208

I'd like to control how much horizontal space a bullet pushes its <li> to the right in an <ol> or <ul>.

That is, instead of always having

*  Some list text goes
   here.

I'd like to be able to change that to be

*         Some list text goes
          here.

or

*Some list text goes
 here.

I looked around but could only find instructions for shifting the entire block left or right, for example, http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taminglists/

1

22 Answers 22

188

Put its content in a span which is relatively positioned, then you can control the space by the left property of the span.

li span {
  position: relative;
  left: -10px;
}
<ul>
  <li><span>item 1</span></li>
  <li><span>item 2</span></li>
  <li><span>item 3</span></li>
</ul>

7
  • Just to clarify, the <span> tag can be semantic when it is assigned a class, for instance <span class="tel">123-456-7890</span> is implicitly semantic.
    – ingyhere
    Mar 2 '12 at 2:01
  • 6
    +1 for actually answering the guy's question ;) (though the span should ideally in real life have a class anyway for good practice futureproofing as well as semantics: if in future any javascript or new features development etc had a good reason to add extra spans to your content, things could get messy) Aug 7 '12 at 11:01
  • in firefox there is not display properly text is overlapping the bullets using this trick Nov 14 '16 at 6:35
  • @ingyhere I doub't this is true, since I cannot find anything that proves this claim. Can you provide any sources? Nov 8 '19 at 18:31
  • @Wolle Hmmm. It's an old comment, and I'm not sure of the concern -- If it's as to whether <SPAN> can utilize id or class tags, take a look at W3C. If the question is whether it can convey semantic meaning, see this answer. Technically, the <SPAN> tag is a non-semantic inline element by itself, but in some way that affords more flexibility in its re-use. Nowadays, I believe one can use the inline-block descriptor to allow a lot greater range of formatting options.
    – ingyhere
    Nov 9 '19 at 0:44
129

To summarise the other answers here – if you want finer control over the space between bullets and the text in a <li> list item, your options are:

(1) Use a background image:

<style type="text/css">
li {
    list-style-type:none;
    background-image:url(bullet.png);
}
</style>

<ul>
    <li>Some text</li>
</ul>

Advantages:

  • You can use any image you want for the bullet
  • You can use CSS background-position to position the image pretty much anywhere you want in relation to the text, using pixels, ems or %

Disadvantages:

  • Adds an extra (albeit small) image file to your page, increasing the page weight
  • If a user increases the text size on their browser, the bullet will stay at the original size. It'll also likely get further out of position as the text size increases
  • If you're developing a 'responsive' layout using only percentages for widths, it could be difficult to get the bullet exactly where you want it over a range of screen widths

2. Use padding on the <li> tag

<style type="text/css">
ul {padding-left:1em}
li {padding-left:1em}
</style>

<ul>
    <li>Some text</li>
</ul>

Advantages:

  • No image = 1 less file to download
  • By adjusting the padding on the <li>, you can add as much extra horizontal space between the bullet and the text as you like
  • If the user increases the text size, the spacing and bullet size should scale proportionally

Disadvantages:

  • Can't move the bullet any closer to the text than the browser default
  • Limited to shapes and sizes of CSS's built-in bullet types
  • Bullet must be same colour as the text
  • No control over vertical positioning of the bullet

(3) Wrap the text in an extra <span> element

<style type="text/css">
li {
    padding-left:1em;
    color:#f00; /* red bullet */
}
li span {
    display:block;
    margin-left:-0.5em;
    color:#000; /* black text */
}
</style>

<ul>
    <li><span>Some text</span></li>
</ul>

Advantages:

  • No image = 1 less file to download
  • You get more control over the position of the bullet than with option (2) – you can move it closer to the text (although despite my best efforts it seems you can't alter the vertical position by adding padding-top to the <span>. Someone else may have a workaround for this, though...)
  • The bullet can be a different colour to the text
  • If the user increases their text size, the bullet should scale in proportion (providing you set the padding & margin in ems not px)

Disadvantages:

  • Requires an extra unsemantic element (this will probably lose you more friends on SO than it will in real life ;) but it's annoying for those who like their code to be as lean and efficient as possible, and it violates the separation of presentation and content that HTML / CSS is supposed to offer)
  • No control over the size and shape of the bullet

Here's hoping for some new list-style features in CSS4, so we can create smarter bullets without resorting to images or exta mark-up :)

5
  • 5
    Great answer. For #2 to work, be sure you maintain your list-style-position to outside.
    – Tom Auger
    Aug 14 '12 at 15:04
  • The span element is the fix for me. I +1'ed this answer only because I preferred negative margin to negative absolute positioning - for no good reason.
    – FlipMcF
    Feb 27 '13 at 20:51
  • If you have text that wraps lines I found that I had to add display: block; to the span element for so the wrapped text would line up as well ( I also ended up using anchor tags instead of spans )
    – Kevin M
    Jun 5 '13 at 15:33
  • Using background images for anything that is not just that is almost always a very bad idea. They can't be saved, are not printed and not mentioned by screen readers. Using <span> ist most elegant way to solve this. paddings will not work as they also change position of the bullets.
    – Bachsau
    Mar 12 '16 at 8:08
  • 3
    I would NEVER use background image for this. You can always use the :before element with the content: "•"; then, you use padding and absolute position on that before element to control it. Apr 15 '16 at 15:59
45

This should do it. Be sure to set your bullets to the outside. you can also use CSS pseudo elements if you can drop them in IE7 downward. I don't really recommend using pseudo elements for this kinda thing but it does work to control distance.

ul {
  list-style: circle outside;
  width: 100px;
}

li {
  padding-left: 40px;
}

.pseudo,
.pseudo ul {
  list-style: none;
}

.pseudo li {
  position: relative;
}

/* use ISO 10646 for content http://la.remifa.so/unicode/named-entities.html */
.pseudo li:before {
  content: '\2192';
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
}
<ul>
  <li>Any Browser really</li>
  <li>List item
    <ul>
      <li>List item</li>
      <li>List item</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>

<ul class="pseudo">
  <li>IE8+ only</li>
  <li>List item
    <ul>
      <li>List item with two lines of text for the example.</li>
      <li>List item</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>

8
  • 8
    I can't believe this answer isn't accepted. It's 100% CSS, it doesn't add any superfluous <span> element, and it made me finally understand why there is a inside/outside option ! (and it's the accepted answer of the duplicate question mentioned...)
    – MindTailor
    May 13 '13 at 16:52
  • 1
    Using list-style-position: outside and padding on the LI elements allows you to increase the distance between the bullet points but it still doesn't work the other way around beyond a browser specified offset. See this JS Bin.
    – Mesagoma
    Aug 27 '13 at 20:03
  • 4
    Addendum: In modern browsers (IE9+, FF, Chrome, etc.), use a negative text-indent on the <UL> or <LI> to negate the browser enforced distance between bullet point and <LI> content. That is, increase padding-left as shown above to increase the distance and reduce text-indent to reduce the distance between the bullet point and the content as desired.
    – Mesagoma
    Aug 28 '13 at 18:39
  • 1
    Alas, for all of the above mentioned desktop browsers, if the contents of an <LI> wraps into a second line, such subsequent lines end up being re-indented based on the margin/padding/indent that we managed to undo for the first line via text-indent. Sigh
    – Mesagoma
    Aug 28 '13 at 19:35
  • another option is to use the :before pseudo elements and set the content to whatever you like. from there position the pseudo elements as desired.
    – Kevin
    Aug 30 '13 at 1:22
18

Old question, but the :before pseudo element works well here.

<style>
    li:before {
        content: "";
        display: inline-block;
        height: 1rem;  // or px or em or whatever
        width: .5rem;  // or whatever space you want
    }
</style>

It works really well and doesn't require many extra rules or html.

<ul>
    <li>Some content</li>
    <li>Some other content</li>
</ul>

Cheers!

3
  • 4
    Nice & simple answer. I would add that setting margin-left: -5px (or whatever value) will decrease the space between the bullet and the <li> element
    – binaryfunt
    Aug 28 '15 at 11:32
  • 3
    Note: This does not support hanging indents
    – Eric
    Mar 29 '17 at 20:05
  • Awesome answer, this worked perfectly with the most minimal amount of work! Thanks!
    – KyleFarris
    Apr 11 '17 at 15:41
16

For list-style-type: inline:

It's almost the same like DSMann8's answer but less css code.

You just need to

<style>
    li:before {
        content: "";
        padding-left: 10px;
    }
</style>

<ul>
    <li>Some content</li>
</ul>

Cheers

2
  • 1
    This works for list-style-position: inside too, which is great!
    – Matt Dodge
    Dec 12 '18 at 22:31
  • If you want the spacing to be smaller you can use margin-left: -10px property.
    – karoluS
    Nov 3 '20 at 13:32
14

You can use the padding-left attribute on the list items (not on the list itself!).

2
  • 6
    Please note this only works if the list-style-position is set to the default outside.
    – aug
    Mar 18 '15 at 18:48
  • This should be the accepted answer, at least for normal usage. It avoids using a <span> element just for design purpose.
    – eukras
    Oct 7 '19 at 5:28
12

There seems to be a much cleaner solution if you only want to reduce the spacing between the bullet point and the text:

li:before {
    content: "";
    margin-left: -0.5rem;
}
9

Here is another solution using css counter and pseudo elements. I find it more elegant as it doesn't require use of extra html markup nor css classes :

ol,
ul {
    list-style-position: inside;
}

li {
    list-style-type: none;
}

ol {
    counter-reset: ol; //reset the counter for every new ol
}

ul li:before {
        content: '\2022 \00a0 \00a0 \00a0'; //bullet unicode followed by 3 non breakable spaces
}

ol li:before {
        counter-increment: ol;
        content: counter(ol) '.\00a0 \00a0 \00a0'; //css counter followed by a dot and 3 non breakable spaces
}

I use non breakable spaces so that the spacing only affects the first line of my list elements (if the list element is more than one line long). You could use padding here instead.

7

Using text-indent on li works best.

text-indent: -x px; will move the bullet closer to li and vice-versa.

Using relative on span the negative left might not work properly with older versions for IE. P.S- avoid giving positions as much as you can.

1
  • This behaves strange on Chrome. Snaps to little space at -5px; Oct 28 '17 at 18:12
6

Old question but still relevant. I recommend using negative text-indent. list-style-position must be outside.

Pros:

  • Bullet is properly automatically positioned
  • Change font size does not break the bullet position
  • No extra elements ( no ::pseudo-elements too )
  • Works for both RTL and LTR without change in CSS.

Cons:

  • try
  • to
  • find
  • one :)
2
  • 2
    I tried using this method but the indent doesn't work for me if there are line breaks. Text indent will only indent the first line.
    – Matt
    Jan 8 '20 at 22:31
  • Trying this in Chrome just now with list style type outside (I also tried inside) just moves the entire li left or right and doesn't move the text closer or farther from the bullet itself. I tried putting the indent on the ul and on the li and neither had the desired effect.
    – Patrick
    Aug 28 '20 at 14:07
5

It seems you can (somewhat) control the spacing using padding on the <li> tag.

<style type="text/css">
    li { padding-left: 10px; }
</style>

The catch is that it doesn't seem to allow you to scrunch it way-snug like your final example.

For that you could try turning off list-style-type and using &bull;

<ul style="list-style-type: none;">
    <li>&bull;Some list text goes here.</li>
</ul>
5

An unordered list starts with the ul tag. Each list item starts with the The list items will be marked with bullets (small black circles) by default:

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
       <body>
          <h2>Normal List </h2>
          <ul>
             <li>Coffee</li>
             <li>Tea</li>
             <li>Milk</li>
          </ul>
       </body>
    </html>

Output:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<h2>Normal List </h2>

<ul>
  <li>Coffee</li>
  <li>Tea</li>
  <li>Milk</li>
</ul>

</body>
</html>

The text-indent property specifies the indentation of the first line in a text-block.
Note: Negative values are allowed. The first line will be indented to the left if the value is negative.

<ul style='text-indent: -7px;'>
  <li>Coffee</li>
  <li>Tea</li>
  <li>Milk</li>
</ul>
3
  • Thanks for the answer, please try to annotate your solutions though, for ease of others' understanding. Jul 15 '16 at 19:20
  • this is the best answer and should be accepted. minimum CSS!
    – KawaiKx
    Jun 19 '17 at 17:24
  • 1
    Changing the text indent on the UL seemed to just move the entire LI left or right, bullet included. It did not appear to make the text get closer or farther from the bullet itself, using inside or outside on the type. Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but I don't see how this works to answer the question.
    – Patrick
    Aug 28 '20 at 14:03
5

The following solution works well when you want to move the text closer to the bullet and even if you have multiple lines of text.

margin-right allows you to move the text closer to the bullet

text-indent ensures that multiple lines of text still line up correctly

li:before {
  content: "";
  margin-right: -5px; /* Adjust this to move text closer to the bullet */
}

li {
  text-indent: 5px; /* Aligns second line of text */
}
<ul>
  <li> Item 1 ... </li>
  <li> Item 2 ... this item has tons and tons of text that causes a second line! Notice how even the second line is lined up with the first!</li>
  <li> Item 3 ... </li>
</ul>

enter image description here

4

You can also use a background image replacement as an alternative, giving you total control over vertical and horizontal positioning.

See the answer to this Question

2
ul
{
list-style-position:inside;
} 

Definition and Usage

The list-style-position property specifies if the list-item markers should appear inside or outside the content flow.

Source: http://www.w3schools.com/cssref/pr_list-style-position.asp

1
  • 2
    This does not answer the question. It asks the method for controlling the size of the indentation. Oct 15 '13 at 19:41
1

You can just give a padding-left to your <li> element.

1
  • Padding-left can increase the space between bullet and text, but not reduce it (in FireFox anyway)
    – andora
    Sep 2 at 15:24
1

More info w3schools ul { list-style: none; }

ul li::before { content: "\2022"; color: black; display: inline-block; width: 8px;}

0

You can use ul li:before and a background image, and assign position: relative and position:absolute to the li and li:before, respectively. This way you can create an image and position it wherever you want relative to the li.

0

Use padding-left:1em; text-indent:-1em for the <li> tag.
Then, list-style-position: inside for the <ul> tag.

<ul style='list-style-position: inside;'>
  <li style='padding-left: 1em; text-indent: -1em;'>Item 1</li>
</ul>
0

You can use:

ul li { padding-inline-start: 15px; }

0

If your list-style is inside then you could remove the bullet and create your own ... e.g. (in scss!)

            li {
                list-style: none;
                &:before {
                    content: '- ';
                }
            }

And if you list style is outside then you could do something like this:

            li { 
                padding-left: 10px;
                list-style: none;
                &:before {
                    content: '* '; /* use any character you fancy~! */
                    position: absolute;
                    margin-left: -10px;
                }
            }
0

If you'd prefer not to add additional markup e.g. <span>, you could use:

  1. list-style-position: inside; to move the list-style closer to your text from the left
  2. And if you still need to pull the list items closer you can use the ::before selector on the li element to move the text toward the bullet.
    ul {
        list-style-type: disc;
        list-style-position: inside;
        padding-left: 16px; /* or margin */
    }

    li::before {
        content: '';
        margin-left: -8px;
    }
  • List item text
  • List item text
  • List item text
  • List item text

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.