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I'm writing a colour class which stores its colour with a single integer, and has r, g, and b getters and setters which manipulate/retrieve from that single integer.

export default class Colour {
    private col: number;
    public get r () {
        return (this.col >> 16) & 0xFF;
    }
    public get g () {
        return (this.col >> 8) & 0xFF;
    }
    public get b () {
        return (this.col >> 0) & 0xFF;
    }
    // setters here

    constructor(colour: string);
    constructor(redGreenBlue: number);
    constructor(red: number, green: number, blue: number);
    constructor(colourOrRed: string | number, green?: number, blue?: number) {
        if (typeof colourOrRed == "string") {
            if (colourOrRed.startsWith("#")) colourOrRed = colourOrRed.slice(1);
            this.col = parseInt(colourOrRed, 16);
        } else {
            colourOrRed = Maths.clamp(colourOrRed, 0, 255);
            green = typeof green == "number" ? Maths.clamp(green, 0, 255) : colourOrRed;
            blue = typeof blue == "number" ? Maths.clamp(blue, 0, 255) : colourOrRed;
            this.col = (1 << 24) + (colourOrRed << 16) + (green << 8) + blue;
        }
    }
}

The only way to do this that I've been able to come up with is to get the other channels out of the colour, and then set the colour integer the same way as I do in the constructor.

public set r (red: number) {
    red = Maths.clamp(red, 0, 255);
    this.col = (1 << 24) + (red << 16) + (this.g << 8) + this.b;
}

How would I go about setting the red, green, and blue channels individually, without having to retrieve the past values? Is there a way to do this? I'm assuming there's fancy bitwise operations that I can use, but I don't know how (the bitwise operators in this code I copied from other answers).

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    this.col = (this.col & 0x00FFFF) | (Maths.clamp(red, 0, 255) << 16) or without Maths.clamp() this.col = (this.col & 0x00FFFF) | (red>0? red<255? red << 16: 0xFF0000: 0) – Thomas Apr 29 '17 at 1:37
  • Can you make an answer out of that? It works great! Thank you very much =) – Mackenzie McClane Apr 29 '17 at 1:43
  • what exactly is the (1 << 24) part for? do you have a toString() or some sort of toHex() function in there? – Thomas Apr 29 '17 at 2:00
  • I'm not actually sure what that's for, I copy-pasted that code from another stack overflow question and it worked with it so I left it haha – Mackenzie McClane Apr 29 '17 at 3:01
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    Then do some exercises (pen and paper). Write some random integer (let's start with ~8-16 bit) in binary notation in the first row, write another int in binary notation in the second row (maybe 0x0F to begin with). Now in the third row you write a 1 in every column where both rows contain a 1, and fill all the other columns with zeroes. That's a bitwise &. For a bitwise | you write a 1 into the third row wherever either one of the rows or both rows have a 1. Do a few of these exercises till you stop thinking about numbers but instead just see the two "arrays" to merge. – Thomas Apr 29 '17 at 4:53
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You can use a bitmask to keep the other color channels intact and only add the clamped value for the particular channel; pretty much the same way you extract the color for a channel, only backwards.

Since I don't know how exactly Maths.clamp() is implemented, and how much overhead it adds, I'd prefer the explicit versions here.

export default class Colour {
    private col: number;

    public get r () {
        return (this.col >> 16) & 0xFF;
    }
    public set r (value: number) {
        this.col = (this.col & 0x0100FFFF) | (value>0? value<255? value<<16: 0xFF0000: 0);
    }

    public get g () {
        return (this.col >> 8) & 0xFF;
    }
    public set g (value: number) {
        this.col = (this.col & 0x01FF00FF) | (value>0? value<255? value<<8: 0x00FF00: 0);
    }

    public get b () {
        return (this.col >> 0) & 0xFF;
    }
    public set b (value: number) {
        this.col = (this.col & 0x01FFFF00) | (value>0? value<255? value: 0x0000FF: 0);
    }
}

Edit: updated the masks to include/keep the 1<<24 bit from the constructor. It's probably a hack to avoid the necessity to add leading zeroes when converting the color to its HEX-representation. something like this.col.toString(16).substr(-6).

  • My Maths.clamp function was this: return Math.min(Math.max(toClamp, min), max);, but I'll use your version. Thanks! – Mackenzie McClane Apr 29 '17 at 3:02
  • Do you think it would be a good idea to take the (1<<24) out of the question in order to make the question more specific for anyone stumbling upon it later? – Mackenzie McClane Apr 29 '17 at 3:06
  • @MackenzieMcClane I think, if you're about to refactor, it would be a good idea to completely remove it from this.col, simply to avoid that there's any place in the class where you might forget dealing with that bit and out of a sudden you have debugging work to do. But this opinion is based on the assumption that this bit is solely there for the mentioned formatting purpose. – Thomas Apr 29 '17 at 4:24
  • I already removed it from the code in my project, I'm just wondering if I should make the question on here more specific for others as well, by doing that – Mackenzie McClane Apr 29 '17 at 4:27

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