85

I am wondering how in javascript if i was given a number (say 10000) and then was given a percentage (say 35.8%)

how would I work out how much that is (eg 3580)

1
  • 2
    You would multiply the number by 35.8%, which is var number=10000; alert(number*0.358); – gnarf Dec 7 '10 at 2:41

10 Answers 10

172
var result = (35.8 / 100) * 10000;

(Thank you jball for this change of order of operations. I didn't consider it).

7
  • 3
    You don't need brackets there. – Klaster_1 Dec 7 '10 at 2:40
  • 63
    @Klaster_1 Yeah, just trying to show the relationship more clearer. You could say I don't need semicolons either, or var, or whitspace, but it wouldn't be very readable or good code would it? :P – alex Dec 7 '10 at 2:41
  • 2
    Switching the order of operations avoids the floating point problem, e.g., var result = pct / 100 * number; – jball Dec 7 '10 at 2:45
  • Why are dividing the 10000? Sure, it gives the correct answer, but it's semantically meaningless. – Ryan Fox Dec 7 '10 at 2:46
  • 1
    @Ryan Fox The 10000 here is the TOTAL amount you want to calculate the percentage (35.8) for. – Cagy79 Jul 10 '15 at 21:53
8

Your percentage divided by 100 (to get the percentage between 0 and 1) times by the number

35.8/100*10000
8

This is what I would do:

// num is your number
// amount is your percentage
function per(num, amount){
  return num*amount/100;
}

...
<html goes here>
...

alert(per(10000, 35.8));
7

Best thing is to memorize balance equation in natural way.

Amount / Whole = Percentage / 100

usually You have one variable missing, in this case it is Amount

Amount / 10000 = 35.8 / 100

then you have high school math (proportion) to multiple outer from both sides and inner from both sides.

Amount * 100 = 358 000

Amount = 3580

It works the same in all languages and on paper. JavaScript is no exception.

6

I use two very useful JS functions: http://blog.bassta.bg/2013/05/rangetopercent-and-percenttorange/

function rangeToPercent(number, min, max){
   return ((number - min) / (max - min));
}

and

function percentToRange(percent, min, max) {
   return((max - min) * percent + min);
}
6

If you want to pass the % as part of your function you should use the following alternative:

<script>
function fpercentStr(quantity, percentString)
{
    var percent = new Number(percentString.replace("%", ""));
    return fpercent(quantity, percent);
}

function fpercent(quantity, percent)
{
    return quantity * percent / 100;
}
document.write("test 1:  " + fpercent(10000, 35.873))
document.write("test 2:  " + fpercentStr(10000, "35.873%"))
</script>
4

In order to fully avoid floating point issues, the amount whose percent is being calculated and the percent itself need to be converted to integers. Here's how I resolved this:

function calculatePercent(amount, percent) {
    const amountDecimals = getNumberOfDecimals(amount);
    const percentDecimals = getNumberOfDecimals(percent);
    const amountAsInteger = Math.round(amount + `e${amountDecimals}`);
    const percentAsInteger = Math.round(percent + `e${percentDecimals}`);
    const precisionCorrection = `e-${amountDecimals + percentDecimals + 2}`;    // add 2 to scale by an additional 100 since the percentage supplied is 100x the actual multiple (e.g. 35.8% is passed as 35.8, but as a proper multiple is 0.358)

    return Number((amountAsInteger * percentAsInteger) + precisionCorrection);
}

function getNumberOfDecimals(number) {
    const decimals = parseFloat(number).toString().split('.')[1];

    if (decimals) {
        return decimals.length;
    }

    return 0;
}

calculatePercent(20.05, 10); // 2.005

As you can see, I:

  1. Count the number of decimals in both the amount and the percent
  2. Convert both amount and percent to integers using exponential notation
  3. Calculate the exponential notation needed to determine the proper end value
  4. Calculate the end value

The usage of exponential notation was inspired by Jack Moore's blog post. I'm sure my syntax could be shorter, but I wanted to be as explicit as possible in my usage of variable names and explaining each step.

2
var number = 10000;
var result = .358 * number;
1

It may be a bit pedantic / redundant with its numeric casting, but here's a safe function to calculate percentage of a given number:

function getPerc(num, percent) {
    return Number(num) - ((Number(percent) / 100) * Number(num));
}

// Usage: getPerc(10000, 25);
0

Harder Way (learning purpose) :

var number = 150
var percent= 10
var result = 0
for (var index = 0; index < number; index++) {
   const calculate = index / number * 100
   if (calculate == percent) result += index
}
return result
0

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