4

Suppose I have a List of some entities in Java like

List<Entity> entities = Arrays.asList(entity1, entity2, entity3...);

I would like to reduce it into one instance of a chain object like:

class EntityChain {
    private final Entity entity;
    private final Optional<EntityChain> fallback;

    private EntityChain(Builder builder) {
        this.entity = builder.entity;
        this.fallback = builder.fallback;
    }

    public static Builder builder() {
        return new Builder();
    }

    public static final class Builder {
        private Entity entity;
        private Optional<EntityChain> fallback = Optional.empty();           

        public Builder withEntity(Entity entity) {
            this.entity = entity;
            return this;
        }

        public Builder withFallback(EntityChain fallback) {
            this.fallback = Optional.of(fallback);
            return this;
        }

        public EntityChain build() {
            return new EntityChain(this);
        }
    }
}

EntityChain is immutable and has a builder.
So that the result would be an EntityChain instance like:

chain
   -> entity = entity1
   -> fallback
        -> entity = entity2
        -> fallback
            -> entity = entity3
            -> fallback
                ...

Is it possible to do this with some magic Java 8 fluent reduction?
Is

Stream.reduce(U identity,
              BiFunction<U, ? super T, U> accumulator,
              BinaryOperator<U> combiner)

applicable here? Using somehow it's builder?

  • You didn't mention the builder methods for adding information from which the chain will be built. – RealSkeptic Apr 27 '17 at 12:01
  • @RealSkeptic updated example (to complete class with builder methods) – kornisb Apr 27 '17 at 12:35
  • I'm sorry, I don't see the use of such chain. Wouldn't you rather need an Optional<Entity> being the first non-null entity of your list ? Or is you list a List<Supplier<Entity>> and the chain having two suppliers : the primary returning the entity and the fallback returning another chain ? EDIT : Ah, I understand now, you want to supply entities in an ordered fashion in order to have fallbacks in case of the first one(s) not validating some predicate. – Jeremy Grand Apr 27 '17 at 12:38
2

after thinking, I found I can remove the holder Supplier<EntityChain> completely when reducing in sequentially stream. the algorithm is build the entity chain reversed: first building entity(n) , then entity(n-1), ... entity(0).

BiFunction<EntityChain, Entity, EntityChain> reducing =
    (next, entity) -> Optional.ofNullable(next)
                    // create a builder with fallback if EntityChain present
                    .map(fallback -> EntityChain.builder().withFallback(fallback))
                    // create a builder without fallback
                    .orElseGet(EntityChain::builder)
                    //build the EntityChain
                    .withEntity(entity).build();

// combiner never be used in sequentially stream
BinaryOperator<EntityChain> rejectedInParallelStream = (t1, t2) -> {
    //when you use parallel the chain order maybe changed, and the result is wrong.
    throw new IllegalStateException("Can't be used in parallel stream!");
};


EntityChain chain = reverse(entities).
        stream().reduce(null, reducing, rejectedInParallelStream);


//copy & reverse the copied List
static <T> List<T> reverse(List<T> list) {
    List<T> it = list.stream().collect(Collectors.toList());
    Collections.reverse(it);
    return it;
}

Output

-> entity = entity1
-> fallback
    -> entity = entity2
    -> fallback (empty)
|improve this answer|||||
1

You can do it by lazying build the EntityChain when needed. I use Supplier<EntityChain> done it.

BiFunction<Supplier<EntityChain>, Entity, Supplier<EntityChain>> reducing =
    (initializer, entity) ->
            // get the EntityChain instance when get() called.
            () -> Optional.ofNullable(initializer.get())
                    // create a builder with fallback if EntityChain present
                    .map(fallback -> EntityChain.builder().withFallback(fallback))
                    // create a builder without fallback
                    .orElseGet(EntityChain::builder)
                    //build the EntityChain
                    .withEntity(entity).build();

// combiner never be used in sequentially stream
BinaryOperator<Supplier<EntityChain>> rejectedInParallelStream = (t1, t2) -> {
    throw new IllegalStateException("Can't be used in parallel stream!");
};

EntityChain chain = reverse(entities).
        stream().reduce(() -> null, reducing, rejectedInParallelStream)
        //when the initializer chain built/reduced,
        //calling the get() to fetch EntityChain header
        .get();

//copy & reverse the copied List
static <T> List<T> reverse(List<T> list) {
    List<T> it = list.stream().collect(Collectors.toList());
    Collections.reverse(it);
    return it;
}

Output

-> entity = entity1
-> fallback
    -> entity = entity2
    -> fallback (empty)
|improve this answer|||||
  • You use List<T> it = list.stream().collect(Collectors.toList()); just to create a copy, right? – f1sh Apr 27 '17 at 13:45
  • @f1sh it is not just copy but also reverse the list and not effecting on the original list. – holi-java Apr 27 '17 at 13:46
  • that one one doesnt reverse anything. Here's a reversal without streams while not affecting the original list: Collections.reverse(new ArrayList<>(list)); – f1sh Apr 27 '17 at 13:51
  • @f1sh yes, but I used stream instead of new ArrayList. I'm sorry I haven't seen all the comment above. – holi-java Apr 27 '17 at 13:53
0

In order to reduce the list to a builder, you need an accumulator (Builder::withEntity) and a combiner (Builder::combine):

public class ChainBuilder {

  public static class Entity {
    int data;
    public Entity(int i) {
      data = i;
    }
    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "Entity [data=" + data + "]";
    }
  }

  public static class EntityChain {
    private Entity entity;
    private Optional<EntityChain> fallback = null;

    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "EntityChain [entity=" + entity + ", fallback=" + fallback + "]";
    }

    public static class Builder {
      private EntityChain chain = null;

      public Builder() { }

      private static EntityChain newChainLink(Entity e){
        EntityChain n = new EntityChain();
        n.entity = e;
        n.fallback = Optional.empty();
        return n;
      }

      /** accumulator, attaches to the end of the chain */
      public Builder withEntity(Entity e) {
        if(chain == null) {
          chain = newChainLink(e);
        } else {
          EntityChain last = getLast();
          last.fallback = Optional.of(newChainLink(e));
        }
        return this;
      }

      /** combiner, glues two chains together */
      public Builder combine(Builder u) {
        if(u.chain != null) {
          getLast().fallback = Optional.of(u.chain);
        }
        return this;
      }


      /** returns the end of the chain */
      private EntityChain getLast() {
        EntityChain link = chain;
        while(link.fallback.isPresent()){
          link = link.fallback.get();
        }
        return link;
      }

      public EntityChain build() {
        return chain;
      }

    }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Entity> entities = Arrays.asList(new Entity(1), new Entity(2), new Entity(3));
    final Builder reduced = entities.stream().reduce(new EntityChain.Builder(),
                                                     (t,u)->t.withEntity(u),
                                                     (t,u)->t.combine(u));
    System.out.println(reduced.build());
  }
}

This prints:

EntityChain [entity=Entity [data=1], fallback=Optional[EntityChain [entity=Entity [data=2], fallback=Optional[EntityChain [entity=Entity [data=3], fallback=Optional.empty]]]]]

|improve this answer|||||
  • Hi, you changed the structure of OP's. – holi-java Apr 27 '17 at 13:45
  • That is correct. I didn't see any use of a builder for two fields. For each fallback you would need a new instance of builder. – f1sh Apr 27 '17 at 13:49
  • the OP not provided methods in Builder class, so I just used a holder to build the EntityChain, and a holder not a builder. – holi-java Apr 27 '17 at 13:57
  • Thanks @f1sh that works also, but I need the original structure of the EntityChain - even if there is no point to use a builder when there is only two fields in my class. – kornisb Apr 27 '17 at 14:31

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