31

I'm currently trying to improve the way our projects share their configuration. We have lots of different multi-module gradle projects for all of our libraries and microservices (i.e. many git repos).

My main goals are:

  • To not have my Nexus repository config duplicated in every project (also, I can safely assume that the URL won't change)
  • To make my custom Gradle plugins (published to Nexus) available to every project with minimal boilerplate / duplication (they should be available to every project, and the only thing the project cares about is the version it's using)
  • No magic - it should be obvious to developers how everything is configured

My current solution is a custom gradle distribution with an init script that:

  • adds mavenLocal() and our Nexus repository to the project repos (very similar to the Gradle init script documentation example, except it adds repos as well as validating them)
  • configures an extension that allows our gradle plugins to be added to the buildscript classpath (using this workaround). It also adds our Nexus repo as a buildscript repo as that's where the plugins are hosted. We have quite a few plugins (built upon Netflix's excellent nebula plugins) for various boilerplate: standard project setup (kotlin setup, test setup, etc), releasing, publishing, documentation, etc and it means our project build.gradle files are pretty much just for dependencies.

Here is the init script (sanitised):

/**
 * Gradle extension applied to all projects to allow automatic configuration of Corporate plugins.
 */
class CorporatePlugins {

    public static final String NEXUS_URL = "https://example.com/repository/maven-public"
    public static final String CORPORATE_PLUGINS = "com.example:corporate-gradle-plugins"

    def buildscript

    CorporatePlugins(buildscript) {
        this.buildscript = buildscript
    }

    void version(String corporatePluginsVersion) {
        buildscript.repositories {
            maven {
                url NEXUS_URL
            }
        }
        buildscript.dependencies {
            classpath "$CORPORATE_PLUGINS:$corporatePluginsVersion"
        }
    }

}

allprojects {
    extensions.create('corporatePlugins', CorporatePlugins, buildscript)
}

apply plugin: CorporateInitPlugin

class CorporateInitPlugin implements Plugin<Gradle> {

    void apply(Gradle gradle) {

        gradle.allprojects { project ->

            project.repositories {
                all { ArtifactRepository repo ->
                    if (!(repo instanceof MavenArtifactRepository)) {
                        project.logger.warn "Non-maven repository ${repo.name} detected in project ${project.name}. What are you doing???"
                    } else if(repo.url.toString() == CorporatePlugins.NEXUS_URL || repo.name == "MavenLocal") {
                        // Nexus and local maven are good!
                    } else if (repo.name.startsWith("MavenLocal") && repo.url.toString().startsWith("file:")){
                        // Duplicate local maven - remove it!
                        project.logger.warn("Duplicate mavenLocal() repo detected in project ${project.name} - the corporate gradle distribution has already configured it, so you should remove this!")
                        remove repo
                    } else {
                        project.logger.warn "External repository ${repo.url} detected in project ${project.name}. You should only be using Nexus!"
                    }
                }

                mavenLocal()

                // define Nexus repo for downloads
                maven {
                    name "CorporateNexus"
                    url CorporatePlugins.NEXUS_URL
                }
            }
        }

    }

}

Then I configure each new project by adding the following to the root build.gradle file:

buildscript {
    // makes our plugins (and any others in Nexus) available to all build scripts in the project
    allprojects {
        corporatePlugins.version "1.2.3"
    }
}

allprojects  {
    // apply plugins relevant to all projects (other plugins are applied where required)
    apply plugin: 'corporate.project'

    group = 'com.example'

    // allows quickly updating the wrapper for our custom distribution
    task wrapper(type: Wrapper) {
        distributionUrl = 'https://com.example/repository/maven-public/com/example/corporate-gradle/3.5/corporate-gradle-3.5.zip'
    }
}

While this approach works, allows reproducible builds (unlike our previous setup which applied a build script from a URL - which at the time wasn't cacheable), and allows working offline, it does make it a little magical and I was wondering if I could do things better.

This was all triggered by reading a comment on Github by Gradle dev Stefan Oehme stating that a build should work without relying on an init script, i.e. init scripts should just be decorative and do things like the documented example - preventing unauthorised repos, etc.

My idea was to write some extension functions that would allow me to add our Nexus repo and plugins to a build in a way that looked like they were built into gradle (similar to the extension functions gradleScriptKotlin() and kotlin-dsl() provided by the Gradle Kotlin DSL.

So I created my extension functions in a kotlin gradle project:

package com.example

import org.gradle.api.artifacts.dsl.DependencyHandler
import org.gradle.api.artifacts.dsl.RepositoryHandler
import org.gradle.api.artifacts.repositories.MavenArtifactRepository

fun RepositoryHandler.corporateNexus(): MavenArtifactRepository {
    return maven {
        with(it) {
            name = "Nexus"
            setUrl("https://example.com/repository/maven-public")
        }
    }
}

fun DependencyHandler.corporatePlugins(version: String) : Any {
    return "com.example:corporate-gradle-plugins:$version"
}

With the plan to use them in my project's build.gradle.kts as follows:

import com.example.corporateNexus
import com.example.corporatePlugins

buildscript {

    repositories {
        corporateNexus()
    }

    dependencies {
        classpath(corporatePlugins(version = "1.2.3"))
    }
}

However, Gradle was unable to see my functions when used in the buildscript block (unable to compile script). Using them in the normal project repos/dependencies worked fine though (they are visible and work as expected).

If this worked, I was hoping to bundle the jar into my custom distribution , meaning my init script could just do simple validation instead of hiding away the magical plugin and repo configuration. The extension functions wouldn't need to change, so it wouldn't require releasing a new Gradle distribution when plugins change.

What I tried:

  • adding my jar to the test project's buildscript classpath (i.e. buildscript.dependencies) - doesn't work (maybe this doesn't work by design as it doesn't seem right to be adding a dependency to buildscript that's referred to in the same block)
  • putting the functions in buildSrc (which works for normal project deps/repos but not buildscript, but is not a real solution as it just moves the boilerplate)
  • dropping the jar in the lib folder of the distribution

So my question really boils down to:

  • Is what I'm trying to achieve possible (is it possible to make custom classes/functions visible to the buildScript block)?
  • Is there a better approach to configuring a corporate Nexus repo and making custom plugins (published to Nexus) available across lots of separate projects (i.e. totally different codebases) with minimal boilerplate configuration?
7
  • I think to sum up what you are trying to do, you want to add extensions to the buildscript block? Do you have a lower bound on Gradle version you are using?
    – mkobit
    Sep 15, 2017 at 20:10
  • @mkobit no, i'm in the process of upgrading to 4.1. I guess I'm really trying to improve the way our builds configure nexus, and make our plugins available to the project. The current solution (as documented at the start of this question) works, but the plugin configuration especially feels like a hack! Sep 16, 2017 at 0:29
  • Thanks for clarifying. There may be a few ways that may/may not work/improve upon what you have already done. One would be to write an init script plugin that you can apply in the settings.gradle. In the current 4.2-rc there is also support for Script plugins are cached and only downloaded when necessary instead of on every build. which may improve upon some issues you are having. Another idea may be to provide a custom plugin portal like (github.com/linkedin/custom-gradle-plugin-portal).
    – mkobit
    Sep 17, 2017 at 14:11
  • 1
    I had a chat with Rodrigo (aka Bamboo) at KotlinConf about this. His suggestion was to publish a bootstrap plugin to the gradle plugin portal. We also discussed how remote script plugins might be not so bad any more now they're cached. It would be awesome if someone came up with a really clean and convincing approach - I'm still a bit undecided! Nov 16, 2017 at 2:27
  • 1
    Hi @mkobit I've just added an answer with the solution I ended up going with. I did try applying the plugin management config from a remote script, but even though it's cached, it still tried to do a HEAD request against the script which failed when I didn't have a connection to our Nexus repo (where the script was hosted). So I ended up with a little bit of boilerplate in every settings.gradle.kts file, but it's not too bad! Jun 4, 2018 at 0:21

5 Answers 5

13
+500

If you want to benefit from all the Gradle Kotlin DSL goodness you should strive to apply all plugins using the plugins {} block. See https://github.com/gradle/kotlin-dsl/blob/master/doc/getting-started/Configuring-Plugins.md

You can manage plugin repositories and resolution strategies (e.g. their version) in your settings files. Starting with Gradle 4.4 this file can be written using the Kotlin DSL, aka settings.gradle.kts. See https://docs.gradle.org/4.4-rc-1/release-notes.html.

With this in mind you could then have a centralized Settings script plugin that sets things up and apply it in your builds settings.gradle.kts files:

// corporate-settings.gradle.kts
pluginManagement {
    repositories {
        maven {
            name = "Corporate Nexus"
            url = uri("https://example.com/repository/maven-public")
        }
        gradlePluginPortal()
    }
}

and:

// settings.gradle.kts
apply(from = "https://url.to/corporate-settings.gradle.kts")

Then in your project build scripts you can simply request plugins from your corporate repository:

// build.gradle.kts
plugins {
    id("my-corporate-plugin") version "1.2.3"
}

If you want your project build scripts in a multi-project build to not repeat the plugin version you can do so with Gradle 4.3 by declaring versions in your root project. Note that you also could set the versions in settings.gradle.kts using pluginManagement.resolutionStrategy if having all builds use the same plugins version is what you need.

Also note that for all this to work, your plugins must be published with their plugin marker artifact. This is easily done by using the java-gradle-plugin plugin.

3
  • I haven't had time to try this out yet, but the bounty is up and I feel that this is the answer most in the spirit of my question. Enjoy your 500 points :) Nov 23, 2017 at 2:11
  • :) Please come back with some feedback once you had a chance to implement this
    – eskatos
    Dec 4, 2017 at 13:23
  • 1
    Hi Paul, I've finally had time to come back and post my results - see the answer below. Basically I went with your suggestions, minus the applying from a URL (as it made testing plugin updates more difficult, and introduced a dependency on a connection to Nexus as that's where I hosted the script). Jun 4, 2018 at 0:14
5

I promised @eskatos that I would come back and give feedback on his answer - so here it is!

My final solution consists of:

  • Gradle 4.7 wrapper per project (pointed at a mirror of http://services.gradle.org/distributions setup in Nexus as a raw proxy repository, i.e. it's vanilla Gradle but downloaded via Nexus)
  • Custom Gradle plugins published to our Nexus repo along with plugin markers (generated by the Java Gradle Plugin Development Plugin)
  • Mirroring the Gradle Plugin Portal in our Nexus repo (i.e. a proxy repo pointing at https://plugins.gradle.org/m2)
  • A settings.gradle.kts file per project that configures our maven repo and gradle plugin portal mirror (both in Nexus) as plugin management repositories.

The settings.gradle.kts file contains the following:

pluginManagement {
    repositories {
        // local maven to facilitate easy testing of our plugins
        mavenLocal()

        // our plugins and their markers are now available via Nexus
        maven {
            name = "CorporateNexus"
            url = uri("https://nexus.example.com/repository/maven-public")
        }

        // all external gradle plugins are now mirrored via Nexus
        maven {
            name = "Gradle Plugin Portal"
            url = uri("https://nexus.example.com/repository/gradle-plugin-portal")
        }
    }
}

This means that all plugins and their dependencies are now proxied via Nexus, and Gradle will find our plugins by id as the plugin markers are published to Nexus as well. Having mavenLocal in there as well facilitates easy testing of our plugin changes locally.

Each project's root build.gradle.kts file then applies the plugins as follows:

plugins {
    // plugin markers for our custom plugins allow us to apply our
    // plugins by id as if they were hosted in gradle plugin portal
    val corporatePluginsVersion = "1.2.3"
    id("corporate-project") version corporatePluginsVersion
    // 'apply false` means this plugin can be applied in a subproject
    // without having to specify the version again
    id("corporate-publishing") version corporatePluginsVersion apply false
    // and so on...
}

And configures the gradle wrapper to use our mirrored distribution, which when combined with the above means that everything (gradle, plugins, dependencies) all come via Nexus):

tasks {
    "wrapper"(Wrapper::class) {
        distributionUrl = "https://nexus.example.com/repository/gradle-distributions/gradle-4.7-bin.zip"
    }
}

I was hoping to avoid the boilerplate in the settings files using @eskatos's suggestion of applying a script from a remote URL in settings.gradle.kts. i.e.

apply { from("https://nexus.example.com/repository/maven-public/com/example/gradle/corporate-settings/1.2.3/corporate-settings-1.2.3.kts" }

I even managed to generate a templated script (published alongside our plugins) that:

  • configured the plugin repos (as in the above settings script)
  • used a resolution strategy to apply the version of the plugins associated with the script if the requested plugin id was one of our plugins and the version wasn't supplied (so you can just apply them by id)

However, even though it removed the boilerplate, it meant our builds were reliant on having a connection to our Nexus repo, as it seems that even though scripts applied from a URL are cached, Gradle does a HEAD request anyway to check for changes. It also made it annoying to test plugin changes locally, as I had to point it manually at the script in my local maven directory. With my current config, I can simply publish the plugins to maven local and update the version in my project.

I'm quite happy with the current setup - I think it's far more obvious to developers now how the plugins are applied. And it's made it far easier to upgrade Gradle and our plugins independently now that there's no dependency between the two (and no custom gradle distribution required).

2

I've been doing something like this in my build

buildscript {
    project.apply {
        from("${rootProject.projectDir}/sharedValues.gradle.kts")
    }
    val configureRepository: (Any) -> Unit by extra
    configureRepository.invoke(repositories)
}

In my sharedValues.gradle.kts file I have code like this:

/**
 * This method configures the repository handler to add all of the maven repos that your company relies upon.
 * When trying to pull this method out of the [ExtraPropertiesExtension] use the following code:
 *
 * For Kotlin:
 * ```kotlin
 * val configureRepository : (Any) -> Unit by extra
 * configureRepository.invoke(repositories)
 * ```
 * Any other casting will cause a compiler error.
 *
 * For Groovy:
 * ```groovy
 * def configureRepository = project.configureRepository
 * configureRepository.invoke(repositories)
 * ```
 *
 * @param repoHandler The RepositoryHandler to be configured with the company repositories.
 */
fun repositoryConfigurer(repoHandler : RepositoryHandler) {
    repoHandler.apply {
        // Do stuff here
    }
}

var configureRepository : (RepositoryHandler) -> Unit by extra
configureRepository = this::repositoryConfigurer

I follow a similar patter for configuring the resolution strategy for plugins.

The nice thing about this pattern is that anything you configure in sharedValues.gradle.kts can also be used from your buildSrc project meaning that you can reuse repository declarations.


Updated:

You can apply another script from a URL, for example doing this:

apply {
    // This was actually a plugin that I used at one point.
    from("http://dl.bintray.com/shemnon/javafx-gradle/8.1.1/javafx.plugin")
}

Simply host your script that you want all your builds to share on some http server (would highly recommend using HTTPS so your build can't be targeted by a man in the middle attack).

The downside of this is that I don't think that scripts applied from urls aren't cached so they will be re-downloaded every time you run your build. This may have been fixed by now, I'm not certain.

2
  • Hmm that's a similar approach to the workaround I'm currently using - except my boilerplate is defined once in the initscript (inside my custom distribution) instead of in the buildSrc of every codebase. May 10, 2017 at 23:47
  • Hi Jonathon, I've updated my question. Hopefully it makes it more obvious that we both have a very similar approach - except you configure things from your sharedValues script via extra (which could be hosted remotely and cached in new versions of Gradle), and I configure things from an init script plugin via an extension. I'm hoping to find a better solution - I'm not happy with either of our solutions (sorry!). Nov 18, 2017 at 11:01
1

A solution offered to me by Stefan Oehme when I was having a similar problem was to vendor my own custom distribution of Gradle. According to him this is a common thing to do at large companies.

Simply create a custom fork of the gradle repo, add your companies special sauce to every project using this custom version of gradle.

1
  • 1
    To me, this is a last resort. It will certainly work, and as we've discussed on Slack, is probably how big companies like Netflix probably solve this problem, but the maintenance overhead is a massive point against this approach to me (having to constantly maintain a fork of such an active repo). With my current approach I simply have to bump the version every time Gradle updates and my new custom dist gets published to Nexus - I don't have to merge and I don't have to build from source. Nov 21, 2017 at 23:23
0

I encountered a similar problem when common config is replicated in each and every project. Solved it by a custom gradle distribution with the common settings defined in init script.

Created a gradle plugin for preparing such custom distributions - custom-gradle-dist. It works perfectly for my projects, e.g. a build.gradle for a library project looks like this (this is a complete file):

dependencies {
    compile 'org.springframework.kafka:spring-kafka'
}

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