1

I have a websocketpp-based (which as ASIO-based) server and a pool of threads. I need to allocate some resources (connection to DB and etc) and make sure they will be used exactly in the same thread always.

So, here is what I currently have:

class Server
    : public websocketpp::server<websocketpp::config::asio>
{
    Server();
    //...
    static void onMessage(Server * server,
                          websocketpp::connection_hdl hdl,
                          Server::message_ptr msg);
    //...
};

Server::Server()
{
    // ...some initialization routines.. //
    set_message_handler(
        std::bind(&onMessage,
                  this,
                  std::placeholders::_1,
                  std::placeholders::_2));
    listen(port);
    start_accept();
}

Somewhere at the main() function :

    Server server;

    // estimated thread pool
    std::vector<std::thread> threads;
    threads.reserve(threadsCount);
    for(int i = 0; i < threadsCount; ++i)
    {
        threads.emplace_back(
            [&server]()
            {
                mongo::Client mongo(config); // !HERE!
                server.run();
            });
    }

As you can see a mongo::Client instantiated at every thread. My goal is to pass ref/pointer to it (or any other resource that may be added in future) and receive it in Server::onMessage (as an additional parameter).

I'm completely out of ideas how to do this. Also, I don't want to create allocator interface like mongo::Client * Server::acquire() / Server::release(mongo::Client *), because it requires additional synchronization. My intention is to access (how?) to a some-kind of per-thread "userdata" within the Server::onMessage handler.

1

Thread-local storage may work.

Use, for example, a struct to hold your mongo Client:

struct ThreadData
{
    mongo::Client client;
}

Then, declare a thread-local ThreadData object:

thread_local ThreadData data;

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    Server server;

    // estimated thread pool
    std::vector<std::thread> threads;
    threads.reserve(threadsCount);
    for(int i = 0; i < threadsCount; ++i)
    {
        threads.emplace_back(
            [&server]()
            {
                // 'data' is thread-local
                data.client = mongo::Client(config);
                server.run();
            });
    }
}

Each thread as a thread-local copy of data, so you can access it in Server::onMessage(...) without further synchronization.

1

You might want to take a look at WebSocket++'s broadcast_server example. This is an implementation of a basic broadcaster, which maintains a list of active connections, and any message sent by one of the connections is sent to all connections.

The example utilizes two threads. The main thread handles server events, translating them to "actions" that are added to a queue. A worker thread (created via thread t(bind(&broadcast_server::process_messages,&server_instance))) processes the actions in the queue.

You could create multiple worker threads, each with their own mongo::Client and any other resources, that take received messages from a queue and process them.

  • Very good solution, I think. aaron's approach with thread_local also looks good but have some little cost and probably more complex semantics. Now I'm not sure which is better. – J. Doe May 14 '17 at 18:59

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