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Given a tree, I'm supposed to check if it's symmetrical, or a mirror of itself down the center. I'm missing one edge case and cannot for the life of me figure out what it is. The only error I get on CodeFights is "Output limit exceeded"

Here's what the example tree looks like

This is the main function isTreeSymmetric assigns its left branch to a variable that invokes the leftBranch function and right branch to the rightBranch function which recursively return an array.

The reason I used two different functions was because it helped me compartmentalize my thinking given that on the left half of the tree I had to go right to left and vice versa for the right half so I didn't get lost in a tree hole.

The last return statement in isTreeSymmetrical then checks if the returned type values are Arrays followed by a ternary that either checks the left and right arrays or checks the equality of variables lb and rb in the case the values were not arrays.

I've been working on this for what feels like eternity! Help please.

function isTreeSymmetric(t) {
  "use strict";
  if(!t || ( (!t.left && !t.right) && t.value)) return true
  if(!t.left || !t.right) return false

  let left = t.left, right = t.right
  let rb = rightBranch(right), lb = leftBranch(left)
    console.log(`right branch values are ${rb} | left branch values are ${lb}`)
    return Array.isArray( rb || lb ) ?
              rb.every( (e, i) => e === lb[i]) :
                lb === rb

}


//ON RIGHT BRANCH RETURN CHILDREN LEFT TO RIGHT
function rightBranch(n){
  "use strict";
  if(!n) return null

  let value = n.value
  if(!n.left && !n.right) return value

  let left = n.left || null, right = n.right || null;

  return [value].concat(
    rightBranch(left),
    rightBranch(right)
  )

}

// ON LEFT BRANCH RETURN CHILDREN RIGHT TO LEFT
function leftBranch(n) {
  "use strict";
  if(!n) return null
  
  let value = n.value
  if(!n.left && !n.right) return value

  let left = n.left || null, right = n.right || null;
  
  return [value].concat(
    leftBranch(right),
    leftBranch(left))

}

let t = {
    "value": 1,
    "left": {
        "value": 2,
        "left": {
            "value": 3,
            "left": null,
            "right": null
        },
        "right": {
            "value": 4,
            "left": null,
            "right": null
        }
    },
    "right": {
        "value": 2,
        "left": {
            "value": 4,
            "left": null,
            "right": null
        },
        "right": {
            "value": 3,
            "left": null,
            "right": null
        }
    }
}
console.log(isTreeSymmetric(t)) //true

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  • 1
    Welcome to StackOverflow. Please read and follow the posting guidelines in the help documentation. Minimal, complete, verifiable example applies here. We cannot effectively help you until you post your MCVE code and accurately describe the problem. We should be able to paste your posted code into a text file and reproduce the problem. Among other things, this has no driver program, you haven't told us what output you do get, and there's no apparent attempt to trace the code with either basic print statements or a debugger. – Prune Apr 28 '17 at 1:41
  • At the very least you should provide sample input, expected output and actual output (kept to a minimum of course). – RobG Apr 28 '17 at 2:06
  • You collect all node values of the left and right subtree of the root and compare them, so far so good, but you have to collect them in the same order. So if all nodes have unique values then an easy way to ensure that is to first explore the branch with the lower node value when collecting values (currently you always explore left first). – maraca Apr 28 '17 at 2:11
  • Hey guys, sorry it outputs a boolean but there's a hidden test that I can't see the inputs for! The only thing it's giving me is 'Output limit exceeded on test 12. (which is hidden)' I'll add the test cases I do have although my code is passing those so I'm not sure if that'll be much help. – nzoLogic Apr 28 '17 at 2:14
  • But collecting the values is actually not good enough, you also have to check if both subtrees have the same structure, which you could do by traversing them simultaneously. – maraca Apr 28 '17 at 2:15
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The reason I used two different functions was because it helped me compartmentalize my thinking given that on the left half of the tree I had to go right to left and vice versa for the right half so I didn't get lost in a tree hole.

But there's fundamentally nothing different about handling the left or right sides of your tree. Each L and R is another tree – so all you have to do is compare (l.left, r.left) and (l.right, r.right)

Below we have a recursive function that creates a tree-like recursive process. It will short-circuit and return false as soon as any compared values are not equal.

Instead of using the tree literal you made, I made a simple Node constructor to build the tree nodes more easily. This allows me to create a test case for both symmetric and asymmetric trees to verify our function is working correctly

const isTreeSymmetric = tree => {
  const aux = (l, r) => {
    if (l === undefined && r === undefined)
      return true
    else if (l === undefined || r === undefined)
      return false
    else if (l.value === r.value)
      return aux(l.left, r.left) && aux(l.right, r.right)
    else
      return false
  }
  return aux(tree.left, tree.right)
}

const Node = (value, left, right) => ({value, left, right})

const tree1 =
  Node(1,
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5))),
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5))))
      
const tree2 =
  Node(1,
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5))),
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(6000))))

console.log(isTreeSymmetric(tree1)) // true
console.log(isTreeSymmetric(tree2)) // false


Code re-use

The astute observer will notice that the aux function above is check for tree equality – this is a useful function on it's own so it makes sense to define it outside of isTreeSymmetric.

This is probably a better way to write our isTreeSymmetric function because it's clearer what's happening and promotes function reuse

const isTreeEqual = (x, y) => {
  if (x === undefined && y === undefined)
    return true
  else if (x === undefined || y === undefined)
    return false
  else if (x.value === y.value)
    return isTreeEqual(x.left, y.left) && isTreeEqual(x.right, y.right)
  else
    return false
}

const isTreeSymmetric = tree =>
  isTreeEqual(tree.left, tree.right)

const Node = (value, left, right) => ({value, left, right})

const tree1 =
  Node(1,
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5))),
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5))))
      
const tree2 =
  Node(1,
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5))),
    Node(2,
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(5)),
      Node(3, Node(4), Node(6000))))

console.log(isTreeSymmetric(tree1)) // true
console.log(isTreeSymmetric(tree2)) // false

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  • Ahh I see now. Thank you so much! All I had to do was check the case where a null value node was passed and changed 'undefined' to null. This really helped me gain a deeper understanding of es6 recursion and tree traversal. – nzoLogic Apr 28 '17 at 19:44
  • 1
    Happy to help. You might want to use == null which would cover both null and undefined cases – Thank you Apr 28 '17 at 20:03
1

You don't actually need to check the nodes or group it in an array. Just do as you and @naomik have done but return isTreeEqual(x.left, y.right) && isTreeEqual(x.right, y.left). This checks value and symmetry (since a right branch to the right needs to be symmetric with a left branch to the left and a left banch going right needs to be symmetric with a right branch going left).

Code:

function isTreeSymmetric(t) {
    if (!t){
        return true
    }
    return isTreeEqual(t.left, t.right)
}

isTreeEqual = function(x, y) {
    if (!x && !y){
        return true
    }
    if (!x || !y){
        return false
    }
    if (x.value === y.value){
        return isTreeEqual(x.left, y.right) && isTreeEqual(x.right, y.left)
    } else {
        return false
    }
} 
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I better use single function to traverse the children for the given tree. In the code above the sequence of traversing is swaping the values, so it fails to check the symmetric tree condition. Check the following code and let me know if it works for you.

function isTreeSymmetric(t) {
  "use strict";

  if(!t || ( (!t.left && !t.right) && t.value)) return true
  if(!t.left || !t.right) return false

  let left = t.left, right = t.right
  let rb = traverseTree(right), lb = traverseTree(left)

    return Array.isArray( rb || lb ) ?
              rb.every( (e, i) => e === lb[i]) :
                lb === rb

}



// ON traverseTree
function traverseTree(n) {
  "use strict";
  if(!n) return null

  let value = n.value
  if(!n.left && !n.right) return value

  let left = n.left || null, right = n.right || null;

  return [value].concat(
    traverseTree(left),
    traverseTree(right))

}

  var tree;

  tree = {
    value: 1,
    left: {
      value: 2,
      left: {
        value: 3
      },
      right: {
        value: 4
      }
    },
    right: {
      value: 2,
      left: {
        value: 3
      },
      right: {
        value: 4
      }
    }
  };

console.log(isTreeSymmetric(tree));

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  • This doesn't return the nodes in the correct order. Checking for symmetry, we have to compare the left branches inner nodes to the right branches inner nodes and same with outer. Reason I used separate leftBranch and rightBranch functions was because the leftBranch (which is the left half of the tree) will always return it's right child first and the rightBranch (which is the right half of the tree) always return its left child first. That way when I traverse the values they are in the correct order. – nzoLogic Apr 28 '17 at 2:37
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here's a little bit of a simpler version that solves this problem in JavaScript by just doing a level order traversal, hope it helps!

var isSymmetric = function(root) {
    var levels = levelOrder(root)
    for (var x = 1; x < levels.length; x++) {
        var level = levels[x]
        for (var i = 0, j = level.length-1; i < level.length; i++,j--) {
            if (level[i] != level[j]) {
                return false
            }
        }
    }
    return true
};

var levelOrder = function(node) {
    if (node == null) { return []}
    var discovered = [];
    discovered.push(node)
    var levels = levelOrderTraverse(discovered,[])
    return levels
}

function levelOrderTraverse(discovered,elms) {
    var level = []
    for (var i = 0; i < discovered.length; i++) {
        if (discovered[i] != null) {
            level.push(discovered[i].val)
        } else {
            level.push("null")
        }

    }
    elms.push(level);
    var newlyDiscovered = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < discovered.length; i++) {
        if (discovered[i] != null) {
            if (discovered[i].left != null) {
                newlyDiscovered.push(discovered[i].left)
            } else {
                newlyDiscovered.push(null)
            }
            if (discovered[i].right != null) {
                newlyDiscovered.push(discovered[i].right)
            } else {
                newlyDiscovered.push(null)
            }
        }
    }
    if (newlyDiscovered.length > 0) {
        levelOrderTraverse(newlyDiscovered,elms)
    }
    return elms
}

also can be found on my github

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