8

So I understand that an ascending order bubble sort checks if index i is greater than index "i + 1", and if it is, then it swaps the positions, and then keeps going till it reaches the end of the loop, and then the loop starts over, and keeps switching positions, until every index "i" is not greater than "i + 1", and then you loop is sorted in ascending order completely.

So I'm looking at this bubble sort code. Here is the source: www.programmingsimplified.com/c/source-code/c-program-bubble-sort

Here is the code:

/* Bubble sort code */

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  int array[100], n, c, d, swap;

  printf("Enter number of elements\n");
  scanf("%d", &n);

  printf("Enter %d integers\n", n);

  for (c = 0; c < n; c++)
    scanf("%d", &array[c]);

  for (c = 0 ; c < ( n - 1 ); c++)
  {
    for (d = 0 ; d < n - c - 1; d++)
    {
      if (array[d] > array[d+1]) /* For decreasing order use < */
      {
        swap       = array[d];
        array[d]   = array[d+1];
        array[d+1] = swap;
      }
    }
  }

  printf("Sorted list in ascending order:\n");

  for ( c = 0 ; c < n ; c++ )
     printf("%d\n", array[c]);

  return 0;
}

I understand all variables except "d". I have no clue what they mean esoterically. So this is the section of code that confuses me:

 for (c = 0 ; c < ( n - 1 ); c++)
      {
        for (d = 0 ; d < n - c - 1; d++)
        {
          if (array[d] > array[d+1]) /* For decreasing order use < */
          {
            swap       = array[d];
            array[d]   = array[d+1];
            array[d+1] = swap;
          }
        }
      }

As I understand it, the first for loop steps through the array of length n - 1 because in C the first index of an array is 0. The length of the second for loop appears to be the length of "c" as it steps through the array, but it's not the length of the array (n - 1), so that confuses me. I don't get what d is, so I don't get why "d" is used in the swap statements instead of "c. I totally get what the swap does though, switching the elements of the array as I explained in the intro with swapping the indices.

So I guess what I don't understand the most is why the second for loop is necessary and the length of the array of d:

 for (d = 0 ; d < n - c - 1; d++)
            {
               // if comparison switch check.
            }

So the code provided in the website does a bubble sort correctly. I tried it with n = 5, and values = {9, 8, 7, 6, 5}

It successfully rearranges them to {5, 6, 7, 8 , 9} in ascending order.

Since I don't understand the second for loop, I thought I would see what would happen if I did not include it, and the result is interesting. I just changed removed the second for loop, and replaced mentions of "d" with c.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{

int array[100], n, c, swap;

printf("Enter number of elements\n");
scanf("%d", &n);

// Tell the user to enter integers in a loop.
printf("Enter %d integers\n", n);
    for (c = 0; c < n; c++)
        scanf("%d", &array[c]);

        for(c = 0; c < (n - 1); c++)
        {

                if(array[c] > array[c + 1])
                {
                    swap = array[c];
                    array[c] = array[c+1];
                    array[c+1] = swap;
                }

        }

        printf("Sorted list in ascending order:\n");

        for(c = 0; c < n; c++)
            printf("%d\n", array[c]);

    return (0);
}

If I see what happens with this code when I removed the second for-loop I get this result. I input 5 elements: {9, 8, 7, 6, 5}, and the order I get back is this: {8, 7, 6, 5, 9}. This is clearly not correct ascending order. But it did a bubble sort through the whole set; it just only completed one pass, so that is why this sorted array starts at 8 because it only made one pass.

Again, this incorrect code now can actually correctly sort this 5 element array: {1, 8, 2, 3, 7}. It changes it to {1, 2, 3, 7, 8}. But it only took one pass through the array to correctly complete this bubble sort.

So I have discovered that the second for loop makes sure the array is numerically sorted in increasing order correctly as many number of passes of bubble sorts are required to make the change.

But I still don't understand it, and it's hard to explain how I don't understand it. I very well know that "c" is the index that slides through the array from beginning to end. But what kind of index is "d" and where does it truly start from, and where does it really end?

Thanks.

If you happen to have simpler code that doesn't require a for-loop inception for a bubble sort, and you can only use one variable, then I would appreciate admiring that code.

5
  • 1
    Perhaps this visualisation will help you understand
    – Spikatrix
    May 3 '17 at 4:57
  • Best thing to do is add printfs to the code to display the values of c and d. And definitely add a printf to your modified code. You may be surprised to see what c is doing in that code. May 3 '17 at 4:59
  • Wow! This visualization is angelic! An animated video is worth a thousand pictures. Thanks so much!
    – xyz123
    May 3 '17 at 5:00
  • That's great advice!
    – xyz123
    May 3 '17 at 5:00
  • You don't need two for loops with indexes. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort#Pseudocode_implementation shows a while loop and a for loop so it would only use one index variable. May 3 '17 at 5:02
9

Here c & d using to traverse and sorting the loop

for c the whole loop is traversing n times

and for d

all elements of the array except the sorted are being traversed and operated for sorting the array

hope that you understand the fact now

Happy Coding

3
  • Thank you! My head aches a lot less now that you explained the true length of "d" to me. Thanks so much!
    – xyz123
    May 3 '17 at 4:57
  • 1
    @xyz123 Though you got your doubt clear, however you can optimize your bubble sort algorithm by using one boolean variable. Refer my blog for more details. This will reduce time complexity of O(n) for best case. At present your algorithm will run in O(n^2) no matter what input you give. May 3 '17 at 5:23
  • 1
    Hmm, you reduced the computational complexity somehow, but your modified function definition still has a similar for --> for --> if structure.
    – xyz123
    May 3 '17 at 5:31
6

What happens is when C is 0 we traverse the whole array (up to N - C - 1) and the maximum digit gets put at the end. Once we have the biggest digit at the end of the array where it belongs, well, we don't need to worry about it anymore. So after that, C increments, and we sort up N - 1 - 1, which will be the farthest value that D will go up to.

Another way to explain. When C is 0, we bring the maximum digit up to last position in the array. When C is 1, we bring up the 2nd biggest digit up to the last - 1 position in the array. And so on and so forth.

D is the one that actually does the traversing, and think of C as a counter.

1
  • Actually makes sense to me!
    – xyz123
    May 3 '17 at 5:03

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