look like?

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm going to assume you mean what does the wast textual format look like?

I adjusted up a couple things in your code so that it would compile:

struct foo {
    int a;
    float b;
};

extern void bar(struct foo * p);

void my_program() {
    struct foo my_foo;
    my_foo.a = 1;
    my_foo.b = -3.0F;
    bar(&my_foo);
} 

Compiling it using emscripten/binaryen and then using wasm2wast:

emcc -s WASM=1 -s SIDE_MODULE=1 -O2 str.c -o str.js
wasm-dis str.wasm -o str.wast

Note that without -s SIDE_MODULE=1 -O2, emscripten pulls in a bunch of the standard library (malloc, etc) and the wast file is 10,000 lines long. I'm assuming you probably just want the fairly simple wasm/wast result without all the linkages/inclusions.

That results in the following wast file:

(module
 (type $0 (func (param i32)))
 (type $1 (func))
 (import "env" "memoryBase" (global $import$0 i32))
 (import "env" "_bar" (func $import$1 (param i32)))
 (import "env" "memory" (memory $0 256))
 (import "env" "table" (table 0 anyfunc))
 (import "env" "tableBase" (global $import$4 i32))
 (global $global$0 (mut i32) (i32.const 0))
 (global $global$1 (mut i32) (i32.const 0))
 (export "_my_program" (func $0))
 (export "__post_instantiate" (func $2))
 (export "runPostSets" (func $1))
 (func $0 (type $1)
  (local $var$0 i32)
  (local $var$1 i32)
  (block $label$0
   (set_local $var$0
    (get_global $global$0)
   )
   (set_global $global$0
    (i32.add
     (get_global $global$0)
     (i32.const 16)
    )
   )
   (i32.store
    (tee_local $var$1
     (get_local $var$0)
    )
    (i32.const 1)
   )
   (f32.store offset=4
    (get_local $var$1)
    (f32.const -3)
   )
   (call $import$1
    (get_local $var$1)
   )
   (set_global $global$0
    (get_local $var$0)
   )
  )
 )
 (func $1 (type $1)
  (nop)
 )
 (func $2 (type $1)
  (block $label$0
   (set_global $global$0
    (get_global $import$0)
   )
   (set_global $global$1
    (i32.add
     (get_global $global$0)
     (i32.const 5242880)
    )
   )
   (call $1)
  )
 )
 ;; custom section "dylink", size 5
)

Note that memoryBase, tableBase, __post_instantiate, and runPostSetsare emscripten additions for platform memory integration/initialization. memoryBase is basically the start of the C stack and the value is copied by __post_instantiate into $global$0 (which is global to all functions in this module). When my_program is called the first thing that happens is we adjust the stack pointer by 16 to point to where the compiler has "allocated" space for my_foo structure on stack. We now do a couple of i32.store operations using offset=X to update the fields within foo. When the function returns we restore the stack pointer ($global$0) to where it was when we entered the function.

  • What I'm trying to understand is how local storage is allocated to provide space for the struct. It seems that global 2 is acting like some sort of explicit stack pointer; it's copied into local 0, incremented by 16 (sizeof foo) and on procedure exit, it's reset back to the value in local 0. Would it be correct to assume that the environment provides the "stack pointer" as a global pointer? – John Källén Apr 27 '17 at 16:32
  • @JohnKällén Yes, that's my understanding. I updated the wast using wasm-dis from binaryen since it has more intelligent disassembly and more annotations. I also added some explanatory text for the code explaining that. – kanaka Apr 27 '17 at 18:36

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