0

I have a true code-first deployment of my data model and I have a need to perform functionality one would normally associate to a view, but I'm not sure how to accomplish it at the moment.

To simplify the problem, my model has things a registered user creates and posts that other users can interact with. I'm devising an algorithm for how popular these things are that boils down to a weighting factor related to the type of interaction times the inverse of some date period.

As an example let's say we have "Likes", "Comments", and "Purchases" with weights of 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Let's also say my time period is 1 week. In that scenario a purchase 3 weeks ago weighs as much as a Like in the current week.

So the relevant parts of the model are the Thing which has a Primary Key and some additional metadata; the InteractionType which has a Primary Key, a Weight value, and some other metadata; the Interaction which has a composite Primary Key (consisting of the Thing Primary Key, User object Primary Key, and InteractionType Primary Key) and a DateValue column and any other contextually related metadata.

Ultimately I want to have an entity framework compatible way to perform the following query:

;WITH InteractionScore
AS
(
  SELECT t.Id ThingId, SUM(it.Weight/CAST(DATEDIFF(wk, i.DateValue, GETDATE()) AS float)) IntScore
  FROM Things t
  INNER JOIN Interactions i ON t.Id = i.ThingId
  INNER JOIN InteractionTypes it ON i.InteractionTypeId = it.Id
  GROUP BY t.ID
)
SELECT TOP(10) t.*
FROM Things t
LEFT JOIN InteractionScore isc ON t.Id = isc.ThingId
ORDER BY ISNULL(isc.IntScore, 0.0) DESC

Data Model Classes are defined as follows:

namespace Project.Entities
{
  public class User
  {
    [Key]
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public string IdentityRef {get;set;}
    public string DisplayName {get;set;}
    [InverseProperty("Owner")]
    public ICollection<Thing> OwnedThings {get; set;}
  }

  public class InteractionType
  {
    [Key]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public double Weight { get; set; }
  }

  public class Thing
  {
    [Key]
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public int OwnerId {get; set;}
    [ForeignKey("OwnerId")]
    public User Owner {get; set;}
    public string Summary {get; set;}
    public string Description {get; set;}
    public ICollection<Interaction> Interactions {get;set;}
  }

  public class Interaction
  {
    public int ThingId { get; set; }
    public int UserId { get; set; }
    public int InteractionTypeId {get; set;}
    public Thing Thing {get; set;}
    public User User {get;set;}
    public InteractionType InteractionType {get;set;}
    public DateTime DateValue {get;set;}  
    public string Comment {get; set;}
    public string PurchaseReference {get;set;}      
  }

}

The DbContext definition in the consuming application

namespace Project.Consumer
{
  public class ApplicationData : DbContext
  {
    public DbSet<User> Users {get;set;}
    public DbSet<Thing> Things {get;set;}        

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder builder)
    {
        base.OnModelCreating(builder);

        builder.Entity<Interaction>()
               .HasKey(i => new {i.ThingId, i.UserId, i.InteractionTypeId});            
    }
  }

  public List<Thing> GetMostPopularThings(ApplicationData ctx)
  {
    return ctx.Things.OrderByDescending(lambdaMagic).Take(10).ToList();
  }
}

The lambdaMagic is snark of course, but as I said, I'm not sure if there is a documented way of doing this and I'm just missing it or what. I've seen the option to do something along the lines of ctx.Things.FromSql("select string or sp here").Take(10).ToList(); and that might be okay, but I really wanted to reduce the number of things that exist outside the project (SP definitions for example)

Since writing this question, I went ahead and created another model class called ThingStatistics:

public class ThingStatistics
{
  [Key]      
  public int ThingId {get; set;}
  [ForeignKey("ThingId")]
  public Thing Thing {get; set;}
  public double InteractionScore {get;set;}
}

Then I augmented the Thing class as follows:

public class Thing
{
    [Key]
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public int OwnerId {get; set;}
    [ForeignKey("OwnerId")]
    public User Owner {get; set;}
    public string Summary {get; set;}
    public string Description {get; set;}
    public ICollection<Interaction> Interactions {get;set;}
    public ThingStatistics Stats {get;set;}
}

I performed the Add-Migration step and then altered the resulting Up/Down as follows:

public partial class AggregationHack : Migration
{
    protected override void Up(MigrationBuilder migrationBuilder)
    {
       migrationBuilder.Sql("GO; CREATE VIEW ThingStatistics AS SELECT t.ID ThingId, ISNULL(it.Weight/CAST(DATEDIFF(wk, i.DateValue, GETDATE()) + 1 AS float), 0) InteractionScore FROM Things t LEFT JOIN Interactions i INNER JOIN InteractionTypes it ON i.InteractionTypeId = it.Id ON t.ID = i.ThingId GROUP BY t.Id; GO;");
    }

    protected override void Down(MigrationBuilder migrationBuilder)
    {
       migrationBuilder.Sql("DROP VIEW ThingStatistics; GO;");
    }
}

So, now I can do ctx.Things.Include(t => t.Stats).OrderByDescending(t => t.Stats.InteractionScore).Take(10).ToList() and that works, but I don't know if that is correct because it feels like such a hack...

2
  • an entity framework compatible way would involve some C# code on C# classes. Post the (simplified) classes to start with. – Henk Holterman May 1 '17 at 17:09
  • @HenkHolterman, I added some more context and some generalized C# code to give you an idea of what I have going so far. Thanks for taking a look. – randcd May 1 '17 at 19:35
3

The idea of an ORM is that Joins are mostly replaced by navigation properties. So your basic C# query would look something like

ctx.Things
   .Include(t => t.Interactions).ThenInclude(i => i.InteractionType) 
   .Select(t => new { 
      t.ThingId, 
      IntScore = t.Interactions.Sum(i => i.InteractionType.Weight /  ...) 
    })
   .OrderBy(x => x.IntScore)
   .Select(x => x.ThingId)
   .Take(10);

On those ... you would need a replacement for DateDiff (there is a 3rd party pkg on NuGet).
And while this is simpler and more readable it's harder to influence the performance of the query this way, you'd have to test. Your SQL solution might not be all bad.

3
  • I'll have to test this to see how it performs. I would prefer to do something like this since all of the elements reside in the code as opposed to my solution that just takes advantage of the weak references in EF. The main issue here is that this drives the first page a person sees when they browse to my site, so it needs to load extremely quickly. Thanks for your reply, I'll look for that NuGet package for the DateDiff functionality. – randcd May 3 '17 at 18:42
  • Do let us hear how that worked out, speed wise. And maybe post a self-answer if you had to tweak it a lot. – Henk Holterman May 9 '17 at 20:23
  • Just wanted to add that the query above can be simplified as ctx.Things.Select(x => x.ThingId).Take(10) since you are not filtering, just projecting. The Includes are useless, too. – SuperJMN Dec 6 '17 at 19:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.