2

I am trying to make code in a windows form application (visual studios) that should take in text from a text box and check if it is saying something in peculiar and do the operation the text box says, for example if it says "1 + 1" the other text box (in the code it is called "output") should say "2". please check my code and just saying I am a beginner. Also i did try a few things like "Convert.ToBoolean(string)" but it didn't work.

      private void TextEditor_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        TextEditor.Text = "";
        Convert.ToBoolean(TextEditor);

        if (TextEditor.Text = "1 + 1")
        {
            Output.Text = "2";
        }

    }
  • Convert.ToBoolean(); is a function and your are eating up the returned value. Also the argument shouldn't be of type Control like in your case, but something that can be converted into boolean. – ja72 Apr 29 '17 at 22:55
5

First of all: I don't think you need the line (actually, you're not even using the return value of ToBoolean)

Convert.ToBoolean(TextEditor);

Secondly, you'd get an exception thrown, as you can't convert a textBox to a boolean value - you'd have to something like this:

Convert.ToBoolean(TextEditor.Text);

But I don't think this is useful in this context, so leave it away.

Thirdly, you only used one equality operator - this should do:

if (TextEditor.Text == "1 + 1")
//...

Otherwise you assign the text of the texteditor with "1+1" and check afterwards wether the assignment result (this is what was assigned, so in that case it's "1 + 1") is true. Obviously, as the assignment was a string, it can't be true, so the compiler tells you that you can't convert a string ("1 + 1") to bool.

Anyway, if you want to write a calculator, I wouldn't hardcode every result of every calculation. E.g. for addition you could do something like this:

Output.Text = TextEditor.Text.Split('+').Select(s => Convert.ToInt32(s.Trim())).Sum().ToString();

This takes the text, splits it at the + sign (It'd be the same for subtraction or other stuff), converts the (trimmed) operands to integers and sums them, using LINQ.

However, as your numbers could be wrong (your comment pointed to something like that), you should surround this with a try catch - and, as you don't want an empty input to result in an error, you could add the RemoveEmptyEntries option:

try
{
    Output.Text = TextEditor.Text.Split(new []{'+'}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries).Select(s => Convert.ToInt32(s.Trim())).Sum().ToString();
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Output.Text = "Wrong input!";
}
  • 1
    Superb answer, this should be accepted as correct. – EJoshuaS Apr 29 '17 at 23:06
  • 1
    @MetaColon thankyou – Drumming Ace Apr 29 '17 at 23:06
  • @MetaColon but the way you did "Output.Text = TextEditor.Text.Split('+').Select(s => Convert.ToInt32(s.Trim())).Sum();" iot gives an error saying you can't implicitly convert string to integer – Drumming Ace Apr 29 '17 at 23:13
  • 1
    Why are the answers all saying that the compiler should complain about Convert.ToBoolean being passed a Control? Sure it makes no sense and you'd get a runtime error. But it will compile; the method has an overload which accepts an object msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/wh2c31dd(v=vs.110).aspx (though it will throw if not IConvertible) – pinkfloydx33 Apr 29 '17 at 23:30
  • 1
    @MetaColon it is i don't know why it did that! there i fixed it! you were the greatest help i could ever ask for i am sorry that this happened. My humble apologize – Drumming Ace May 5 '17 at 22:28
3

if requires a Boolean operator, in this case '==' :)

if (TextEditor.Text == "1 + 1")
2

A few things:

    TextEditor.Text = "";

You don't want to do this because you're clearing out whatever the user entered.

    Convert.ToBoolean(TextEditor);

This isn't needed because you don't store or use the result. It won't actually convert TextEditor to a boolean "in place." Also, this shouldn't compile, it should be TextEditor.Text.

    if (TextEditor.Text = "1 + 1")

As others have indicated, this is assignment (not comparison), which is the cause of the problem. This is like saying

if ("1 + 1")

which isn't a boolean.

Also, as others have indicated, you don't want to hardcode this because what if people did, for example, "1 + 2"? Also, what if they typed it differently, like "1+1"?

0

Looks like you're trying to build an interpreter. You should look into Regular Expressions and Expression Trees. I won't lie, it's not very simple, but the result will be awesome if you follow through. You could create your own language on top of C#.

  • You don't really need regular expressions here I don't think. – EJoshuaS Apr 29 '17 at 23:05
  • I think he provided the "1 + 1 should result in 2" as an example of an acceptable operation. I may have read too much into the question though. I thought maybe the author wanted at least something like "[value_0][0 or more spaces][operator][0 or more spaces][value_1]". And maybe more. I may have read way too much into it now that I think of it. – FinnTheHuman Apr 29 '17 at 23:12
  • You can't use RegEx to do a full arithmetic parser anyway because it requires recursion. – EJoshuaS Apr 29 '17 at 23:16
  • I heard compilers and interpreters use Regular Expressions to do their job, but I may be wrong. – FinnTheHuman Apr 29 '17 at 23:29
  • No, parsers don't work that way, they need to use recursion. – EJoshuaS Apr 29 '17 at 23:36

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