77

How can I log all SQL queries that my django application performed?

I want to log everything, including SQLs from admin site. I saw this question and a FAQ answer but I still can't figure out where should I put

from django.db import connection
connection.queries

to log everything to one file?

So my question is - what should I do to have a file (say all-sql.log) where all SQL statements are logged?

17

Maybe check out https://github.com/django-debug-toolbar/django-debug-toolbar

It'll let you see all the queries generated by a given page. As well as stacktraces of where they occur etc.

EDIT: to log all SQL queries to a file etc, then you will want to create some middleware. Middleware gets run on every request. There are several Django snippets out there for this sort of thing:

Those are concerned with printing to the terminal, but it wouldn't be hard to adapt them to use python's logging library.

  • Thanks. I know about the debug toolbar. But I want to log everything (all pages) in one file – Oleg Pavliv Dec 7 '10 at 12:01
143

Merge the following snippet with the LOGGING field in your settings.py:

LOGGING = {
    'version': 1,
    'filters': {
        'require_debug_true': {
            '()': 'django.utils.log.RequireDebugTrue',
        }
    },
    'handlers': {
        'console': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
            'filters': ['require_debug_true'],
            'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
        }
    },
    'loggers': {
        'django.db.backends': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
            'handlers': ['console'],
        }
    }
}

Tweaked from @acardenas89 answer

  • 2
    you may need to add the following to the handlers section in case you get Unable to add handler 'console': 'console' error: 'console':{ 'level':'DEBUG', 'class':'logging.StreamHandler', 'formatter': 'verbose', 'stream': sys.stderr, }, – Don Grem Jan 20 '14 at 8:40
  • 8
    Please note that DEBUG must be TRUE for logs to actually be logged. Regardless of logging settings. – Janusz Skonieczny Jun 9 '17 at 17:50
  • 3
    This is silly and funny in a way, when I search for this problem an find my own answer. How can't I remember this just few months later? – Janusz Skonieczny Oct 19 '17 at 15:01
  • 3
    Oh, and one more thing to in django test runner ignores settings and overrides DEBUG to False, so in test you must @override_settings(DEBUG=True) – Janusz Skonieczny Oct 19 '17 at 15:14
  • 5
    I would also add 'propagate': False after the 'handlers': ['console'], line, in case you have a root logger enabled and don't know why this prints twice. Took me a bit to realize. – Andrei-Niculae Petre Oct 20 '17 at 8:12
39

Add the following bold statements in settings.py


if DEBUG:
    import logging
    l = logging.getLogger('django.db.backends')
    l.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
    l.addHandler(logging.StreamHandler())


LOGGING = {
    'version': 1,
    'disable_existing_loggers': False,
    'filters': {
        'require_debug_false': {
            '()': 'django.utils.log.RequireDebugFalse'
        }
    },
    'handlers': {
        'mail_admins': {
            'level': 'ERROR',
            'filters': ['require_debug_false'],
            'class': 'django.utils.log.AdminEmailHandler'
        },'console': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
            'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
        },
    },
    'loggers': {
        'django.request': {
            'handlers': ['mail_admins'],
            'level': 'ERROR',
            'propagate': True,
        },'django.db.backends.sqlite3': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
            'handlers': ['console'],
        },
    }
}
  

Resource/Credit

  • 9
    You don't need both the if statement at the top and the LOGGING changes. The if statement is for if you want to add logging whilst e.g. in the shell, to turn it on immediately - all you need in settings.py is the LOGGING changes - and you might well want django.db.backends, not the sqlite3 specific one. – M Somerville May 29 '13 at 10:30
  • I don't see any queries on the console running django 1.9. DEBUG = True. – Ciro Santilli 新疆改造中心法轮功六四事件 May 19 '16 at 12:44
  • 1
    @CiroSantilli巴拿馬文件六四事件法轮功 This is a really old comment, very possibly Django 1.9 does not support this solution the same. – cevaris May 19 '16 at 17:32
  • In Django 1.9, the DEBUG setting is forced to be False when running tests. A workaround is to re-enable it in the test – Mouscellaneous Feb 1 '17 at 16:15
11

Django 1.3 logs all SQL statements to django.db.backends logger:

https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/logging/#django-db-backends

4

To log SQL queries during testing, you need two things:

  1. django.db.backends logger enabled and
  2. @override_settings(DEBUG=True) decorator.

Test runner will set DEBUG=False by default, ignoring what you may have set in DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE.

The minimum settings:

# https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/settings/#logging
LOGGING = {
    'version': 1,
    'handlers': {
        'console': {
            'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
        },
    },
    'loggers': {
        'django.db.backends': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
        },
    },
    'root': {
        'handlers': ['console'],
    }
}

The example test case:

from django.contrib.auth.models import User
from django.test import TestCase, override_settings


class UserTests(TestCase):

    # To log queries in tests you need to manually override DEBUG setting
    # because testing sets DEBUG=False by default

    @override_settings(DEBUG=True)
    def test_create_user(self):
        User.objects.create()
0

You need to put this in a middleware package. The middleware sits between the webserver/django core and all your views. It can do preprocessing before the request, and postprocessing after the request completed. For example, save the queries to a file.

0

You only need:

@override_settings(DEBUG=True)

if you already have SQL debug statements being printed in runserver.

Add the decorator to your class TestA(TestCase) or test_function:

@override_settings(DEBUG=True)
class TestA(TestCase):
...

    @override_settings(DEBUG=True)
    def test_function(self):
    ...

Credits to @Janusz Skonieczny's answer!

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