3

I am not sure if this should be posted on R-devel (if so, just let me know...) but there seems to be at least a mistake in the documentation of R's eval() function, which is essential for R's Non Standard evaluation features, or what am I getting wrong?

> eval   
function (expr, envir = parent.frame(), enclos = if (is.list(envir) || 
    is.pairlist(envir)) parent.frame() else baseenv()) 
.Internal(eval(expr, envir, enclos))
<bytecode: 0x0000000009534280>
<environment: namespace:base>

This and also this part of eval's help on the enclos argument

> Relevant when envir is a (pair)list or a data frame. Specifies the
enclosure, i.e., where R looks for objects not found in envir. This can be
NULL (interpreted as the base package environment, baseenv()) or an
environment.

indicates that whenever a list is supplied to eval()'s envir argument, the value of enclos is (lazily) evaluated to parent.frame(), so it should be the same as supplying parent.frame() additionally (but this time directly). However, note that the following two code chunks where I only change this, don't return the same.

> rm(list = ls(all = TRUE))
> f1 <- function(){
   y <- 2
   f2 <- function(){
     eval(quote(y), envir = list())
   }
   f2
 }
> f3 <- f1()
> f3()
[1] 2

and

> rm(list = ls(all = TRUE))
> f1 <- function(){
   y <- 2
   f2 <- function(){
     eval(quote(y), envir = list(),
          enclos = parent.frame())
   }
   f2
 }
> f3 <- f1()
> f3()
Error in eval(expr, envir, enclos) : object 'y' not found 

So the only conclusion I can get from here is that it seems, that for data frames and lists the enclosing environment per default is not the parent.env(). Instead it seems that R is looking in the current execution environment. Here the only relevant part that I can find in ?eval on that:

> When evaluating expressions in a data frame that has been passed as an
argument to a function, the relevant enclosure is often the caller's 
environment, i.e., one needs eval(x, data, parent.frame()).

Which somehow indicates, that one should set parent.frame() explicitly. And that the indicated behaviour above is indeed not what eval() does by default...(at least for the case, when envir is set to a list/pairlist).

For me this is very confusing. However, I am not sure if I get something wrong and would appreciate any answer or comment on that.

  • 1
    I guess the difference between those two is in what is captured as parent.frame() -- passing "enclos" explicitly will evaluate the parent.frame() at the time f3 is called (.GlobalEnv in the first case; i.e. the parent of f3's environment) while a missing "enclos" will evaluate to the parent of eval; i.e. the current running environment of f3. As a simple example note the difference between fA()() and fB()() from ... – alexis_laz Apr 30 '17 at 12:45
  • 1
    ... f0 = function(e) print(e); f1 = function(e = parent.frame()) f0(e); fA = function() function() { print(parent.frame()); print(environment()); f1() } ; fB = function() function() { print(parent.frame()); print(environment()); f1(parent.frame()) } – alexis_laz Apr 30 '17 at 12:45
  • @alexis_laz Thanks a lot! This really helped. If you post this as an anwswer, I will mark it. It's also really interesting, that there is a general distinction between default and supplied arguments as stated here: stackoverflow.com/questions/15504960/… and here: cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/r-release/… – Taz May 1 '17 at 9:46
3

For this specific example, in the first case, the definition of f3 is:

f3
#function(){
#     eval(quote(y), envir = list())
#   }
#<environment: 0x02a41584>

The default enclos = parent.frame() argument will be evaluated in the evaluation frame (i.e. "inside") of eval -- the parent of evals current environment is the current environment() of its wrapper function (f3). And its wrapper function "remembers" where it was created and searches for the y correctly to find it.

In the second case, f3 is defined as:

f3
#function(){
#     eval(quote(y), envir = list(),
#          enclos = parent.frame())
#   }
#<environment: 0x02a4e5e4>

Here, enclos = parent.frame() is evaluated in the evaluation environment() of f3 and, upon calling f3(), its parent is the .GlobalEnv where there is no y.

As a clearer example (yet equally nested as the example) we could consider:

f0 = function(e) print(e)
f1 = function(e = parent.frame()) f0(e)
fA = function() #returns a function
{
    function() 
    { 
        print(parent.frame())
        print(environment())
        f1() 
    }
}   
fB = function() # returns a function
{
    function() 
    { 
        print(parent.frame())
        print(environment())
        f1(parent.frame()) 
    }
}   

And call:

fA()()
#<environment: R_GlobalEnv>  #<- parent of `fA()`'s `environment()`
#<environment: 0x06ff25bc>   #<- current env of `fA()`
#<environment: 0x06ff25bc>   #<- parent of `f1` == current of `fA()`

fB()()
#<environment: R_GlobalEnv>  #<- parent of `fA()`'s `environment()`
#<environment: 0x06fec304>   #<- current env of `fA()`
#<environment: R_GlobalEnv>  #<- parent is `eval`ed as parent of `fA()`'s current

As Taz notes, the distinction between default and supplied arguments is stated in the definition manual. Fooling a bit around we could see it in action by trying to reach the promises of arguments:

First, a helper function to access the promises of current arguments:

.ff = inline::cfunction(sig = c(symarg = "symbol", env = "environment", penv = "environment"), body = '
    SEXP arg = findVar(symarg, env), ans = allocVector(VECSXP, 5);
    SET_VECTOR_ELT(ans, 0, PRCODE(arg)); 
    SET_VECTOR_ELT(ans, 1, PRENV(arg));
    SET_VECTOR_ELT(ans, 2, eval(PRCODE(arg), PRENV(arg)));
    SET_VECTOR_ELT(ans, 3, env);
    SET_VECTOR_ELT(ans, 4, penv);
    return(ans);
')

And the function whose arguments we 'll track:

ff = function(arg = parent.frame())
{
    ans = setNames(.ff(quote(arg), environment(), parent.frame()), 
                   c("expr", "envir", "val", "cur", "par"))

    cat(sprintf("promise:\n\tcall: '%s'\n\tsearched at: '%s'\n\tfound as: '%s'\ncurrent: '%s'\nparent: '%s'\n%s\n", 
                deparse(ans$expr), capture.output(ans$envir), 
                capture.output(ans$val), capture.output(ans$cur),
                capture.output(ans$par), strrep("-", 40)))

    return(invisible(ans))
}

And a simple example:

ff()
#promise:
#        call: 'parent.frame()'
#        searched at: '<environment: 0x06fff594>'
#        found as: '<environment: R_GlobalEnv>'
#current: '<environment: 0x06fff594>'
#parent: '<environment: R_GlobalEnv>'
#----------------------------------------

ff(parent.frame())
#promise:
#        call: 'parent.frame()'
#        searched at: '<environment: R_GlobalEnv>'
#        found as: '<environment: R_GlobalEnv>'
#current: '<environment: 0x06fcce20>'
#parent: '<environment: R_GlobalEnv>'
#----------------------------------------

Or a more nested case:

fnest1 = function() ff()
fnest2 = function() ff(parent.frame())

fnest1()
#promise:
#        call: 'parent.frame()'
#        searched at: '<environment: 0x028d1ccc>'
#        found as: '<environment: 0x028d1d20>'
#current: '<environment: 0x028d1ccc>'
#parent: '<environment: 0x028d1d20>'
#----------------------------------------

fnest2()
#promise:
#        call: 'parent.frame()'
#        searched at: '<environment: 0x026866b8>'
#        found as: '<environment: R_GlobalEnv>'
#current: '<environment: 0x0268662c>'
#parent: '<environment: 0x026866b8>'
#----------------------------------------

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