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I am having a problem where the OOM killer is being triggered some times. I have researched in the internet and have found many related threads. But a few things still puzzle me. I hope some one could help me.

Environment: iMX6 (32bit). User/Kernelspace split: 2G-2G
TotalRAm - 4GB

Some important logs:

top invoked oom-killer: gfp_mask=0x201da, order=0, oom_score_adj=0
I see that it is trying to allocate 1 page of (contagious) memory (order=0) in the HIGHMEM zone (from gfp_mask). Please correct me if i am wrong.

DMA free:1322780kB min:4492kB low:5612kB high:6736kB active_anon:0kB inactive_anon:0kB active_file:84kB
DMA: 941*4kB (UEMC) 1211*8kB (UEMC) 1185*16kB (UEMC) 836*32kB (UEMC) 554*64kB
(UEMC) 295*128kB (UEMC) 106*256kB
HighMem free:480kB min:512kB low:2384kB high:4256kB active_anon:2021148kB inactive_anon:70364kB active_file:0kB
HighMem: 0*4kB 1*8kB (R) 0*16kB 7*32kB (R) 0*64kB 0*128kB 0*256kB 0*512kB 0*1024kB 0*2048kB 0*4096kB 0*8192kB

I believe the OOM-killer is triggered as the free Highmem (480KB) is below the min (512KB). Again please correct me if i am wrong.

My questions:
1. I thought the DMA_ZONE is only about 16MB, NORMAL_ZONE is upwards from 16MB to about 896MB and the rest is HIGHMEM_ZONE. But the log shows more than 1GB free pages (1322780kB) exist in the DMA_ZONE.
2. Why does not the kernel utilize this Zone for further allocation?

Morelogs: (taken out from the complete log):
DMA per-cpu:
CPU 0: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 0
CPU 1: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 0
CPU 2: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 0
CPU 3: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 0
HighMem per-cpu:
CPU 0: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 51
CPU 1: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 20
CPU 2: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 4
CPU 3: hi: 186, btch: 31 usd: 14
active_anon:505287 inactive_anon:17591 isolated_anon:0
active_file:21 inactive_file:0 isolated_file:0
unevictable:0 dirty:0 writeback:0 unstable:0
free:330815 slab_reclaimable:1134 slab_unreclaimable:3487
mapped:15956 shmem:25014 pagetables:1982 bounce:0
25046 total pagecache pages
983039 pages of RAM
331349 free pages
9947 reserved pages
2772 slab pages
543663 pages shared
0 pages swap cached

cat /proc/pagetypeinfo
Page block order: 13
Pages per block: 8192

Free pages count per migrate type at order 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
Node 0, zone DMA, type Unmovable 1 0 9 8 3 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 Node 0, zone DMA, type Reclaimable 4 5 5 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 Node 0, zone DMA, type Movable 1 6 4 0 0 0 1 1 2 4 3 3 4 28
Node 0, zone DMA, type Reserve 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Node 0, zone DMA, type CMA 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 3
Node 0, zone DMA, type Isolate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Node 0, zone HighMem, type Unmovable 11 7 2 2 9 6 5 3 3 1 0 1 1 0
Node 0, zone HighMem, type Reclaimable 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Node 0, zone HighMem, type Movable 23 201 4771 4084 1803 403 105 69 57 38 23 21 8 23
Node 0, zone HighMem, type Reserve 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Node 0, zone HighMem, type CMA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Node 0, zone HighMem, type Isolate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Number of blocks type Unmovable Reclaimable Movable Reserve CMA Isolate
Node 0, zone DMA 5 1 33 1 16 0
Node 0, zone HighMem 2 0 62 1 0 0

I would be glad to post further logs if necessary.

Thankyou,
Srik

  • had some code put in comment by mistake not sure if a good answer but put it in answer below – brad Apr 27 '17 at 15:52
  • any other suggstions? – srik Apr 28 '17 at 21:01
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probably long shot but have you tried adding

vm.overcommit_memory = 2
vm.overcommit_ratio = 80

to

/etc/sysctl.conf

  • that should stop applications from being able to request more memory than available but I could be WAY off base dont usually have to much in kernel for years.... – brad Apr 27 '17 at 15:54
  • thanks for your response. The current overcommit_memory is the default 0. I am not sure it this would help. Even if it helps, the application would not get the memory it desires. My question is the DMA_ZONE seems to be having about 1.3GB of memory free, why does not kernel use this memory for the allocation to a user space? – srik Apr 27 '17 at 20:52
  • Not a Linux kernel expert... but it might not allow applications to access larger amounts of memory if even only some of the memory is protected. It could be possible that a high priority kernel level call needs the same memory that a user level application is trying to use and the user level would get denied the memory. Have you seen any logs where any smaller user level applications used the DMA_ZONE? – brad Apr 29 '17 at 0:39

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