121

This is my sample code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

class MyClass
{
    string figName;
public:
    MyClass(const string& s)
    {
        figName = s;
    }

    const string& getName() const
    {
        return figName;
    }
};

ostream& operator<<(ostream& ausgabe, const MyClass& f)
{
    ausgabe << f.getName();
    return ausgabe;
}

int main()
{
    MyClass f1("Hello");
    cout << f1;
    return 0;
}

If I comment out #include <string> I don't get any compiler error, I guess because it's kind of included through #include <iostream>. If I "right-click --> Go to Definition" in Microsoft VS they both point to the same line in the xstring file:

typedef basic_string<char, char_traits<char>, allocator<char> >
    string;

But when I run my program, I get an exception error:

0x77846B6E (ntdll.dll) in OperatorString.exe: 0xC00000FD: Stack overflow (Parameter: 0x00000001, 0x01202FC4)

Any idea why I get a runtime error when commenting out #include <string>? I'm using VS 2013 Express.

  • 4
    With god's grace. working perfectly on gcc , see ideone.com/YCf4OI – v78 May 2 '17 at 8:50
  • did you try visual studio with visual c++ and comment out include<string>? – airborne May 2 '17 at 8:54
  • 1
    @cbuchart: Although the question was already answered, I think this is a complex enough topic that having a second answer in different words is valuable. I have voted to undelete your great answer. – Lightness Races in Orbit May 2 '17 at 9:41
  • 5
    @Ruslan: Effectively, they are. That is to say, #include<iostream> and <string> might both include <common/stringimpl.h>. – MSalters May 2 '17 at 14:21
  • 3
    In Visual Studio 2015, you get warning ...\main.cpp(23) : warning C4717: 'operator<<': recursive on all control paths, function will cause runtime stack overflow with running this line cl /EHsc main.cpp /Fetest.exe – CroCo May 2 '17 at 19:57
161

Indeed, very interesting behavior.

Any idea why I get I runtime error when commenting out #include <string>

With MS VC++ compiler the error happens because if you do not #include <string> you won't have operator<< defined for std::string.

When the compiler tries to compile ausgabe << f.getName(); it looks for an operator<< defined for std::string. Since it was not defined, the compiler looks for alternatives. There is an operator<< defined for MyClass and the compiler tries to use it, and to use it it has to convert std::string to MyClass and this is exactly what happens because MyClass has a non-explicit constructor! So, the compiler ends up creating a new instance of your MyClass and tries to stream it again to your output stream. This results in an endless recursion:

 start:
     operator<<(MyClass) -> 
         MyClass::MyClass(MyClass::getName()) -> 
             operator<<(MyClass) -> ... goto start;

To avoid the error you need to #include <string> to make sure that there is an operator<< defined for std::string. Also you should make your MyClass constructor explicit to avoid this kind of unexpected conversion. Rule of wisdom: make constructors explicit if they take only one argument to avoid implicit conversion:

class MyClass
{
    string figName;
public:
    explicit MyClass(const string& s) // <<-- avoid implicit conversion
    {
        figName = s;
    }

    const string& getName() const
    {
        return figName;
    }
};

It looks like operator<< for std::string gets defined only when <string> is included (with the MS compiler) and for that reason everything compiles, however you get somewhat unexpected behavior as operator<< is getting called recursively for MyClass instead of calling operator<< for std::string.

Does that mean that through #include <iostream> string is only included partly?

No, string is fully included, otherwise you wouldn't be able to use it.

  • 19
    @airborne - It is not a "Visual C++ specific problem", but what can happen when you don't include the proper header. When using std::string without an #include<string> all kinds of things can happen, not limited to a compile time error. Calling the wrong function or operator is apparently another option. – Bo Persson May 2 '17 at 9:21
  • 15
    Well, this isn't "calling the wrong function or operator"; the compiler is doing exactly what you told it to do. You just didn't know you were telling it to do this ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit May 2 '17 at 9:40
  • 18
    Using a type without including its corresponding header file is a bug. Period. Could the implementation have made the bug easier to spot? Sure. But that's not a "problem" with the implementation, it's a problem with the code you've written. – Cody Gray May 2 '17 at 10:22
  • 4
    Standard libraries are free to include tokens that are defined elsewhere in std within themselves, and are not required to include the entire header if they define one token. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 2 '17 at 17:28
  • 5
    It's somewhat humorous to see a bunch of C++ programmers arguing that the compiler and/or standard library should be doing more work to help them out. The implementation is well within its rights here, according to the standard, as has been pointed out numerous times. Could "trickery" be used to make this more obvious for the programmer? Sure, but we could also write code in Java and avoid this problem altogether. Why should MSVC make its internal helpers visible? Why should a header drag in a bunch of dependencies that it doesn't actually need? That violates the whole spirit of the language! – Cody Gray May 3 '17 at 8:06
35

The problem is that your code is doing an infinite recursion. The streaming operator for std::string (std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const std::string&)) is declared in <string> header file, although std::string itself is declared in other header file (included by both <iostream> and <string>).

When you don't include <string> the compiler tries to find a way to compile ausgabe << f.getName();.

It happens that you have defined both a streaming operator for MyClass and a constructor that admits a std::string, so the compiler uses it (through implicit construction), creating a recursive call.

If you declare explicit your constructor (explicit MyClass(const std::string& s)) then your code won't compile anymore, since there is no way to call the streaming operator with std::string, and you'll be forced to include the <string> header.

EDIT

My test environment is VS 2010, and starting at warning level 1 (/W1) it warns you about the problem:

warning C4717: 'operator<<' : recursive on all control paths, function will cause runtime stack overflow

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