2
public class JavaCopyFileProgram {



        public static void main(String[] args)
        {    
            File sourceFile = new File("F:/Study/Java/Java Programs/Factory Methods.txt");

            File destFile = new File("D:/DestFile.txt");

            FileInputStream inStream = null;

            FileOutputStream outStream = null;

            try
            {
                inStream = new FileInputStream(sourceFile);

                outStream = new FileOutputStream(destFile);

                byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];

                int length;

                while ((length = inStream.read(buffer)) != -1) 
                { 
                    outStream.write(buffer, 0, length);
                }
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
            finally
            {
                try
                {
                    inStream.close();

                    outStream.close();
                }
                catch (IOException e) 
                {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }

            System.out.println("Success");
        }
    }   

I am not able to understand how is thw write() method working? When it is first invoked then it is writing the cotents from 0 index to length of the byte array but when it is invoked second time then how is it appending the new text to the end of the previous text? It should override the previous content as again write is called with 0 as starting index. Please help me if i am understood something wrong?

2 Answers 2

5

The start offset in the write method does not refer to the offset in the FileOutputStream but to the offset in the array from which you write.

You can read in the documentation of OutputStream (rather than FileOutputStream) how the write method is supposed to be used.

For your specific write method call

outStream.write(buffer, 0, length);

it means: "write out the contents of buffer to stream outStream starting at buffer[0] the next length bytes".

The second and third parameter refer to the bounds of the array. The method will write buffer[0] to buffer[length - 1]. And since you read from inStream again and again (see head of the while loop), the contents of buffer will be filled with consecutive bytes from this input stream. The resulting operation is a file copy here.

3

The simplest form of the write() method is write( byte[] buffer ); it writes the entire buffer into the output stream.

However, it is often the case that we do not want to write an entire buffer, but only a portion of it. That's why the write( byte[] buffer, int offset, int length ) exists.

The code that you provided uses this variant of the write() method because the buffer is not always full, since read() call does not always read an entire buffer, it reads a length number of bytes.

In the code that you posted, the read() method is invoked each time with an offset of 0, which means that it reads bytes from the input stream and stores them into the buffer starting at offset 0. Therefore the write() method needs to also start fetching bytes to write into the output stream starting at offset zero of the buffer. That's why the offset to write is given as zero.

However, if you had a buffer containing 100 bytes, and you only wanted to write the middle 80, then you would have said write( buffer, 10, 80 ).

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