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I have a table designed as below in Oracle

+-----------+------+-------+
|    ID     | TYPE | VALUE | 
+-----------+------+-------+
| 1         | A    |     1 |
| 1         | B    |     2 |
| 1         | C    |     3 |
| 2         | A    |     4 |
| 2         | B    |     5 |
| 2         | C    |     6 |
+-----------+------+-------+

I need to transpose this table like this

    +-----------+------+-------+-----+
    |    ID     | A    |     B |   C | 
    +-----------+------+-------+-----+
    | 1         | 1    |     2 |   3 |
    | 2         | 4    |     5 |   6 |
    +-----------+------+-------+-----+

Below is the sql I wrote using oracle pivot function to transpose these rows into columns.

select * from
(
select ID, TYPE, VALUE from table where TYPE in ('A','B','C')
)
PIVOT (
max(value)
for TYPE in (1 column_a, 2 column_b, 3 column_c)
)

So these are my questions

  1. This returns the result but returns null value even if it's not null. Is it returning NULL because I am using an aggregate function with string value?
  2. This SQL does not map value to the type. so basically value always need to be tied to type column. Is this doable with PIVOT function?

I am also thinking about just recreating table by using INSERT with SELECT. Please advise if this is doable using PIVOT.

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  • Instead of 1,2,3 you need 'A','B','C' – xQbert May 3 '17 at 15:51
2

I find it much easier just to use conditional aggregation:

select id,
       max(case when type = 'A' then value end) as a,
       max(case when type = 'B' then value end) as b,
       max(case when type = 'C' then value end) as c
from t
group by id;

You can insert the results into a table using create table as. That should work with a pivot query as well.

5
  • I do too; and it's more generic supported across multiple DB platforms. – xQbert May 3 '17 at 15:57
  • 1
    @xQbert - while all that is true, if one actually works in Oracle and efficiency matters, then PIVOT should be preferred; it is much less CPU-intensive than the "old" or "manual" way of pivoting. See for example guyharrison.squarespace.com/blog/2009/7/27/… – mathguy May 3 '17 at 16:03
  • Good link and info. – xQbert May 3 '17 at 16:08
  • @mathguy . . . Interesting. It is exactly the opposite on SQL Server. – Gordon Linoff May 4 '17 at 2:27
  • Thanks for the comments all. I tried Pivot but since data set was small, I just used this way. – user2747356 May 11 '17 at 14:05
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1,2,3 for the pivot should be 'A','B','C'

with CTE (ID,Type,Value) as (
SELECT 1, 'A',1 from dual union all
SELECT 1, 'B',2 from dual union all
SELECT 1, 'C',3 from dual union all
SELECT 2, 'A',4 from dual union all
SELECT 2, 'B',5 from dual union all
SELECT 2, 'C',6 from dual)

SELECT * 
FROM (SELECT ID, TYPE, VALUE FROM cte WHERE TYPE in ('A','B','C'))  
PIVOT (sum(value)
       for TYPE in ('A' "A",'B' "B",'C' "C"))  --Type has values of A,B,C so you have 
                                               --to pivot on A,B,C.. 1,2,3 are the values.

Is it returning NULL because I am using an aggregate function with string value? No, because you're pivoting on the wrong thing. pivot on types not type values

This SQL does not map value to the type. *Just because you were pivoting on the wrong thing in my opinion...

So basically value always need to be tied to type column. Is this doable with PIVOT function? Yes, you were just off by 3 characters in my opinion

IMG of working Example:

enter image description here

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