10
var cheapest = leaves.sort((a,b) => <boolean>(<number>a.cost < <number>b.cost));
//also tried without casting

Gives me the following error:

'Error'
message: 'Argument of type '(a: any, b: any) => boolean' is not assignable to parameter of type '(a: any, b: any) => number'.
Type 'boolean' is not assignable to type 'number'.'

How should i fix this?

Edit: The js code ( original) is taken from : https://github.com/atomicptr/goap/blob/gh-pages/gameplay/ai/planner.js , which indeed seems to sort by bool instead of number.

1
  • 1
    You should send them a PR to fix the bug ;) Commented Apr 27, 2017 at 22:48

3 Answers 3

22

This is not how Array.sort works. You need to return a number, but the predicate you've given returns a boolean (The less than (<) operator results in true or false). The sort order is determined by whether the number your function returns is negative, positive, or zero. The MDN example illustrates this well with an example compare function.

function compare(a, b) {
  if (a is less than b by some ordering criterion) {
    return -1;
  }
  if (a is greater than b by the ordering criterion) {
    return 1;
  }
  // a must be equal to b
  return 0;
}

If you want to sort ascending you can do this with

var cheapest = leaves.sort((a,b) => a.cost - b.cost);

assuming that leaves is typed correctly so a and b have their types correctly inferred.

3

The comparator function of a sort should return -1, 0, or 1. Returning a boolean instead (effectively 1 or 0) will fail to sort the list correctly!

For example, in Chrome (sort implementations are host-dependent), this line:

[1, 2, 5, 6, 5, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 4, 2, 4, 6, 3].sort(function(a, b) { return a < b; })

Produces:

[3, 3, 5, 6, 5, 5, 4, 6, 4, 4, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1]

Which is not sorted!

You should write something like a > b ? 1 : a === b ? 0 : -1 instead

1
  • 2
    Both MDN and MSDN say that only the sign of returned value matters, so the example could be written simply as [1, 2, 5, 6, 5, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 4, 2, 4, 6, 3].sort((a, b) => a - b)
    – artem
    Commented Apr 28, 2017 at 1:00
3

When using Array.prototype.sort(), a comparator function can be used to properly define sorting behaviour. According to the MDN Javascript documentation:

To compare numbers instead of strings, the compare function can simply subtract b from a.

Thus to sort the array 'leaves' in ascending order:

var cheapest = leaves.sort((a,b) => a.cost- b.cost);

With a Typescript generic:

var cheapest = leaves.sort((a,b) => <number>(a.cost- b.cost));
1
  • Correct, do not type the 'a' and 'b' arguments, since the function signature expected by 'sort()' is '(a: unknown, b: unknown) => number' Commented Aug 30, 2022 at 17:31

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