6

If __anext__ gives control back to event loop (via an await, or call_soon/call_later), is it possible for another __anext__ to be called on the same instance, while first one had not resolved yet, or they would be queued? Are there any other cases where it would be unsafe to assume that only one __anext__ is running at the same time?

3 Answers 3

5

Short answer: Using async for does not overlap, but calling __anext__ does.

Long answer:

Here is what I made while playing with __anext__ mechanics:

import asyncio

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.state = 0

    def __aiter__(self):
        return self

    def __anext__(self):
        def later():
            try:
                print(f'later: called when state={self.state}')

                self.state += 1
                if self.state == 3:
                    future.set_exception(StopAsyncIteration())
                else:
                    future.set_result(self.state)
            finally:
                print(f'later: left when state={self.state}')

        print(f'__anext__: called when state={self.state}')
        try:
            future = asyncio.Future()

            loop.call_later(0.1, later)

            return future
        finally:
            print(f'__anext__: left when state={self.state}')

async def main():
    print('==== async for ====')
    foo = Foo()
    async for x in foo:
        print('>', x)

    print('==== __anext__() ====')
    foo = Foo()
    a = foo.__anext__()
    b = foo.__anext__()
    c = foo.__anext__()
    print('>', await a)
    print('>', await b)
    print('>', await c)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(main())
loop.run_until_complete(asyncio.gather(*asyncio.Task.all_tasks()))
loop.close()

I had implemented __anext__ to return future instead of just being async def, so I have better control of intermediate steps of resolving these futures.

Here is an output:

==== async for ====
__anext__: called when state=0
__anext__: left when state=0
later: called when state=0
later: left when state=1
> 1
__anext__: called when state=1
__anext__: left when state=1
later: called when state=1
later: left when state=2
> 2
__anext__: called when state=2
__anext__: left when state=2
later: called when state=2
later: left when state=3
==== __anext__() ====
__anext__: called when state=0
__anext__: left when state=0
__anext__: called when state=0
__anext__: left when state=0
__anext__: called when state=0
__anext__: left when state=0
later: called when state=0
later: left when state=1
later: called when state=1
later: left when state=2
later: called when state=2
later: left when state=3
> 1
> 2
~~~ dies with StopAsyncIteration ~~~

In async for case it can be seen that __anext__ completes first, then event loop kicks in and runs whatever was scheduled with a delay. If __anext__s were stacking, event loop would take this opportunity to schedule another __anext__ call until delayed later would start - instead, event loop blocks until it's later's time to run.

So, if your async iterator is only to be used in async for, it's safe to assume that there would be only one __anext__ running at the same time.

With __anext__ it's worse: you can stack them up as much as you'd like. However, this shouldn't be of much concern, if your __anext__ is coroutine - it shouldn't keep any state when invoked anyway. Or at least I think so.

1
  • As worded, your answer is no responsive to the original question. The question talks about awaiting within the anext. I think what you do is isomorphic to that, but your answer would be significantly better if you reworded to help the reader be convinced of that. Apr 30, 2017 at 15:24
2

Now that we have asynchronous generators, I wondered what the answer to this question was for concurrent calls to __anext__() when the implementation is provided by an asynchronous generator. I tried the following test program:

import itertools
import trio

async def foo():
  for i in itertools.count():
    await trio.sleep(1)
    yield i

async def go(aiter):
  return (await aiter.__anext__())

async def amain():
  aiter = foo().__aiter__()
  async with trio.open_nursery() as nursery:
    nursery.start_soon(go, aiter)
    nursery.start_soon(go, aiter)

trio.run(amain)

This fails with:

RuntimeError: anext(): asynchronous generator is already running

As far as I can tell, this comes from CPython and not trio. So in CPython at least, I believe that concurrent calls to the __anext__() created automatically from an asynchronous generator are checked for and not permitted. Presumably it is up to the caller to make sure this doesn't happen.

I haven't been able to find a definitive specification that says that the behaviour must be like this, so perhaps this shouldn't be relied upon. Ensuring that the caller never does this seems to be the reliable bet.

0

Yes, this is possible to executed multiple __anext__ tasks simultaneously. As with any other generator, every call to __anext__ will execute until first yield (await is yield from).

Whether this is safe or unsafe depends on the implementation:

  1. Implementation that enforces order via queue or other synchronization primitive will be safe
  2. Implementation whose __anext__ uses internal state should be safe, but order of the results will undefined
  3. Implementation that modifies shared state will be unsafe

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