4

Following LINQ query is supposed to return number of logins per user:

Controller:

var lst = _context.LoginHistory.GroupBy(l => l.UserName).Select(lg => new { user_name = lg.Key, cnt = lg.Count() });

 return View(lst.ToList());

But the SQL Profiler of SQL Server 2012 is returning the following strange query:

SQL Profiler Output:

SELECT [l].[LoginHistory], [l].[Hit_Count], [l].[LastLogin], [l].[UserName]
FROM [LoginHistory] AS [l]
ORDER BY [l].[UserName]

Model:

public class LoginHistory
{
   public int LoginHistoryId { get; set; }
   public string UserName { get; set; }
   public int Hit_Count { get; set; }
   public DateTime LoginDate { get; set; }
}

NOTE:

  1. I don't know why even column Hit_Count is in the profiler output query as it should play no role here - all I'm trying is to display total number of logins per user. Moreover, in SQL Profiler output, I was expecting something similar to the following t-sql:
  2. It's the only LINQ qry the app executes so it's not that I'm mistakenly picking the wrong SQL in the SQL Profiler
  3. The result in the view is also not correct [that actually led me to all the investigation shown in this post]
  4. Could it be another EF Core 1.1.1 bug as the other one pointed out by another user here

Expected [or something similar] SQL Profiler output:

SELECT username, COUNT(*)
FROM LoginHistory
GROUP BY username
  • is the result returned to the view correct or still displaying LoginHistory ? – Searching May 2 '17 at 0:31
  • @Searching The result in view is also not correct. I should point that out in my post, so I will. – nam May 2 '17 at 0:32
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    Are you aware that LINQ does `GroupBy' in app memory, and not as an SQL method? My general preference to SQL methods is to run the TSQL through ADO and avoid the EF + LINQ overhead – Mad Myche May 2 '17 at 1:00
  • @MadMyche No, I was not aware of that. Does that mean SQL Profiler will not catch its generated SQL? I would like act upon your preference of using ADO instead. Do you happen to know how do we pass ADO's result set to a View()? – nam May 2 '17 at 3:55
  • Sql Profiler catches the generated statement, it all gets loaded into the app and then the groups and aggregating is done within. The generated statement is consistent with filling your LoginHistory class. I suppose you could create a new cRud method to (partially) populate the Model based on ADO to a (sql) view or procedure – Mad Myche May 2 '17 at 4:14
-1

Many people are surprised when they are using SQL + LINQ + Entity Framework and when they want to run a simple aggregate function such as yours to find that the Sql Profiler doesn't reflect the aggregation and shows something very similar to a generic SELECT * FROM table.

While most applications using LINQ and EF are also using a database server, others are using or are also using and mapping data from other data sources, such as XML, flat files, Excel spreadsheets into the application's entities/models/classes.

So the normal mode of operation when aggregating data within LINQ is to load and map the resource data, and then perform the desired functions within the application.

This may work fine for some, but in my situation I have limited application server resources and a ton of database resources, so I choose to shift these functions onto my SQL Server and then create a method within the class to use ADO and execute raw SQL.

Applied to your particular model we would have something similar to this, it may vary depending on your particular coding style and any applicable standards.

public class LoginHistory {
    public int LoginHistoryId { get; set; }
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public int Hit_Count { get; set; }
    public DateTime LoginDate { get; set; }

    public List<LoginHistory> GetList_LoginTotals() {
        List<LoginHistory> retValue = new List<LoginHistory>();

        StringBuilder sbQuery = new StringBuilder();
        sbQuery.AppendLine("SELECT username, COUNT(*) ");
        sbQuery.AppendLine("FROM LoginHistory ");
        sbQuery.AppendLine("GROUP BY username");

        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(strConn)) {
            conn.Open();
            using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(sbQuery.ToString(), conn)) {
                cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader()) {
                    while (reader.Read()) {
                        var row = new LoginHistory {
                            UserName = reader.GetString(0)
                            , Hit_Count = reader.GetInt32(1)
                        };
                        retValue.Add(row);
                    }
                }
            }
            conn.Close();
        }
        return retValue;
    }
}

And your controller code could be updated to something similar to this:

var LoginList = new LoginHistory().GetList_LoginTotals(); 
return View(LoginList);

// or the one liner: return View(new LoginHistory().GetList_LoginTotals());
| improve this answer | |
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    Thank you. I followed the similar route from Call a query that returns other types section of this official MSDN article. Your explanation helps even more. – nam May 2 '17 at 15:32
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    As the other answer suggest, its a known limitation in EF Core only. EF6 translate to expected SQL. The answer is correct in the sense that it provides work-around for EF Core and whenever you want to do something different than ORM, ADO.NET is way to go but that does not mean that ORMs are inefficient. That essentially defeats the purpose of using ORM if you want to write ADO.NET code all the time. ORMs (not just EF) do optimize queries when they can instead of loading all data for everything. – Smit May 9 '17 at 19:17
  • Readers: PLEASE NOTE there was a typo in the link I provided in my above comment. Correct link (correctly mentioned in one of my comments below) is official MSDN article. – nam May 11 '17 at 0:16
  • @Smit I agree w/ your comments. One thing I like about ORM is that it simplifies and minimizes the development work. But once in a while there are situation when there are trade offs b/w ORM and ADO.NET code. – nam May 11 '17 at 0:21
  • An ORM may allow you to develop code faster, but does not guaranty code that is faster. – Mad Myche May 11 '17 at 0:52
6

This time it's not really a bug (according to EF Core team), but incomplete feature (because in EF6 it worked the way you expect). You can see it "documented" in the EF Core Roadmap:

The things we think we need before we say EF Core is the recommended version of EF. Until we implement these features EF Core will be a valid option for many applications, especially on platforms such as UWP and .NET Core where EF6.x does not work, but for many applications the lack of these features will make EF6.x a better option.

and then

GroupBy translation will move translation of the LINQ GroupBy operator to the database, rather than in-memory.

The so called client evaluation (a feature of EF Core which doesn't exist in previous EF versions) is the root of all evil. It allows EF Core to "process successfully" many queries in memory, thus introducing performance issues (although by definition they should produce the correct result).

That's why I would suggest always turning on the EF Core Logging to monitor what really happens with your queries. For instance, for the sample query you would see the following warnings:

The LINQ expression 'GroupBy([l].UserName, [l])' could not be translated and will be evaluated locally. To configure this warning use the DbContextOptionsBuilder.ConfigureWarnings API (event id 'RelationalEventId.QueryClientEvaluationWarning'). ConfigureWarnings can be used when overriding the DbContext.OnConfiguring method or using AddDbContext on the application service provider.

The LINQ expression 'GroupBy([l].UserName, [l])' could not be translated and will be evaluated locally. To configure this warning use the DbContextOptionsBuilder.ConfigureWarnings API (event id 'RelationalEventId.QueryClientEvaluationWarning'). ConfigureWarnings can be used when overriding the DbContext.OnConfiguring method or using AddDbContext on the application service provider.

The LINQ expression 'Count()' could not be translated and will be evaluated locally. To configure this warning use the DbContextOptionsBuilder.ConfigureWarnings API (event id 'RelationalEventId.QueryClientEvaluationWarning'). ConfigureWarnings can be used when overriding the DbContext.OnConfiguring method or using AddDbContext on the application service provider.

You can also turn off client evaluation by adding the following inside your DbContext OnConfiguring override:

optionsBuilder.ConfigureWarnings(bulder => bulder.Throw(RelationalEventId.QueryClientEvaluationWarning));

but now you will simple get a runtime exception from that query.

If this is important for you, then you probably fall in the category of applications the lack of these features will make EF6.x a better option.

| improve this answer | |
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    Upvoted. Thank you for clearing the confusion and providing a better explanation. Based on what you and @MadMyche have described I'm now more convinced that in my particular scenario, using ADO was a better choice for me that I adopted using an example from this official MSDN tutorial. – nam May 2 '17 at 15:41
  • The problem is purely in EF Core. It hasn't to be that way - EF6 performs pretty well in most of the cases and has absolutely no problems generating GROUP BY SQL with aggregates, so @MadMyche's statement is not quite correct in general. If the idea is to use plain ADO.NET, why you ever need an ORM like EF then :) Just EF Core was released in very early stage to be a good tool :( Happy coding. – Ivan Stoev May 2 '17 at 16:15

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