10

I have a string list

new List<string> { "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six" }

And I want to have a string with exact this content (including double quotes)

"One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six"

Because will write a text file that will be a array[] = { my_string }

I tried this with no success

var joinedNames = fields.Aggregate((a, b) => "\"" + a + ", " + b + "\"");

Little LINQ help will be greatly appreciate :)

21
var joinedNames = "\"" + string.Join("\", \"", fields) + "\"";
  • cannot convert string to string[] :) – orfruit May 3 '17 at 17:01
  • Typed it from memory, had the arguments backwards. It's right now. – Joel Coehoorn May 3 '17 at 17:06
  • var joinedNames = "\"" + string.Join("\", \"", fields.ToArray()) + "\""; Thank you all of you! – orfruit May 3 '17 at 17:31
  • That worked well for me. To print it in a Razor View, use @Html.Rar(Model.JoinedNames); // works like a charm! – JayJay May 3 '18 at 18:55
  • Worked, but the escape char (the backslash) presents in the joined string. Is there a way to achieve this without getting the backslash into the joined string? – J K Dec 7 '18 at 9:21
11

You can do that easily with Linq and string.Join

var joinedNames = string.Join(", ", fields.Select(f => "\"" + f + "\""));
3

Use string.Join:

var myList = new List<string> { "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six" };
var joined = string.Join(", ", myList.Select(item => "\"" + item + "\""));
3
var list = new List<string> { "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six" };
joinedNames = "\"" + string.Join("\", \"", list) + "\"";
0

List<string> is just an implementation of an IEnumerable interface, which int itself is a wrapper of and inherits the methods of string[], which has a string.join(...) method within it which is what you actually want to do.

I ran a test using your original data, however I added null within to the set. All 4 versions of the data (list, array, and an IEnumerable from each) performed the join method as expected and ended up with the exact same string.

    List<string> list = new List<string> { "One", "Two", "Three", null, "Four", "Five", "Six" };
    string JoinedList = "\"" + string.Join("\", \"", list) + "\"";

    string[] array = new string[] { "One", "Two", "Three", null, "Four", "Five", "Six" };
    string JoinedArray = "\"" + string.Join("\", \"", array) + "\"";

    IEnumerable<string> ieList = new List<string> { "One", "Two", "Three", null, "Four", "Five", "Six" };
    string ieListString = "\"" + string.Join("\", \"", ieList) + "\"";


    IEnumerable<string> ieArray = new string[] { "One", "Two", "Three", null, "Four", "Five", "Six" };
    string ieArrayString = "\"" + string.Join("\", \"", ieArray) + "\"";

    Console.WriteLine("Joined List    : " + JoinedList);
    Console.WriteLine("Joined Array    : " + JoinedArray);
    Console.WriteLine("Joined ieList    : " + ieListString);
    Console.WriteLine("Joined ieArray    : " + ieArrayString);

    // results in
    //    Joined List     : "One", "Two", "Three", "", "Four", "Five", "Six"
    //    Joined Array    : "One", "Two", "Three", "", "Four", "Five", "Six"
    //    Joined ieList   : "One", "Two", "Three", "", "Four", "Five", "Six"
    //    Joined ieArray  : "One", "Two", "Three", "", "Four", "Five", "Six"

In the context that you presented, there is neither an advantage nor disadvantage to any of the data objects. If we are looking for performance (however minuscule) were would want to keep it a string[], but if we need maximum functionality we would need to use List. The IEnumerable does have some added methods (eg Order) but does not have Remove functions (to catch that null value I inserted)

  • List does not inherit the methods of array and string.Join is a static method in string, not string[]. Your entire first paragraph is nonsense. – juharr May 4 '17 at 13:12
  • @juharr So it could use some rewording, do you have a recommendation? – Mad Myche May 4 '17 at 13:25
  • While this answer does show how to quote and join multiple strings together using string.Join, its main focus seems to be comparing various data structures for storing those strings. The author simply stated "I have a string list", and from the brief code snippet that follows we can't tell if it'd be appropriate to suggest another type. None of this is "bad" information (though I agree with @juharr that the first paragraph needs some corrections), it just goes beyond the scope of the question and overshadows the answer to what was actually asked. – BACON May 10 '17 at 20:05

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