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I have two very similar methods. Main difference between them is that they are calling another different method at some point. E.g.:

// method 1
method1(){
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 before calling different method
  methodA();
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 after calling different method
}

// method 2
method2(){
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 before calling different method
  methodB();
 // same code for Method1 and Method2 after calling different method
}

I want to create one method (method) which will be able to call both different methods (methodA and methodB). I guess this should be possible via polymorphism (if I'm wrong correct me please) e.g.:

method(Parent obj){
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 before calling different method
  obj->methodAB();
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 after calling different method
}

class Parent{
public:
  virtual int methodAB();
};

// methodA implementation
Class ChildA: public Parent{
public:
 int methodAB();
}

// methodB implementation
Class ChildB: public Parent{
public:
 int methodAB();
}

actual calling then will be:

Parent *obj = new ChildA; // or Parent *obj = new ChildB;
method1(obj)
delete obj;

But there is one serious problem: In my case methodA() and methodB() takes as argument different types, so my situation is actually:

method1(obj_type1){
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 before calling different method
  methodA(obj_type1);
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 after calling different method
}


method2(obj_type2){
  // same code for Method1 and Method2 before calling different method
  methodB(obj_type2);
 // same code for Method1 and Method2 after calling different method
}

Is it possible to implemented virtual function in derived classes with different types as arguments or is there any another elegant solution for this problem?

  • 1
    You are looking for the words "function pointer" – AndyG May 1 '17 at 21:55
  • 1
    You don't even need run-time polymorphism for this. Templates should work. – PaulMcKenzie May 1 '17 at 21:56
  • @AndyG function pointer can be replaced with polymorphism (which under the hood is using function pointer) cprogramming.com/tutorial/function-pointers.html – Wakan Tanka May 1 '17 at 21:56
  • @PaulMcKenzie I guess yes but I do not know how to correctly implement them. Actually my methodA and methodB are for sorting and here stackoverflow.com/questions/7264402/… is following statement: Templates on the other hand are "horizontal" and define parallel instances of code that knowns nothing of each other. Sorting integers is formally the same as sorting doubles and sorting strings, but those are three entirely different functions. They all "look" the same from afar, but they have nothing to do with each other. – Wakan Tanka May 1 '17 at 21:59
  • Where do object_type1 and object_type2 come from? Are they passed into Method1 and Method2 from the outside? If they're not, then the code isn't exactly the same? – Donnie May 1 '17 at 22:03
2

So refactor the common code to some other functions, and call those from both methods (member functions):

method1(){
  common_code_1();
  auto result = methodA(obj_type1);
  common_code_2(result);
}


method2(){
  common_code_1();
  auto result = methodB(obj_type2);
  common_code_2(result);

}
  • this is not so easy because I'm calling methodA and methodB from inside loop and the next code flow (break, continue or "normal" loop ending) is depended on methodA and methodB result. – Wakan Tanka May 1 '17 at 22:02
  • You can of course pass the result of methodA or methodB to common_code_2. I've added that to my example. – Bo Persson May 2 '17 at 8:27
1

You can use templates to do what you want, something along these lines:

void foo1(int i)
{

}

void foo2(double d)
{

}

template<typename ArgType, void (*Func)(ArgType arg)>
void DoIt(ArgType a)
{
  // Common 1
  Func(a);   
  // Common 2
}

int main()
{
    DoIt<int, foo1>(1);
    DoIt<double, foo2>(1.0);

   return 0;
}

Func doesn't need to be void, it can return a bool or whatever if that's what you need for your processing.

  • 1
    That was my suggestion in the comments, so I'll upvote ; Also, if the argument count in Func is different, passing a functor and calling its operator() is one way to get around the argument count issue. – PaulMcKenzie May 1 '17 at 22:22

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