40

We are currently building a Map manually based on the two fields that are returned by a named JPA query because JPA 2.1 only provides a getResultList() method:

@NamedQuery{name="myQuery",query="select c.name, c.number from Client c"}

HashMap<Long,String> myMap = new HashMap<Long,String>();

for(Client c: em.createNamedQuery("myQuery").getResultList() ){
     myMap.put(c.getNumber, c.getName);
}

But, I feel like a custom mapper or similar would be more performant since this list could easily be 30,000+ results.

Any ideas to build a Map without iterating manually.

(I am using OpenJPA, not hibernate)

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  • What would be used as your Map key? – Jim Tough Dec 6 '10 at 22:04
  • Like the code shows,the number field (Long), one of two values returned. BUt I could live with any Type, so long as the key is the number and the value is the name. I added the declaration for more details. – Eddie Dec 6 '10 at 22:09

10 Answers 10

17

There is no standard way to get JPA to return a map.

see related question: JPA 2.0 native query results as map

Iterating manually should be fine. The time to iterate a list/map in memory is going to be small relative to the time to execute/return the query results. I wouldn't try to futz with the JPA internals or customization unless there was conclusive evidence that manual iteration was not workable.

Also, if you have other places where you turn query result Lists into Maps, you probably want to refactor that into a utility method with a parameter to indicate the map key property.

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12

Since this is a common question, I decided to write this article on this topic.

Returning a Map result using JPA Query getResultStream

Since the JPA 2.2 version, you can use the getResultStream Query method to transform the List<Tuple> result into a Map<Integer, Integer>:

Map<Integer, Integer> postCountByYearMap = entityManager
.createQuery(
    "select " +
    "   YEAR(p.createdOn) as year, " +
    "   count(p) as postCount " +
    "from " +
    "   Post p " +
    "group by " +
    "   YEAR(p.createdOn)", Tuple.class)
.getResultStream()
.collect(
    Collectors.toMap(
        tuple -> ((Number) tuple.get("year")).intValue(),
        tuple -> ((Number) tuple.get("postCount")).intValue()
    )
);

Returning a Map result using JPA Query getResultStream

If you're using JPA 2.1 or older versions but your application is running on Java 8 or a newer version, then you can use getResultList and transform the List<Tuple> to a Java 8 stream:

Map<Integer, Integer> postCountByYearMap = entityManager
.createQuery(
    "select " +
    "   YEAR(p.createdOn) as year, " +
    "   count(p) as postCount " +
    "from " +
    "   Post p " +
    "group by " +
    "   YEAR(p.createdOn)", Tuple.class)
.getResultList()
.stream()
.collect(
    Collectors.toMap(
        tuple -> ((Number) tuple.get("year")).intValue(),
        tuple -> ((Number) tuple.get("postCount")).intValue()
    )
);

Returning a Map result using a Hibernate-specific ResultTransformer

Another option is to use the MapResultTransformer class provided by the Hibernate Types open-source project:

Map<Number, Number> postCountByYearMap = (Map<Number, Number>) entityManager
.createQuery(
    "select " +
    "   YEAR(p.createdOn) as year, " +
    "   count(p) as postCount " +
    "from " +
    "   Post p " +
    "group by " +
    "   YEAR(p.createdOn)")
.unwrap(org.hibernate.query.Query.class)
.setResultTransformer(
    new MapResultTransformer<Number, Number>()
)
.getSingleResult();

The MapResultTransformer is suitable for projects still running on Java 6 or using older Hibernate versions.

Avoid returning large result sets

The OP said:

But, I feel like a custom mapper or similar would be more performant since this list could easily be 30,000+ results.

This is a terrible idea. You never need to select 30k records. How would that fit in the UI? Or, why would you operate on such a large batch of records?

You should use query pagination as this will help you reduce the transaction response time and provide better concurrency. Check out this article for more details about the best way to paginate query result sets.

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  • EclipseLink 2.7 refuses to return Tuples, I always get Vector of Objects instead and no information about aliases. – Panu Haaramo Apr 25 at 11:37
  • 1
    I though this is JPA feature, not Hibernate specific. You also did not put it under "Hibernate specific" above. Have you ever tried this with EclipseLink? – Panu Haaramo Apr 25 at 11:45
  • This is a JPA feature, that's why the interface is called javax.persistence.Tuple. It should be supported by any JPA provider. If EclipseLink does not support it, you should open an issue for that. – Vlad Mihalcea Apr 25 at 11:48
  • Creating a new createTupleQuery just to support Tuple sounds so wrong. But then, Hibernate 3 used to default to FetchType.LAZY for all associations, and JPA 1.0 EG considered "a good idea" to use FetchType.EAGER for @ManyToOne and @OneToOne with terrible implications on application performance. It doesn't matter if the Hibernate team voted against it. They were overruled. – Vlad Mihalcea Apr 27 at 15:29
  • 1
    JPA seems only to have added Tuple to criteria query in the specification. The JSR adds footnotes 26+27 explicitly stating JPQL queries do not support other types like tuple: "Applications that specify other result types (e.g., Tuple.class) will not be portable." No reason EclipseLink couldn't support it, but isn't required as part of the spec. – Chris Apr 27 at 15:35
9

You can retrieve a list of java.util.Map.Entry instead. Therefore the collection in your entity should be modeled as a Map:

@OneToMany
@MapKeyEnumerated(EnumType.STRING)
public Map<PhoneType, PhoneNumber> phones;

In the example PhoneType is a simple enum, PhoneNumber is an entity. In your query use the ENTRY keyword that was introduced in JPA 2.0 for map operations:

public List<Entry> getPersonPhones(){
    return em.createQuery("SELECT ENTRY(pn) FROM Person p JOIN p.phones pn",java.util.Map.Entry.class).getResultList();
}

You are now ready to retrieve the entries and start working with it:

List<java.util.Map.Entry> phoneEntries =   personDao.getPersonPhoneNumbers();
for (java.util.Map.Entry<PhoneType, PhoneNumber> entry: phoneEntries){
    //entry.key(), entry.value()
}

If you still need the entries in a map but don't want to iterate through your list of entries manually, have a look on this post Convert Set<Map.Entry<K, V>> to HashMap<K, V> which works with Java 8.

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2

This works fine.
Repository code :

@Repository
public interface BookRepository extends CrudRepository<Book,Id> {

    @Query("SELECT b.name, b.author from Book b")
    List<Object[]> findBooks();
}

service.java

      List<Object[]> list = bookRepository.findBooks();
                for (Object[] ob : list){
                    String key = (String)ob[0];
                    String value = (String)ob[1];
}

link https://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/1409/jpa-query-to-return-a-map

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  • 2
    this is exactly what OP want's to avoid – Kamil Bęben May 27 '19 at 9:11
  • 1
    @KamilBęben a customer mapper would also be doing the same stuff behind the scenes. – Mr Nobody May 27 '19 at 14:44
1
Map<String,Object> map = null;
    try {
        EntityManager entityManager = getEntityManager();
        Query query = entityManager.createNativeQuery(sql);
            query.setHint(QueryHints.RESULT_TYPE, ResultType.Map);
        map = (Map<String,Object>) query.getSingleResult();
    }catch (Exception e){ }

 List<Map<String,Object>> list = null;
    try {
        EntityManager entityManager = getEntityManager();
        Query query = entityManager.createNativeQuery(sql);
            query.setHint(QueryHints.RESULT_TYPE, ResultType.Map);
            list = query.getResultList();
    }catch (Exception e){  }
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0

With custom result class and a bit of Guava, this is my approach which works quite well:

public static class SlugPair {
    String canonicalSlug;
    String slug;

    public SlugPair(String canonicalSlug, String slug) {
        super();
        this.canonicalSlug = canonicalSlug;
        this.slug = slug;
    }

}

...

final TypedQuery<SlugPair> query = em.createQuery(
    "SELECT NEW com.quikdo.core.impl.JpaPlaceRepository$SlugPair(e.canonicalSlug, e.slug) FROM "
      + entityClass.getName() + " e WHERE e.canonicalSlug IN :canonicalSlugs",
    SlugPair.class);

query.setParameter("canonicalSlugs", canonicalSlugs);

final Map<String, SlugPair> existingSlugs = 
    FluentIterable.from(query.getResultList()).uniqueIndex(
        new Function<SlugPair, String>() {
    @Override @Nullable
    public String apply(@Nullable SlugPair input) {
        return input.canonicalSlug;
    }
});
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0

using java 8 (+) you can get results as a list of array object (each column will from select will have same index on results array) by hibernate entity manger, and then from results list into stream, map results into entry (key, value), then collect them into map of same type.

 final String sql = "SELECT ID, MODE FROM MODES";
     List<Object[]> result = entityManager.createNativeQuery(sql).getResultList();
        return result.stream()
                .map(o -> new AbstractMap.SimpleEntry<>(Long.valueOf(o[0].toString()), String.valueOf(o[1])))
                .collect(Collectors.toMap(Map.Entry::getKey, Map.Entry::getValue));
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0

in case java 8 there built in entry "CustomEntryClass"

  • since return is stream, then caller function (repoistory layer) must have @Transactional(readonly=true|false) annotation, otherwithe exception will be thrown

  • make sure you will use full qualified name of class CustomEntryClass...

    @Query("select new CustomEntryClass(config.propertyName, config.propertyValue) " +
                        "from ClientConfigBO config where config.clientCode =:clientCode ")
                Stream<CustomEntryClass<String, String>> getByClientCodeMap(@Param("clientCode") String clientCode);
    
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-1

Please refer, JPA 2.0 native query results as map

In your case in Postgres, it would be something like,

List<String> list = em.createNativeQuery("select cast(json_object_agg(c.number, c.name) as text) from schema.client c")
                   .getResultList();

//handle exception here, this is just sample
Map map = new ObjectMapper().readValue(list.get(0), Map.class);

Kindly note, I am just sharing my workaround with Postgres.

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-2

How about this ?

@NamedNativeQueries({
@NamedNativeQuery(
  name="myQuery",
  query="select c.name, c.number from Client c",
  resultClass=RegularClient.class
)
})

and

     public static List<RegularClient> runMyQuery() {
     return entityManager().createNamedQuery("myQuery").getResultList();
 }
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  • @zawhut - thanks, but this still returns a list.. The issue is that I need to use the results inside another method and need a fast lookup method.. I thought a map woul be the best way to do this. – Eddie Dec 20 '10 at 14:31
  • OP asked for a Map – user1445967 Oct 28 '19 at 18:39

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