97

I want to make the Navigation Bar stick to the top once I scroll to it, but it's not working and I have no clue why. If you can please help, here is my HTML and CSS code:

.nav-selections {
        text-transform: uppercase;
        letter-spacing: 5px;
        font: 18px "lato",sans-serif;
        display: inline-block;
        text-decoration: none;
        color: white;
        padding: 18px;
        float: right;
        margin-left: 50px;
        transition: 1.5s;
    }

        .nav-selections:hover{
            transition: 1.5s;
            color: black;
        }

    ul {
        background-color: #B79b58;
        overflow: auto;
    }

    li {
        list-style-type: none;
    }
<nav style="position: sticky; position: -webkit-sticky;">
        <ul align="left">
            <li><a href="#/contact" class="nav-selections" style="margin-right:35px;">Contact</a></li>
            <li><a href="#/about" class="nav-selections">About</a></li>
            <li><a href="#/products" class="nav-selections">Products</a></li>
            <li><a href="#" class="nav-selections">Home</a></li>
        </ul>
    </nav>

14 Answers 14

120

Sticky positioning is a hybrid of relative and fixed positioning. The element is treated as relative positioned until it crosses a specified threshold, at which point it is treated as fixed positioned.
...
You must specify a threshold with at least one of top, right, bottom, or left for sticky positioning to behave as expected. Otherwise, it will be indistinguishable from relative positioning. [source: MDN]

So in your example, you have to define the position where it should stick in the end by using the top property.

html, body {
  height: 200%;
}

nav {
  position: sticky;
  position: -webkit-sticky;
  top: 0; /* required */
}

.nav-selections {
  text-transform: uppercase;
  letter-spacing: 5px;
  font: 18px "lato", sans-serif;
  display: inline-block;
  text-decoration: none;
  color: white;
  padding: 18px;
  float: right;
  margin-left: 50px;
  transition: 1.5s;
}

.nav-selections:hover {
  transition: 1.5s;
  color: black;
}

ul {
  background-color: #B79b58;
  overflow: auto;
}

li {
  list-style-type: none;
}
<nav>
  <ul align="left">
    <li><a href="#/contact" class="nav-selections" style="margin-right:35px;">Contact</a></li>
    <li><a href="#/about" class="nav-selections">About</a></li>
    <li><a href="#/products" class="nav-selections">Products</a></li>
    <li><a href="#" class="nav-selections">Home</a></li>
  </ul>
</nav>

  • 56
    In general, this answer is not enough to sticky to work, parent also should not have overflow property. – ViliusL Apr 10 '18 at 7:41
  • Thank you for your comment. I agree with you that for other examples than the OP's my answer might not be sufficient. The other answers point this out :) – Marvin Apr 10 '18 at 7:49
  • I think the trick is that position sticky can only be applied to the children which belongs to a scrollable parent with a known height, (a direct children in a flexbox has a know height which is computed from other flex-item) – code4j Apr 13 at 14:11
  • position: sticky won't work in IE11 – Tristanisginger Apr 19 at 16:25
192

Check if an ancestor element has overflow set (e.g. overflow:hidden); try toggling it. You may have to go up the DOM tree higher than you expect =).

This may affect your position:sticky on a descendant element.

  • 18
    Wish I could upvote you multiple times! This has bitten me more often than I'd care to admit. – Alexander Varwijk Jan 15 '18 at 13:24
  • 2
    This is the right answer. However, it can be difficult to find which parent element is causing the problem. I wrote a jquery script to help identify the overflow property on parents which identified the problem (just run it in your console). Because the script is a few lines I've added an answer containing the script below. – danday74 Jul 7 '18 at 10:07
  • 5
    I missed the "s" in your "parent elements" – che-azeh Jul 16 '18 at 17:53
  • 3
    I also missed the "s":( and that was the issue. In many places people write that you should check only parent not all parents. I found my issue by checking if calling $(stickyElement).parents().css("overflow", "visible") in web console would help and it did. Then I located the distant parent with overflow:hidden style that caused the problem. I wish I read this answer more carefully. – Mariusz Pawelski Jul 24 '18 at 16:56
  • Very important that you may have to go higher up the DOM tree than expected. I usually set my <html> tag to overflow-x: hidden and this can prevent vertical sticky behavior way down the DOM tree. – J.McLaren May 24 at 1:27
75

I have same problem, and i found the answer here.

If your element isn't sticking as expected the first thing to check are the rules applied to the container.

Specifically, look for any overflow property set on the parent. You can't use: overflow: hidden, overflow: scroll or overflow: auto on the parent of a position: sticky element.

  • This is also the right answer but also see my answer which helps to easily identify the parent causing the problem. – danday74 Jul 7 '18 at 10:09
  • 2
    You should check not only closest parent container but all parent elements. – Mariusz Pawelski Jul 24 '18 at 16:58
  • yes, see my answer to do exactly that and check ALL parents very quickly – danday74 Jul 28 '18 at 10:12
  • The link helped me, too. My problem was solved by "...If you're not using overflow and still having problems it's worth checking if a height is set on the parent..." – xenetics Oct 18 '18 at 2:23
20

Few more things I've come across:

When your sticky element is a component (angular etc)

  • If the 'sticky' element itself is a component with a custom element-selector, such as an angular component named <app-menu-bar> you will need to add the following to the component's css:

    :host { display: block; }   
    

    or

    app-menu-bar  { display: block; }   // (in the containing component's css)
    

    Safari on iOS in particular seems to require display:block even on the root element app-root of an angular application or it won't stick.

  • If you are creating a component and defining the css inside the component (shadow DOM / encapsulated styles), make sure the position: sticky is being applied to the 'outer' selector (eg. app-menu-bar in devtools should show the sticky position) and not a top level div within the component. With Angular, this can be achieved with the :host selector in the css for your component.

    :host
    {
        position: sticky;
        display: block;   // this is the same as shown above
        top: 0;
        background: red;    
    }
    

Other

  • If the element following your sticky element has a solid background, you must add the following to stop it from sliding underneath:

    .sticky-element { z-index: 100; }
    .parent-of-sticky-element { position: relative; }
    
  • Your sticky element must be first (before your content) if using top and after it if using bottom.

  • There are complications when using overflow: hidden on your wrapper element – in general it will kill the sticky element inside. Better explained in this question

  • Mobile browsers may disable sticky/fixed positioned items when the onscreen keyboard is visible. I'm not sure of the exact rules (does anybody ever know) but when the keyboard is visible you're looking at a sort of 'window' into the window and you won't easily be able to get things to stick to the actual visible top of the screen.

  • Make sure you have:

    position: sticky;

    and not

    display: sticky;

Misc usability concerns

  • Be cautious if your design calls for for sticking things to the bottom of the screen on mobile devices. On iPhone X for instance they display a narrow line to indicate the swipe region (to get back to the homepage) - and elements inside this region aren't clickable. So if you stick something there be sure to test on iPhone X that users can activate it. A big 'Buy Now' button is no good if people can't click it!
  • If you're advertising on Facebook the webpage is displayed in a 'webview' control within Facebook's mobile apps. Especially when displaying video (where your content begins in the bottom half of the screen only) - they often completely mess up sticky elements by putting your page within a scrollable viewport that actually allows your sticky elements to disappear off the top of the page. Be sure to test in the context of an actual ad and not just in the phone's browser or even Facebook's browser which can all behave differently.
  • @Sergey I'm not absolutely clear which of display: block and position: relative triggers the correct behavior in Safari - did it seem that only display: block was needed? Of course it probably doesn't hurt to have both specified – Simon_Weaver Jun 28 '18 at 20:06
  • 1
    Just display: block was enough – Sergey Jun 28 '18 at 20:30
13

This is a continuation of the answers from MarsAndBack and Miftah Mizwar.

Their answers are correct. However, it is difficult to identify the problem ancestor(s).

To make this very simple, simply run this jQuery script in your browser console and it will tell you the value of the overflow property on every ancestor.

$('.your-sticky-element').parents().filter(function() {
    console.log($(this));
    console.log($(this).css('overflow'));
    return $(this).css('overflow') === 'hidden';
});

Where an ancestor does not have overflow: visible change its CSS so that it does!

Also, as stated elsewhere, make sure your sticky element has this in the CSS:

.your-sticky-element {
    position: sticky;
    top: 0;
}
  • 1
    That was very helpful. I was able to quickly identify the parent element that had a value of overflow: invisible. – David Brower Sep 25 '18 at 21:01
  • 1
    If you don't have jQuery on your page, you can run this small snippet in the console to add it: (async function() { let response = await fetch('https://code.jquery.com/jquery-3.3.1.min.js'); let script = await response.text(); eval(script); })(); – magikMaker Nov 5 '18 at 16:51
  • 5
    You can also run this snippet that doesn't require JQuery to find non "visible" overflow parent: var p = $0.parentElement; while(p != null) { var ov = getComputedStyle(p).overflow; if(ov !== 'visible') console.warn(ov, p); else console.log(ov, p); p = p.parentElement; } Where $0 is the last element selected in developer tools. – Mariusz Pawelski Jan 2 at 15:54
4

I had to use the following CSS to get it working:

.parent {
    display: flex;
    justify-content: space-around;
    align-items: flex-start;
    overflow: visible;
}

.sticky {
    position: sticky;
    position: -webkit-sticky;
    top: 0;
}

If above dosen't work then...

Go through all ancestors and make sure none of these elements have overflow: hidden. You have to change this to overflow: visible

4

from my comment:

position:sticky needs a coordonate to tel where to stick

nav {
  position: sticky;
  top: 0;
}

.nav-selections {
  text-transform: uppercase;
  letter-spacing: 5px;
  font: 18px "lato", sans-serif;
  display: inline-block;
  text-decoration: none;
  color: white;
  padding: 18px;
  float: right;
  margin-left: 50px;
  transition: 1.5s;
}

.nav-selections:hover {
  transition: 1.5s;
  color: black;
}

ul {
  background-color: #B79b58;
  overflow: auto;
}

li {
  list-style-type: none;
}

body {
  height: 200vh;
}
<nav>
  <ul align="left">
    <li><a href="#/contact" class="nav-selections" style="margin-right:35px;">Contact</a></li>
    <li><a href="#/about" class="nav-selections">About</a></li>
    <li><a href="#/products" class="nav-selections">Products</a></li>
    <li><a href="#" class="nav-selections">Home</a></li>
  </ul>
</nav>

There is polyfill to use for other browsers than FF and Chrome . This is an experimental rules that can be implemented or not at any time through browsers. Chrome add it a couple of years ago and then dropped it, it seems back ... but for how long ?

The closest would be position:relative + coordonates updated while scrolling once reached the sticky point, if you want to turn this into a javascript script

3

It seems like that the navbar to be stickied shouldn't be inside any div or section with other content. None of the solution were working for me until I took the navbar out of the div which the navbar shared with another topbar .I previously had topbar and navbar wrapped with a common div.

  • Thank you, this was what I was looking for! For me there were no parents with overflow, nor were there any height issues. It'd be nice to see this info in the accepted answer as well. – saglamcem Feb 18 at 14:20
1

Funny moment that wasn't obvious for me: at least in Chrome 70 position: sticky is not applied if you've set it using DevTools.

  • Do you have a source for this, or any other information about how to work around this? – AJMansfield Dec 14 '18 at 15:57
1

I know this is an old post. But if there's someone like me that just recently started messing around with position: sticky this can be useful.

In my case i was using position: sticky as a grid-item. It was not working and the problem was an overflow-x: hidden on the html element. As soon as i removed that property it worked fine. Having overflow-x: hidden on the body element seemed to work tho, no idea why yet.

0

two answer here:

  1. remove overflow property from body tag

  2. set height: 100% to the body to fix the problem with overflow-y: auto

min-height: 100% not-working instead of height: 100%

-1

It's TRUE that the overflow needs to be removed or set to initial to make position: sticky works on the child element. I used Material Design in my Angular app and found out that some Material components changed the overflow value. The fix for my scenario is

mat-sidenav-container, mat-sidenav-content {
  overflow: initial;
}
-1

if danday74's fix doesn't work, check that the parent element has a height.

In my case I had two childs, one floating left and one floating right. I wanted the right floating one to become sticky but had to add a <div style="clear: both;"></div> at the end of the parent, to give it height.

-1

I believe this article say a lot about how sticky works

How CSS Position Sticky Really Works! CSS position sticky has two main parts, sticky item & sticky container.

Sticky Item — is the element that we defined with the position: sticky styles. The element will float when the viewport position matches the position definition, for example: top: 0px .

Sticky Container —is the HTML element which wraps the sticky item. This is the maximum area that the sticky item can float in.

When you define an element with position: sticky you’re automatically defining the parent element as a sticky container!

protected by TylerH Jul 25 at 14:25

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