6

If my unit test fails, but the underlying code actually works, would this be called a false positive, or a false negative?

(Here is the context. I run a bunch of tests in parallel and some tests fail. I run them sequentially and they all pass. All the code actually works, there is just an issue with the parallel test runner.)

My question is just with the nomenclature though. I've found examples of people calling it either. After reading Wikipedia, I would've thought it is a false positive, but notably Andrew Ng in his machine learning class said:

If the test passes, even if the code is broken, that is a false positive. If the test fails, when the code is NOT broken, that is a false negative.

  • @Lashane: This website and this website disagrees with you. Care to substantiate your claim? – Dave May 1 '17 at 21:46
  • failed test case == negative, as soon as it is false alarm - it is false negative – Iłya Bursov May 1 '17 at 21:48
  • @Lashane: My null hypothesis is that my code is working. My test (incorrectly) shows that my code is not working (hence, rejecting my null hypothesis). Thus, it is a type I error, a false positive. – Dave May 1 '17 at 21:51
  • @Lashane: "A false positive error, or in short false positive, commonly called a "false alarm", is a result that indicates a given condition has been fulfilled, when it has not." From Wikipedia. – Dave May 1 '17 at 21:54
  • it depends on what you call "alarm" - broken functionality or broken test, for me alarm is broken functionality, so calling "wolf wolf" is broken test -> error type II – Iłya Bursov May 1 '17 at 21:58
9

A unit test is saying the code behaves a certain way. The verbage should reflect that.

  • If the code is broken, but the test passes; that is a false positive.

  • If the code is correct, but the test fails; that is a false negative.

  • If the code is correct and the test passes; that is a true positive.

  • If the code fails and the test fails, that is a true negative.

  • 1
    So, I think the best way to respond to this is as follows: A false positive ("false alarm") is a result that indicates a given condition has been fulfilled, when it has not. A false negative is where a test result indicates that a condition failed, while it was successful. i.e. erroneously no effect has been assumed. If my code is broken and the test passes, no alarm was raised. No effect has been assumed, hence false negative. If the code is correct, but the test fails, an alarm has been raised, hence false positive. So it is exactly the opposite. – Dave May 1 '17 at 21:58
3

I believe it's the other way around than what the other answers are saying.

At least that's how false positives and false negatives are defined in the "XUnit Test Patterns: Refactoring Test Code" book by Gerard Meszaros.

An easy way to understand this is to think of it like in medicine where the tests are "testing for diseases".

If you have the disease you are "disease-positive".

In our software world, you can think it like this:

A POSITIVE test, means you are POSITIVE to a bug i.e. Test fails because you are "NullReferenceExceptionitis-positive"

A NEGATIVE test, means you are NEGATIVE to a bug i.e. Test passes because you are "StackOverflu-negative"

So, keep in mind bug = disease and:

A FALSE positive (to a bug) means your code is falsely accused to have a bug. (Your code has no bugs, yet test fails)

A FALSE negative (to a bug) means your code is falsely declared to have no bugs. (Your code has bugs, yet test passes)

A TRUE positive means your code is rightfully(truly) accused to have bugs. (Your code has bugs, test fails)

A TRUE negative means your code is rightfully(truly) declared to have no bugs (Your code has no bugs, test passes)

I hope this helps.

References: http://xunitpatterns.com/false%20positive.html

And from that book:

If we are having problems with Buggy Tests or Production Bugs, we can reduce the risk of false negatives (tests that pass when they shouldn’t)

also:

false negative

A situation in which a test passes even though the system under test (SUT) is not working properly. Such a test is said to give a false-negative indication or a “false pass.” See also: false positive.

false positive

A situation in which a test fails even though the system under test (SUT) is working properly

0

Agree with what boatcoder has mentioned. To add to it, the word POSITIVE or NEGATIVE refers to what is PREDICTED (test output in this case) and TRUE or FALSE refers to what is PREDICTED with respect to ACTUAL (Code working or not). For example

When code is working and test shows its broken, it is FALSE NEGATIVE. Here NEGATIVE is because the test result shows NEGATIVE , but as code is actually working , the prediction with respect to actual is FALSE. Hence its FALSE NEGATIVE.

When code is not working and test shows its broken, its TRUE NEGATIVE. Here, NEGATIVE is because test shows the code is broken and prediction with respect to actual is TRUE. hence TRUE NEGATIVE.

When code is working and test shows its working, then its TRUE POSITIVE. When code is not working and test shows its working, then its FALSE POSITIVE.

However, all this depends on what you call as POSITIVE. I have considered code working as POSITIVE :) Hope this helps

-1

I agree with @boatcoder, just another wording, maybe easier to understand:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_I_and_type_II_errors#Type_I_error

A type I error occurs when the null hypothesis (H0) is true, but is rejected. It is asserting something that is absent, a false hit.

This is If the code is broken, but the test passes; that is a false positive. from boatcoder's answer

Because test is asserting that code is working, while it is not (working code is absent).

A type II error occurs when the null hypothesis is false, but erroneously fails to be rejected. It is failing to assert what is present, a miss

This is If the code is correct, but the test fails; that is a false negative from boatcoder's answer

Because test is failing to assert that code is working (working code is present).

  • 1
    What is the absent something that is asserted if the test passes? At the least it's quite ambiguous reference you give, but to me a false positive would be to assert the existence of a bug when there is none (that is a incorrectly failing test). – skyking Apr 26 '19 at 7:15
  • @skyking unit test are not for asserting that code is bug-free, they are for asserting that some code-path is working, this is why they are different from diseases, you're not looking for problem, ie positive means that this particular code path is working – Iłya Bursov Apr 26 '19 at 8:02
  • The problem is that the source you've quoted doesn't seem to be very well in line with what you claim, especially the quotes you've selected, even if you interpret the "something" as working code. Take for example the case where a test passes should mean that working code is absent then any passing test would be considered a false positive. Related to this is what we mean that working code is present? I would interpret the precense of working code that there is some code that is working and not necessarily all code is working. – skyking Apr 26 '19 at 23:14
  • @skyking to prove that our code is working, we should reject null-hypothesis (see examples from wiki link), so our H0 is that "code is **not** working". by asserting that some code path is working we're rejecting hypothesis that this code path is not working. so when test passes for broken code we could formulate it "we asserted that (not working code) is absent", while in reality "(not working code) is present" = "(working code) is absent" – Iłya Bursov Apr 27 '19 at 1:28
  • @skyking now about 2nd case, when our H0 is false, ie code is actually working, but we failed to reject H0 (ie we assumed that our H0 is true), we have false negative, ie "we asserted that (working code) is absent", while in reality "(working code) is present" – Iłya Bursov Apr 27 '19 at 1:36

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