21

I want to prevent people from calling the lambda without handling the return value.

Clang 4.0 refuses everything I've tried, compiling with -std=c++1z:

auto x = [&] [[nodiscard]] () { return 1; };
// error: nodiscard attribute cannot be applied to types
auto x = [[nodiscard]] [&]() { return 1; };
// error: expected variable name or 'this' in lambda capture list
auto x [[nodiscard]] = [&]() { return 1; };
// warning: nodiscard attribute only applies to functions, methods, enums, and classes
[[nodiscard]] auto x = [&]() { return 1; };
// warning: nodiscard attribute only applies to functions, methods, enums, and classes
auto x = [&]() [[nodiscard]] { return 1; };
// error: nodiscard attribute cannot be applied to types

Is this some sort of bug in clang or a hole in the standard?

12
  • 2
    [expr.prim.lambda] would suggest [&]() [[nodiscard]] { return 1; }.
    – Kerrek SB
    Apr 28 '17 at 18:10
  • 8
    ...however, [dcl.attr.nodiscard] does not allow that particular attribute in a lambda. If I had to guess, I'd say it's because there's little use for this: lambdas are usually passed as callbacks to some other part of the code, and so the nodiscardiness cannot be checked anyway.
    – Kerrek SB
    Apr 28 '17 at 18:12
  • 4
    Hm, it looks like your edited question already contains the exact answer you need as part of the diagnostic :-S
    – Kerrek SB
    Apr 28 '17 at 18:17
  • 3
    I use them often as local functions in which case the nodiscardiness would be relevant, unless I misunderstand nodiscardiness completely.
    – Dan Olson
    Apr 28 '17 at 18:17
  • 5
    Sure, but if the use is only local, you can kind of see whether you're calling them. The value of marking API function as nodiscard is that things like vector::empty don't get misunderstood by third parties. If it's your own code, it's much less of an issue.
    – Kerrek SB
    Apr 28 '17 at 18:23
16

You can't apply nodiscard to lambdas, but you can write a wrapper:

template <typename F>
struct NoDiscard {
    F f;
    NoDiscard(F const& f) : f(f) {}
    template <typename... T>
    [[nodiscard]] constexpr auto operator()(T&&... t) const
      noexcept(noexcept(f(std::forward<T>(t)...))) {
        return f(std::forward<T>(t)...);
    }
};

int main() {
    NoDiscard([](int i) {return i;})(0);
}

Demo.

3
  • How about adding const noexcept(noexcept(f(std::forward<T>(t)...))) to the operator() for nitpickers like me out there? :)
    – Rostislav
    Apr 28 '17 at 20:31
  • @Rostislav I'm not sure the const is a strict improvement, as it prevents us from using non-const operator()s in F, although that admittedly matters less for lambdas.
    – Columbo
    Apr 28 '17 at 20:33
  • Yeah, had my brain strictly on lambdas and their operator(...) const. Probably const and non-const overloads in the wrapper would be proper. But all this is definitely use-case dependent.
    – Rostislav
    Apr 28 '17 at 21:09

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