79

I am using this code to check undefined variable but it's not working.

var  uemail = localStorage.getItem("useremail");

if (typeof uemail === "undefined")
{
    alert('undefined');
}
else
{
    alert('defined');
}

11 Answers 11

75

In Typescript 2 you can use Undefined type to check for undefined values. So if you declare a variable as:

let uemail : string | undefined;

Then you can check if the variable z is undefined as:

if(uemail === undefined)
{

}
2
  • 3
    This is not helpful. The original poster wants to check if a specific value exists in localStorage or not. localStorage.getItem() returns null if the item has not been set before. This would not be assignable to string | undefined, as null is a different type. – opyh Jul 27 '19 at 22:57
  • 10
    It answers the question in the title, which is more helpful for most people. But yes, if your goal is to check localStorage, checking for undefined my be the wrong approach. – meustrus May 6 '20 at 21:41
44

You can just check for truthy on this:

if(uemail) {
    console.log("I have something");
} else {
    console.log("Nothing here...");
}

Go and check out the answer from here: Is there a standard function to check for null, undefined, or blank variables in JavaScript?

Hope this helps!

10
  • 63
    If uemail equals zero, that will equate to false, and it will evaluate incorrectly. – Todd Sjolander Jul 23 '18 at 12:59
  • 4
    Correct however in the question the op is using localStorage.getItem("useremail"); which will return null. – Motonstron Jul 30 '18 at 9:08
  • Can be misleading with the title of the post. I do second Todd on that one. – JulienCoo Oct 21 '19 at 13:37
  • if you really expect, the number 0 to be false; then by all means just use it. – Aizzat Suhardi Feb 18 '20 at 3:26
  • Todd is right. Simple "if" does not cover case with value = 0. – Viacheslav Dobromyslov Mar 6 '20 at 4:51
33

From Typescript 3.7 on, you can also use nullish coalescing:

let x = foo ?? bar();

Which is the equivalent for checking for null or undefined:

let x = (foo !== null && foo !== undefined) ?
    foo :
    bar();

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/release-notes/typescript-3-7.html#nullish-coalescing

While not exactly the same, you could write your code as:

var uemail = localStorage.getItem("useremail") ?? alert('Undefined');
1
  • 3
    Good answer. I've recently also discovered this ?? operator. It simplyfies code. But complicates newcomers understanding as well as ... operator. – Viacheslav Dobromyslov Mar 6 '20 at 5:12
11

It's because it's already null or undefined. Null or undefined does not have any type. You can check if it's is undefined first. In typescript (null == undefined) is true.

  if (uemail == undefined) {
      alert('undefined');
  } else {
      alert('defined');
  }

or

  if (uemail == null) {
      alert('undefined');
  } else {
      alert('defined');
  }
2
  • 1
    This is only half correct: 1) null and undefined DO have types in TypeScript. 2) While using == comparison has a working logic in this case, the returned value of localStorage.getItem() is never undefined. – opyh Jul 27 '19 at 23:03
  • Yes, I agree bcoz null === undefined is false. But, most of the cases are solved by using == operator. – Nabin Kumar Khatiwada Jun 4 '20 at 6:46
9

Adding this late answer to check for object.propertie that can help in some cases:

Using a juggling-check, you can test both null and undefined in one hit:

if (object.property == null) {

If you use a strict-check, it will only be true for values set to null and won't evaluate as true for undefined variables:

if (object.property === null) {

Typescript does NOT have a function to check if a variable is defined.

Update October 2020

You can now also use the nullish coallesing operator introduced in Typescript.

let neverNullOrUndefined = someValue ?? anotherValue;

Here, anotherValue will only be returned if someValue is null or undefined.

6

It actually is working, but there is difference between null and undefined. You are actually assigning to uemail, which would return a value or null in case it does not exists. As per documentation.

For more information about the difference between the both of them, see this answer.

For a solution to this Garfty's answer may work, depending on what your requirement is. You may also want to have a look here.

2

Late to the story but I think some details are overlooked?

if you use

if (uemail !== undefined) {
  //some function
}

You are, technically, comparing variable uemail with variable undefined and, as the latter is not instantiated, it will give both type and value of 'undefined' purely by default, hence the comparison returns true. But it overlooks the potential that a variable by the name of undefined may actually exist -however unlikely- and would therefore then not be of type undefined. In that case, the comparison will return false.

To be correct one would have to declare a constant of type undefined for example:

const _undefined: undefined

and then test by:

if (uemail === _undefined) {
  //some function
}

This test will return true as uemail now equals both value & type of _undefined as _undefined is now properly declared to be of type undefined.

Another way would be

if (typeof(uemail) === 'undefined') {
  //some function
}

In which case the boolean return is based on comparing the two strings on either end of the comparison. This is, from a technical point of view, NOT testing for undefined, although it achieves the same result.

5
  • 4
    You can't redefine undefined. – Endrju Feb 6 '20 at 11:44
  • @mtholen have you tried to redefine undefined? I've tried and its impossible. – Viacheslav Dobromyslov Mar 6 '20 at 5:09
  • If you are in JavaScript, not TypeScript, you can absolutely redefine undefined. Please don't, though. – meustrus May 6 '20 at 21:42
  • 1
    undefined is its own type in Typescript, it is not an uninstantiated variable. Everything after your initial example is not accurate and you also list no sources. See typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/… on top of this, undefined is a primitive type in javascript as well: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Chris Lang Jul 17 '20 at 21:19
  • 1
    'However, the global variable undefined is not a reserved word and therefore can be redefined. Luckily as of ECMA 5, undefined is not permitted to be redefined, but in previous versions and older browsers it was possible...' davidshariff.com/blog/javascripts-undefined-explored so although you are correct, in modern day browsers, using ecma5 it is not allowed. However in the past this certainly was possible... The post is also to illustrate how this works in JS. But, yes, strictly speaking, if ecma5 is the standard then no undefined cannot be redefined – mtholen Jul 19 '20 at 2:17
1

NOT STRICTLY RELATED TO TYPESCRIPT

Just to add to all the above answers, we can also use the shorthand syntax

var result = uemail || '';

This will give you the email if uemail variable has some value and it will simply return an empty string if uemail variable is undefined.

This gives a nice syntax for handling undefined variables and also provide a way to use a default value in case the variable is undefined.

1

I know that this is not optimal and strange example, but good to know that there is yet another way to check if some value is defined using JSON.stringify

const foo = '';
const buzz = null;
const fooBuzz = 0;
const array = [];
let declared;
const asUndefined = undefined;

if (JSON.stringify(foo)) {
  console.log(foo); // empty string
} else {
  console.log('undefined');
}

if (JSON.stringify(buzz)) {
  console.log(buzz); // null
} else {
  console.log('undefined');
}

if (JSON.stringify(fooBuzz)) {
  console.log(fooBuzz); // 0
} else {
  console.log('undefined');
}

if (JSON.stringify(array)) {
  console.log(array); // []
} else {
  console.log('undefined');
}

if (JSON.stringify(asUndefined)) {
  console.log(asUndefined);
} else {
  console.log('undefined'); // undefined
}

if (JSON.stringify(declared)) {
  console.log(declared);
} else {
  console.log('undefined'); // undefined
}

0

You can check null or undefined as below,

if (!uemail) // it is null or undefined
{
    alert('null or undefined');
}
else
{
    alert('defined');
}
-3

Use 'this' keyword to access variable. This worked for me

var  uemail = localStorage.getItem("useremail");

if (typeof this.uemail === "undefined")
{
    alert('undefined');
}
else
{
    alert('defined');
}
2
  • 1
    While this looked as if it would work, it did not. this.uemail is always undefined, as it refers to a non-existing, different variable than var uemail. – opyh Jul 27 '19 at 22:46
  • You converting the undefined to a string and then compare the strings. You're wasting resources, since you can simply say this.uemail == undefined. – akop Mar 17 at 18:29

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