2

Here's the table:

enter image description here

Should not they have the same result mathematically? (the average score of the per column and per row average)

  • Could some rounding be taking place here? – Tim Biegeleisen May 4 '17 at 4:49
  • @TimBiegeleisen, None. No round-offs done. – Ronald May 4 '17 at 5:05
5

The missing cells mean that your cells aren't all weighted evenly.

For example, row 11 has only two cells 82.67 and 90. So for your row average for row 11 they are weighted much more heavily than in your column averages where they are 1/13 and 1/14 of a column instead of 1/2 of a row.

Try filling up all the empty cells with 0 and the averages should match.

Taking a more extreme version of Ruslan Karaev's example:

5 5 5 | 5
1     | 1  Average of Average of Rows = (5 + 1 + 0) / 3 = 2
0     | 0
-----
2 5 5
Average of Average of Columns = (2 + 5 + 5) / 3 = 4
  • I was using AVERAGEIF thus ignoring the zeros and empty cells. – Ronald May 4 '17 at 5:03
  • 2
    82.67 is contributing to 1/2 of a row average, that's 1/32 of the overall average. That's much more than a cell in a full row which only contributed 1/11 * 1/16 = 1/176 of the overall average. – c.. May 4 '17 at 5:08
  • 1
    I agree with this answer. Even though each row or column average ignores empty cells, you are still weighing all rows and columns evenly. This is flawed logic, resulting in your current output. – Tim Biegeleisen May 4 '17 at 5:09
  • I won't remove my answer since rounding may still be an issue. But I think it's clear from your example that this is the most likely answer. Good job (and a vote of course). – paxdiablo May 4 '17 at 5:15
1

Yes, for example, the following two expressions:

 / a + b   X + Y \     / a + X   b + Y \
(  ----- + -----  )   (  ----- + -----  )
 \   2       2   /     \   2       2   /
-------------------   -------------------
         2                     2

are indeed mathematically equivalent, both coming out to be (a + b + X + Y) / 4.

However, short of having enough sufficient precision to store values, you may find that rounding errors accumulate differently depending on the order of operations.

You can see this sort of effect in a much simpler example if you assume a 3-digit precision and divide one by three, then multiply the result of that by three again:

1 / 3 -> 0.333, 0.333 x 3 -> 0.999

Contrast that with doing the operations in the oppisite order:

1 x 3 = 3, 3 / 1 = 1
  • Your answer makes sense. But I didn't round off the figures. – Ronald May 4 '17 at 5:04
  • @Ronald, you may not have rounded off the figures, but it's possible Excel did :-) – paxdiablo May 4 '17 at 5:08
  • 1
    I don't think rounding is the issue here. – Tim Biegeleisen May 4 '17 at 5:10
  • @paxdiablo, thanks for the answer. But I really did not do any rounding-off. It seems that user c's edited answer makes sense. – Ronald May 4 '17 at 5:41

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