83

Why do I get the following error, and how do I resolve it?

TypeError: super(type, obj): obj must be an instance or subtype of type

12 Answers 12

179

Another way this error can occur is when you reload the module with the class in a Jupiter notebook.

Easy solution is to restart the kernel.

http://thomas-cokelaer.info/blog/2011/09/382/

Check out @Mike W's answer for more detail.

3
  • 14
    Trips me up every time. :)
    – cadolphs
    Aug 29, 2018 at 19:11
  • 12
    I thought I was going nuts too, but this is why I kept on getting this error. Simply quitting and re-entering Python fixed it. Thanks!
    – rayryeng
    Jul 15, 2019 at 6:41
  • 5
    Have to read this once a year, like my Python Christmas. Any way to fix this for good?
    – Eric Burel
    Oct 5, 2021 at 12:07
38

You should call super using the UrlManager class as first argument not the URL model. super cannot called be with an unrelated class/type:

From the docs,

super(type[, object-or-type]): Return a proxy object that delegates method calls to a parent or sibling class of type.

So you cannot do:

>>> class D:
...    pass
... 
>>> class C:
...    def __init__(self):
...        super(D, self).__init__()
... 
>>> C()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in __init__
TypeError: super(type, obj): obj must be an instance or subtype of type

You should do:

qs_main = super(UrlManager, self).all(*args, **kwargs)

Or in Python 3:

qs_main = super().all(*args, **kwargs)
4
  • Is the traceback still the same? The one you've shown shows the error is from the all method of the manager, which I have addressed in my answer. May 3, 2017 at 5:13
  • Haven't much used django lately, but I'm just wondering, is there a reason to use old styled classes here?
    – 0xc0de
    Nov 10, 2017 at 11:11
  • Also I think super doesn't work with the old styled classes, does it?
    – 0xc0de
    Nov 10, 2017 at 11:12
  • 2
    super is not supposed to be called with the parent class as first argument Jul 18, 2018 at 10:31
31

Elaborating in @Oğuz Şerbetci's answer, in python3 (not necessary only in Jupyter), when there is the need to reload a library, for example we have class Parent and class Child defined as

class Parent(object):
    def __init__(self):
        # do something

class Child(Parent):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Child, self).__init__(self)

then if you do this

import library.Child
reload(library)

Child()

you will get TypeError: super(type, obj): obj must be an instance or subtype of type, the solution is just to re import the class after the reload

import library.Child
reload(library)
import library.Child

Child()
2
9

For Jupyter only You can get his issue in because reload logic have some bugs (issue)

Here is a simple solution/workaround that works for me until issue is not fixed

  1. Add typo like 1001xx at the bottom of the file which you call in the cell
  2. Run your cell - you will see some exception, just skip it
  3. Remove typo which was added on step 1
  4. Run the cell
  5. Profit
7

Another interesting way is if a merge of branches has duplicated the class, so that in the file you have two definitions for the same name, e.g.

class A(Foo):
    def __init__(self):
        super(A, self).__init__()
        #...

class A(Foo):
    def __init__(self):
        super(A, self).__init__()
        #...

If you try to create an instance from a static reference to the first definition of A, once it tries to call super, inside the __init__ method, A will refer to the second definition of A, since it has been overwritten. The solution - ofcourse - is to remove the duplicate definition of the class, so it doesn't get overwritten.

This may seem like something that would never happen, but it just happened to me, when I wasn't paying close enough attention to the merge of two branches. My tests failed with the error message described in the question, so I thought I'd leave my findings here, even though it doesn't exactly answer the specific question.

0
7

The best solution that I have found for this problem is only available using python 3. You then don't need to specify the arguments of "super", then you won't have the error any more writing your class like this :

class D:
   pass

class C(D):
    def __init__(self):
        super().__init__()# no arguments given to super()
1
  • 1
    Nailed it for me, I didn't do init on the super() when I did init on my class. Sep 27, 2022 at 4:54
3

This error also pops out when you simply do not instantiate child class , and try to call a method on a class itself, like in :

class Parent:
    def method():
        pass

class Child(Parent):
    def method():
        super().method()

P = Parent()
C = Child
C.method()
2
  • 1
    Thanks. This is particular tricky if you are using a class which does not have any member variables. For instance, everything is at-staticmethod or at-classmethod decrator. Then you might be inclined to just call MyInstance.mymethod instead of MyInstance().mymethod (note the brackets)
    – toobee
    Jun 21, 2022 at 13:01
  • This case (staticmethod) is also covered in stackoverflow.com/q/58398508/5267751 .
    – user202729
    Mar 22 at 1:42
2

Simply restart the kernel if it cannot fetch the values. It worked with this code:

import datetime as dt
start = dt.datetime(2018,1,2)
end = dt.datetime(2022,12,29)

import pandas_datareader.data as pdr

stk_tickers = ['AAPL','MSFT','AMZN','TSLA','GOOG']

ccy_tickers = ['DEXJPUS','DEXUSUK']
idx_tickers = ['SP500','DJIA','VIXCLS']

yfin.pdr_override()
stk_data = pdr.get_data_yahoo(stk_tickers,start,end)
ccy_data = pdr.get_data_fred(ccy_tickers,start,end)
idx_data = pdr.get_data_fred(idx_tickers,start,end)
1

Similar to @Eldamir, I solved it by realizing I had written two classes with the same name, and the second one was overwriting the first.

If that's the case, change the name of one of the classes.

1

So I just pasted in a form in forms.py.

I just made a fast look to see if I needed to change anything, but I didn't see that.

Then I got this super(type, obj): obj must be an instance or subtype of type error, so I searched for it on the browser, but before I checked any of the answers I looked one more time and this time I spotted the issue.

As you can see, many answers on this question says it was wrong with the super. Yes it was the same issue for me.

make sure that you look if you have any super and see if the class added matches with the class. At least that's what I did.


Before and After

Where I spotted it in my code

forms.py

Before:

class userProfileForm(ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = user_profile
        fields = ("user", "rating", )
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # https://stackoverflow.com/a/6866387/15188026
        hide_condition = kwargs.pop('hide_condition',None)
        super(ProfileForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        if hide_condition:
            self.fields['user'].widget = HiddenInput()

After:

class userProfileForm(ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = user_profile
        fields = ("user", "rating", )
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # https://stackoverflow.com/a/6866387/15188026
        hide_condition = kwargs.pop('hide_condition',None)
        super(userProfileForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        if hide_condition:
            self.fields['user'].widget = HiddenInput()

You see that the super got changed to the class name

1

TypeError: super(type, obj): obj must be an instance or subtype of type is also raised (erratically) when calling super() in a decorated method of a slotted dataclass:

from dataclasses import dataclass


def decorated(method):
    def wrapped(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return method(self, *args, **kwargs)

    return wrapped


@dataclass(slots=True)
class A:
    def f(self):
        pass


@dataclass(slots=True)
class B(A):
    @decorated
    def f(self):
        super().f()


B().f()

The same happens when using attrs instead of dataclasses, see https://github.com/python-attrs/attrs/issues/1038.

The issue is due to cell rewriting for slotted classes in attrs and dataclasses.

The workaround is to either use super(B, self) or not use slots.

1
0
class A_net(nn.Module):
    def __init__(self):
        super(A_net, self).__init__()
        # define layers and architecture

    def forward(self, x):
        # define forward pass

The class name should match the written class inside the super function. In this case, A_net is the class. It works for me.

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