5

I've been tasked with rewriting this terrible piece of code which is meant to sequentially fade in layers on a map (they are all transparent pngs) on a web page. It needs to operate in a sequence, then loop back to the start where no layers are visible, and fade back in one at a time. This sequence should repeat itself forever.

I'm not really sure what the most recommended way of doing this is in javascript and interested what stack overflow has to say.

There has to be a better way than this! Am interested in pros/cons of any methods.

setInterval(function(){
    $("#layer-1").fadeIn(1000, function() {
      $("#layer-2").fadeIn(1000, function() {
        $("#layer-3").fadeIn(1000, function() {
          $("#layer-4").fadeIn(1000, function() {
            $("#layer-5").fadeIn(1000, function() {
              $("#layer-6").fadeIn(1000, function() {
                $("#layer-7").fadeIn(1000, function() {
                  $("#layer-8").fadeIn(1000, function() {
                    // pause for 2 seconds, then reset and hide all layers:
                    $("#home-map .layer").delay(2000).fadeOut();
                  });
                });
              });
            });
          });
        });
      });
    });
  }, 10000)

Edit: The reason I think this is different to other answers is because I was trying to set things up in an infinite loop, as well as chaining the animations. There are lots of approaches to solving callback hell in javascript and its a very common sticking point, so no doubt there will be similar questions.

  • 4
    Using promises :) developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – xale94 Apr 27 '17 at 17:24
  • Yep, promises would be a great approach to help mitigate some of this. You could also probably handle a lot of this as a loop as the order of layers seems pretty regular. – Alexander Nied Apr 27 '17 at 17:27
  • I tried writing a recursive function but got stuck... had it figured out logically in my head but ran into weirdness... when you do .fadeOut("slow", callback) on multiple items, and use the callback, it starts e.g. 8 new calls to the recursive function... I think. Javascript hurts my head! – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 17:29
  • Promises are the wrong approach here – zzzzBov Apr 27 '17 at 17:29
5

Challenge accepted... using an recursive approach.

(function main(index){
   if(index >= 9){
     return $.when($("#home-map .layer").delay(2000).fadeOut()).then(function(){
         main(1); //restart
     });
   }
  $("#layer-"+index).fadeIn(1000, function(){
         main(index+1);
  });
 })(1);

http://jsbin.com/rurokipipi/1/edit?output

|improve this answer|||||
  • this is very similar to what I had (deleted my code or I'd have posted it), in practice the callback of fadeOut() seemed to be firing once per layer (each element matched by the selector)... I may be wrong but that's what it seemed like was happening +1 for pure recursive approach though – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 18:34
  • @mike-source stackoverflow.com/questions/7378349/… – Jonas Wilms Apr 27 '17 at 18:36
  • rewarding this top answer as it is in my opinion the best, @yivo's answer is essentially similar but probably a bit easier to follow and doesn't rely on when/then (something I wasn't aware existed) – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 18:45
  • @mike-source thanks ;) ( didnt know either, just quickly looked it up...) – Jonas Wilms Apr 27 '17 at 19:27
6

use a class instead of ids, then loop through them and add delay based on their index

var layers = $(".layer").length;

function foreverLoop() {

  $(".masterLayer").show();
  $(".layer").hide();

  $(".layer").each(function(index) {
    $(this).delay(1000*index).fadeIn(1000);
  });
  
  $(".masterLayer").delay(1000*layers + 2000).fadeOut(1000);
  
  setTimeout("foreverLoop()", 1000*layers + 3000 + 500);
}

foreverLoop();
.layer {
  display: none;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="masterLayer">
  <div class="layer">layer 1</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 2</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 3</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 4</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 5</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 6</div>
</div>

|improve this answer|||||
  • There is no fadeOut for all layers as author requested. – yivo Apr 27 '17 at 17:43
  • @yivo added in the fadeOut of all of them – indubitablee Apr 27 '17 at 17:51
  • it doesn't loop – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 18:20
  • @mike-source with looping. i thought you wanted a proof of concept alternative to callback hell, not to create the whole solution – indubitablee Apr 27 '17 at 18:45
  • ok, not a bad solution either now sorry for not making that clear! I was most interested in how to restart the sequence. was trying to understand if the fact it needed looping would mean one solution to callback hell was better in this situation than another, i dont think it matters too much. this is a suitable answer too. – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 18:50
5

By using async await + promises

if you call .promise() after a animation you will get a promise back. thanks to it you can be able to wait for it to finish

async function animate() {
    await $("#layer-1").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    await $("#layer-2").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    await $("#layer-3").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    await $("#layer-4").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    await $("#layer-5").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    await $("#layer-6").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    await $("#layer-7").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    await $("#layer-8").fadeIn(1000).promise()
    // pause for 2 seconds, then reset and hide all layers:
    await $("#home-map .layer").delay(2000).fadeOut().promise();
}

const loop = () => animate().then(loop)
loop()

Looking at this makes a for loop fit in very well.

async function animate() {
    for (let i = 1; i < 9; i++)
        await $(`#layer-${i}`).fadeIn(1000).promise()

    // pause for 2 seconds, then reset and hide all layers:
    await $("#home-map .layer").delay(2000).fadeOut();
}

This is only possible in most recent browser


Guessing it can be made more dynamic if you did

for (let layer of $("#home-map .layer"))
    await $(layer).fadeIn(1000).promise()

Here is a es5 alternativ to same problem but using reduce to chain promises

function animate() {
  $(".layer").toArray().reduce(function(prev, elm){
    return prev.then(function(){
      return $(elm).fadeIn(1000).promise();
    })
  }, Promise.resolve()).then(function(){
    // do the master
    $(".masterLayer").delay(2000).fadeOut();
  })
}

animate()
.layer {
  display: none;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div class="masterLayer">
  <div class="layer">layer 1</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 2</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 3</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 4</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 5</div>
  <div class="layer">layer 6</div>
</div>

|improve this answer|||||
  • This is an excellent answer for those who can use async/await. For those who can't, I recommend queue, which is certainly more verbose but results in essentially the same calling order – zzzzBov Apr 27 '17 at 17:50
3

var MAX_LAYER_NUMBER        = 8;
var LAYER_FADE_IN_DURATION  = 1000;
var LAYER_FADE_OUT_DURATION = 1000;
var LAYER_FADE_IN_OUT_DELAY = 2000;

function fadeInLayer(layerNumber, done) {
  if (layerNumber <= MAX_LAYER_NUMBER) {
    $('#layer-' + layerNumber).stop(true, true).fadeIn(LAYER_FADE_IN_DURATION, function() {
      done(layerNumber);
      fadeInLayer(layerNumber + 1, done);
    });
  }
}

function fadeInOutLayers() {
  fadeInLayer(1, function(layerNumber) {
    if (layerNumber === MAX_LAYER_NUMBER) {
      $(".layer").delay(LAYER_FADE_IN_OUT_DELAY).fadeOut(LAYER_FADE_OUT_DURATION);
    }
  });
}


$(function() {
  fadeInOutLayers();
  setInterval(fadeInOutLayers, LAYER_FADE_IN_DURATION * MAX_LAYER_NUMBER + LAYER_FADE_IN_OUT_DELAY + LAYER_FADE_OUT_DURATION)
});
.layer {
  display: none;
}
<script type="text/javascript" src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="layer-1" class="layer">layer-1</div>
<div id="layer-2" class="layer">layer-2</div>
<div id="layer-3" class="layer">layer-3</div>
<div id="layer-4" class="layer">layer-4</div>
<div id="layer-5" class="layer">layer-5</div>
<div id="layer-6" class="layer">layer-6</div>
<div id="layer-7" class="layer">layer-7</div>
<div id="layer-8" class="layer">layer-8</div>

|improve this answer|||||
  • I got about this far... is the only way to make this loop to call setInterval() on fadeInOutLayers()? – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 17:47
  • @mike-source Hi. I have updated answer: added code snippets and setInterval. – yivo Apr 27 '17 at 17:51
  • probably what I'm going to go with as this is close to my first attempt and feels the most intuitive to me... i'm just struggling to explain it to my students! need to sit down with a coffee and pick it apart for bit, thanks though! – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 17:54
  • @mike-source Please ask. I will help you :) – yivo Apr 27 '17 at 17:56
  • where you've used done(layerNumber); is this a way to access the callback function passed to fadeInLayer in the fadeInOutLayers function? i think that's what i was missing or getting confused with – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 18:09
1

What you have is a recurring series of asynchronous function calls. You could use promises to flatten your arrow code, but we're not talking about code that we expect to throw errors, so there's no need of asynchronous try..catch, which is what promises are.

Asynchronous functions that happen in sequence are queues. jQuery has a nice queue method, which is what I recommend here.

Now, because you're executing this queue on a variety of different elements, you'll need to pick a common element to store the core queue on. In this case, I'll use body but you could use pretty much any element (I recommend the closest common parent to all of the elements that you're animating because it will allow you to use the structure on the page in multiple places without the queues interfering with one-another, but that's more of an advanced step).

The fx queue is the default queue, which is where animations actually occur. We're going to want to manage this queue separately from the fx queue so that other animations can happen alongside this queue.

function myAnimation() {
  $('body')
    // queue up the next step of the animation
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      // `next` is a function that tells the queue to continue
      // on to the next step. We pass next to the complete
      // callback of the animation so that they can continue
      // fluidly.
      $('#player-1').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-2').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-3').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-3').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-4').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-5').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-6').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-7').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#player-8').fadeIn(1000, next);
    })
    // here we want to wait for a bit before continuing with
    // the rest of the queue
    .delay(2000, 'my-animation')
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      $('#home-map .layer').fadeOut(next);
    })
    // here we repeat the animation so that a `setInterval` call
    // is unnecessary, and so that we don't have to care how long
    // the animation takes in total
    .queue('my-animation', (next) => {
      // queue up the next iteration of the animation
      myAnimation();
      // continue with the queued animation
      next();
    });
}

myAnimation(); // queue up the animation
$('body').dequeue('my-animation'); // start the animation

Now, this code is awfully repetitive. I'll leave it as an exercise to the reader to change it to a simple for loop or whatever you'd like it to be. It's just an example of the overall simplification.

The code in this example is longer than the original, but don't let that fool you. Because it's a queue, it's easier to reason about and edit later. Steps can be inserted and removed without needing to change wait times or attempt to rebalance nested parenthesis/curly braces.

|improve this answer|||||
  • thanks for this answer, probably not the way I would approach it but this is why i love stack overflow! I'm sure knowing this will come in handy sooner or later. – mike-source Apr 27 '17 at 18:11
  • Instead of queue you could do $('#player-2').fadeIn.promise().then(() => $('#player-3').fadeIn.promise()).then(...) – Endless Apr 27 '17 at 18:12
  • you could. promise will wait for the entire fx queue on the node to complete before firing. There are some implications there that could cause issues if you want multiple animations on the same node simultaneously. With that said, if you need that much control, you probably shouldn't use jQuery, and instead would want to try something like GSAP. – zzzzBov Apr 27 '17 at 18:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for?Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.