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Hello I am relative new in programming and need guidance.

We are on a plantage. I have a number of Fields that contain different amounts of trees. On each field a set of tasks have to be done. The tasks are the same but the time varies since the fields are different sizes. I want to generate a list of tasks that matches the assigned working time for the day best.

I believe this is a Job Shop scheduling problem (NP-hard) but as far as i know it can be solved with brute-force search since the data set is small. How do I generate all combinations within the assigned time and return the best fit? I tried to look at some pseudo code but frankly im quite lost and my attempt is rather poor:

//Brute-force search

// 1. first(P): generate a first candidate solution for P.
// 2. next(P,c): generate the next candidate for P after the current one c.
// 3. valid(P,c): check whether candidate c is a solution for P-
// 4. output(P,c): use the solution c of P as appropriate to the application.

public static ArrayList<Task> generatedList2(int totalTime) {  
    ArrayList<Task> bestFit = new ArrayList<>(); 
    ArrayList<Task> tmpFit = new ArrayList<>();
    int tmpTime = 0;
    int bestFitTime = -1;

    Task testTask = new Task("TestTask", 0);
    bestFit.add(testTask);                              //1

        for(Field f : fields) {                         //2
            for(Task t : f.getUndoneTasks()) {
                if(f.getTaskTime(t) < totalTime) {
                    tmpFit.add(t);
                    tmpTime += f.getTaskTime(t);
                    totalTime -= f.getTaskTime(t);
                }
            }
            if(tmpTime < bestFitTime) {                 //3
                bestFit = new ArrayList<Task>(tmpFit);  
                bestFitTime = tmpTime;
                tmpFit.clear();
            }
            else {
                tmpFit.clear();
            }
        }


    return bestFit;                                     //4
}

Updated solution:

public static ArrayList<Task> RecursivelyGetAnswer(ArrayList<Task> listSoFar, 
ArrayList<Task> masterList, ArrayList<Task> bestList, int limit, int index) {

    for (int i = index; i < masterList.size(); i++) {

        Task task = masterList.get(i);
        double listSoFarTotal = getTotal(listSoFar) + task.getTaskLength();

        if (listSoFarTotal <= limit) {
            int bestListTotal = getTotal(bestList);

            listSoFar.add(task);

            if (listSoFarTotal > bestListTotal) {
                bestList = new ArrayList<Task>(listSoFar);
            }
            else if(100 - ((float) (limit - bestListTotal)/bestListTotal * 100) > 95) {
                break;
            }

            bestList = RecursivelyGetAnswer(listSoFar, masterList, bestList, limit, i+1);

            listSoFar.remove(task);
        }
    }

    return bestList;
}
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  • Are you limited to working on one field in a day? – D M Apr 29 '17 at 21:34
  • No I'm not however my code might suggest that. I dont know how to contrsuct it so you can work on all fields. – J.Kirk. Apr 29 '17 at 21:57
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I came up with a recursive solution. For the purposes of my solution, I assumed that you just had a list of tasks, instead of tasks inside fields.

import java.util.ArrayList;

class Task
{
    public int taskLength;

    public Task(int taskLength)
    {
        this.taskLength = taskLength;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return "T" + taskLength;
    }
}

public class Answers 
{   
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        ArrayList masterList = new ArrayList();
        //Add some sample data
        masterList.add(new Task(555));
        masterList.add(new Task(1054));
        masterList.add(new Task(888));
        masterList.add(new Task(5923));
        masterList.add(new Task(2342));
        masterList.add(new Task(6243));
        masterList.add(new Task(9227));
        masterList.add(new Task(4111));
        masterList.add(new Task(4322));
        masterList.add(new Task(782));

        final int limit = 9999;

        ArrayList<Task> bestList = RecursivelyGetAnswer(new ArrayList<>(), masterList, new ArrayList<>(), limit, 0);

        System.out.println(bestList.toString());
        System.out.println(getTotal(bestList));
    }

    public static ArrayList<Task> RecursivelyGetAnswer(ArrayList<Task> listSoFar, ArrayList<Task> masterList, ArrayList<Task> bestList, int limit, int index)
    {
        for (int i = index; i < masterList.size(); i++)
        {
            Task task = masterList.get(i);
            if (getTotal(listSoFar) + task.taskLength <= limit)
            {
                listSoFar.add(task);
                if (getTotal(listSoFar) > getTotal(bestList))
                {
                    bestList = new ArrayList(listSoFar);
                }

                bestList = RecursivelyGetAnswer(listSoFar, masterList, bestList, limit, i+1);

                listSoFar.remove(task);
            }
        }

        return bestList;
    }

    // Given a list of tasks, get the sum of the lengths of the tasks.
    public static int getTotal(ArrayList<Task> myList)
    {
        int sum = 0;
        for (Task t:myList)
            sum += t.taskLength;
        return sum;
    }
}
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  • Thank you a lot for your answer that is a very clean solution. How would I proceed if I actually have an arraylist of tasks fields? – J.Kirk. Apr 30 '17 at 13:53
  • 1
    I have one parameter for "index"; you might need two - one for the index of the field, and one for the index of the task within the field. The main thing is that the recursion doesn't try to look at something it's already done. – D M Apr 30 '17 at 18:16
  • Thank you. I have a follow up question if you don't mind. If each task is a time element that means all possible combinations of let's say 10 tasks is 10!. As I understand this is the concept behind the brute-force search. You find all combinations then choose the best. In my case we have a constraint saying that it has to be <= limit, so it doesn't necessarily go through all combinations? How can I print out the number of combinations that it made? I tried to make a counter but can't quite seem to make it work accurately. – J.Kirk. May 1 '17 at 13:13
  • 1
    Yes, the code uses a shortcut. If the limit is 9999, and you see that the first two tasks already sum up to 12000, there's no need to check what tasks 1+2+x will be - you already know it's going to be over the limit. So it doesn't actually check x! combinations - the number will normally be somewhat smaller in most cases. I guess every time it runs getTotal it's checking a combination, one way or another... – D M May 1 '17 at 15:25
  • 1
    Hmm, that code could probably be made more efficient by calling getTotal once instead of twice, come to think of it. – D M May 1 '17 at 15:30

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