63

I have been getting into the basics of functional programming with C++. I am trying to make a function f(a)(b)(c) that will return a + b + c. I successfully implemented the function f(a)(b) which returns a + b. Here is the code for it:

std::function<double(double)> plus2(double a){
    return[a](double b){return a + b; };
}

I just cannot figure out how to implement the function f(a)(b)(c) which as I previously stated should return a + b + c.

  • 38
    May I ask why exactly you're trying to do functional programming in c++ (as opposed to any inherently functional language)? – Ben Steffan May 4 '17 at 12:58
  • 12
    Not sure if you can do it with just f(a)(b)(c). You should be able to get it working fairly easily if you want to use f(a)(b)(c)(). – NathanOliver May 4 '17 at 12:58
  • 6
    @BenSteffan C++ offered function objects before some of the mainstream functional languages came about. Iterators and algorithms are just one feature that was transferred from C++ to functional languages. It already supports lambdas. It already allows passing functions as arguments to iterators. etc etc etc – Panagiotis Kanavos May 4 '17 at 13:06
  • 7
    @am.rez that's the lambda-expression's capture list. – Quentin May 4 '17 at 13:18
  • 9
    Note that you can use auto for the return type of your function, and avoid the type erasure cost of std::function. – Quentin May 4 '17 at 13:23
58

Just take your 2 elements solution and expand it, by wrapping it with another lambda.

Since you want to return a lambda that get a double and returns a doubles' addition lambda, all you need to do is to wrap your current return type with another function, and add a nested lambda into your current one (a lambda that returns a lambda):

std::function<std::function<double(double)>(double)> plus3 (double a){
    return [a] (double b) {
        return [a, b] (double c) {
            return a + b + c;
        };
    };
}

  • As @Ðаn noted, you can skip the std::function<std::function<double(double)>(double)> and get along with auto:

    auto plus3 (double a){
        return [a] (double b) {
            return [a, b] (double c) { return a + b + c; };
        };
    }
    
  • You can expand this structure for every number of elements, using deeper nested lambdas. Demonstration for 4 elements:

    auto plus4 (double a){
        return [a] (double b) {
            return [a, b] (double c) {
                return [a, b, c] (double d) {
                    return a + b + c + d;
                };
            };
        };
    }
    
  • 11
    Nice, gets what the OP wants, but it doesn't expand well. – NathanOliver May 4 '17 at 13:23
  • 4
    That is exactly how I was trying to implement it but I did not include std::function<double(double)>(double). Thank you, it made a lot of things clearer and now I now how to nest it even deeper(even though I don't want to go further than that). – Gigaxel May 4 '17 at 13:24
  • 3
    Nice, is it possible to generalize to, e.g., fewer and more elements? – Jonas May 4 '17 at 13:28
  • 3
    @Uriel I'm aware of the possibility of nesting more lambdas. How would you go about implementing it without defining a new function like plus2 and plus4? – Jonas May 4 '17 at 13:33
  • 8
    @Jonas: The usual solution to that would be non-type template parameters, specifically defining plus<N> in terms of plus<N-1>. The downside is obvious; you'd still need to specify the exact number of arguments up front. – MSalters May 4 '17 at 15:05
113

You can do it by having your function f return a functor, i.e., an object that implements operator(). Here is one way to do it:

struct sum 
{
    double val;

    sum(double a) : val(a) {}

    sum operator()(double a) { return val + a; }

    operator double() const { return val; }
};

sum f(double a)
{
    return a;
}

Example

Link

int main()
{
    std::cout << f(1)(2)(3)(4) << std::endl;
}

Template version

You can even write a templated version that will let the compiler deduce the type. Try it here.

template <class T>
struct sum 
{
    T val;

    sum(T a) : val(a) {}

    template <class T2>
    auto operator()(T2 a) -> sum<decltype(val + a)> { return val + a; }

    operator T() const { return val; }
};

template <class T>
sum<T> f(T a)
{
    return a;
}

Example

In this example, T will ultimately resolve to double:

std::cout << f(1)(2.5)(3.1f)(4) << std::endl;
  • 46
    @PanagiotisKanavos what are you on about... Standard algorithms expect functions or function objects. A lambda-expression is syntactic sugar for a function object. There won't be any problem because it is exactly the same thing, and is even defined as such in the standard. Also, std::function is tangent to the discussion -- that's for type erasure. – Quentin May 4 '17 at 13:11
  • 16
    @PanagiotisKanavos: The problem with lambda's is that they're anonymous. But as you see here, sum::operator() returns sum. Lacking a name, that kind of self-reference is impossible for lambda's. – MSalters May 4 '17 at 13:18
  • 26
    @PanagiotisKanavos: First and foremost, you should realize that in C++, a lambda expression is just an alternative syntax to define a class that overloads operator(). There's not a thing in the world wrong with using the "normal" syntax to create such a class (especially for cases where the lambda expression syntax doesn't work so well). – Jerry Coffin May 4 '17 at 14:11
  • 14
    @PanagiotisKanavos: Note that different languages have different definitions of exactly what constitutes a function. C++ already inherited a definition of function from C, so it needed a new term for the broader concept. A nominal difference doesn't mean callable objects in C++ are structurally different from functions in functional languages. If it walks like a duck and talks like a duck, it is a duck. – MSalters May 4 '17 at 15:10
  • 15
    @PanagiotisKanavos: By that argument, you've excluded lambdas, which are also classes that act like functions, and not actual functions. – Mooing Duck May 4 '17 at 16:43
30

Here is a slightly different approach, which returns a reference to *this from operator(), so you don't have any copies floating around. It is a very simple implementation of a functor which stores state and left-folds recursively on itself:

#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
class Sum
{
    T x_{};
public:
    Sum& operator()(T x)
    {
        x_ += x;
        return *this;
    }
    operator T() const
    {
        return x_;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Sum<int> s;
    std::cout << s(1)(2)(3);
}

Live on Coliru

  • 4
    this works for any number of (summand) and is recursive, i.e. does not require to define yet another function/lambda for each level. – Walter May 4 '17 at 16:27
  • Pardon my ignorance, but how does the compiler know to call your cast operator? I see that it couldn't really do anything else, since there's no insertion operator defined, but I didn't realise that something like this would work without being explicit with the cast. – Dave Branton May 7 '17 at 21:14
  • 1
    @DaveBranton The rules of the language say that the compiler is allowed to try at most one user-defined conversion. In our case, we have such a conversion operator, so in cout << s(1)(2)(3) the compiler first sees that it cannot simply display it, then it searches for user-defined conversion operators, and finds Sum::operator T() const. It then applies the conversion to T then displays the T if it can (in our case it can because it is an int). – vsoftco May 7 '17 at 21:36
  • This is how function chaining is implemented. – Nikos Sep 27 '18 at 16:07
15

This isn't f(a)(b)(c) but rather curry(f)(a)(b)(c). We wrap f such that each additional argument either returns another curry or actually invokes the function eagerly. This is C++17, but can be implemented in C++11 with a bunch of extra work.

Note that this is a solution for currying a function - which is the impression that I got from the question - and not a solution for folding over a binary function.

template <class F>
auto curry(F f) {
    return [f](auto... args) -> decltype(auto) {
        if constexpr(std::is_invocable<F&, decltype(args)...>{}) {
            return std::invoke(f, args...);
        }
        else {
            return curry([=](auto... new_args)
                    -> decltype(std::invoke(f, args..., new_args...))
                {
                    return std::invoke(f, args..., new_args...);
                });
        }
    };  
}

I've skipped forwarding references for brevity. Example usage would be:

int add(int a, int b, int c) { return a+b+c; }

curry(add)(1,2,2);       // 5
curry(add)(1)(2)(2);     // also 5
curry(add)(1, 2)(2);     // still the 5th
curry(add)()()(1,2,2);   // FIVE

auto f = curry(add)(1,2);
f(2);                    // i plead the 5th
  • 4
    C++17 makes that so tidy. Writing my function curry in C++14 was much more painful. Note that for full efficiency, you may need a function object that conditionally moves its tuple of state depending on invocation context. That may require decoupling tup and maybe f from the lambda capture list so it can be passed in with different rvalueness depending on how () is called. Such a solution goes beyond the scope of this question, however. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 5 '17 at 14:13
  • @Yakk Hoping to make it even tidier! Need to find time to revise that paper... – Barry May 5 '17 at 14:37
  • I don't see anything in there that permits perfect forwarding of the "this" of the lambda itself, so if invoked in a maybe-rvalue context you can forward by-value captured things perfectly. That may have to be a different proposal. (Aside: how would you distinguish between the lambda's *this context and the enclosing method's *this context? Hurm.) – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 5 '17 at 14:41
  • @Yakk Nope, I'm just trying to make simple lambdas shorter. There was something floating around std-proposals of doing something like auto fact = [] self (int i) { return (i < = 1) ? 1 : i * self(i-1); }; but I can't find a paper. – Barry May 5 '17 at 14:43
12

The simplest way I can think of to do this is to define plus3() in terms of plus2().

std::function<double(double)> plus2(double a){
    return[a](double b){return a + b; };
}

auto plus3(double a) {
    return [a](double b){ return plus2(a + b); };
}

This combines the first two argument lists into a single arglist, which is used to call plus2(). Doing so allows us to reuse our pre-existing code with minimal repetition, and can easily be extended in the future; plusN() just needs to return a lambda that calls plusN-1(), which will pass the call down to the previous function in turn, until it reaches plus2(). It can be used like so:

int main() {
    std::cout << plus2(1)(2)    << ' '
              << plus3(1)(2)(3) << '\n';
}
// Output: 3 6

Considering that we're just calling down in line, we can easily turn this into a function template, which eliminates the need to create versions for additional arguments.

template<int N>
auto plus(double a);

template<int N>
auto plus(double a) {
    return [a](double b){ return plus<N - 1>(a + b); };
}

template<>
auto plus<1>(double a) {
    return a;
}

int main() {
    std::cout << plus<2>(1)(2)          << ' '
              << plus<3>(1)(2)(3)       << ' '
              << plus<4>(1)(2)(3)(4)    << ' '
              << plus<5>(1)(2)(3)(4)(5) << '\n';
}
// Output: 3 6 10 15

See both in action here.

  • 2
    This is great! It scales neatly, and the implementation is nice and simple. – Jonas May 4 '17 at 16:43
  • @Jonas Thanks. When you're trying to expand an existing framework like this, the simplest way is probably to find a way to define the expanded version in terms of the current version, unless that would be too convoluted. I also don't believe the prototype is strictly necessary for the templated version, but it can increase clarity in some cases. – Justin Time - Reinstate Monica May 4 '17 at 17:49
  • It does have the flaw of being executed at runtime, though, but that can be mitigated once more compilers properly support constexpr lambdas. – Justin Time - Reinstate Monica May 4 '17 at 17:49
11

I'm going to play.

You want to do a curried fold over addition. We could solve this one problem, or we could solve a class of problems that include this.

So, first, addition:

auto add = [](auto lhs, auto rhs){ return std::move(lhs)+std::move(rhs); };

That expresses the concept of addition pretty well.

Now, folding:

template<class F, class T>
struct folder_t {
  F f;
  T t;
  folder_t( F fin, T tin ):
    f(std::move(fin)),
    t(std::move(tin))
  {}
  template<class Lhs, class Rhs>
  folder_t( F fin, Lhs&&lhs, Rhs&&rhs):
    f(std::move(fin)),
    t(
      f(std::forward<Lhs>(lhs), std::forward<Rhs>(rhs))
    )
  {}
  template<class U>
  folder_t<F, std::result_of_t<F&(T, U)>> operator()( U&& u )&&{
    return {std::move(f), std::move(t), std::forward<U>(u)};
  }
  template<class U>
  folder_t<F, std::result_of_t<F&(T const&, U)>> operator()( U&& u )const&{
    return {f, t, std::forward<U>(u)};
  }
  operator T()&&{
    return std::move(t);
  }
  operator T() const&{
    return t;
  }
};

It takes a seed value and a T, then permits chaining.

template<class F, class T>
folder_t<F, T> folder( F fin, T tin ) {
  return {std::move(fin), std::move(tin)};
}

Now we connect them.

auto adder = folder(add, 0);
std::cout << adder(2)(3)(4) << "\n";

We can also use folder for other operations:

auto append = [](auto vec, auto element){
  vec.push_back(std::move(element));
  return vec;
};

Use:

auto appender = folder(append, std::vector<int>{});
for (int x : appender(1)(2)(3).get())
    std::cout << x << "\n";

Live example.

We have to call .get() here because for(:) loops doesn't understand our folder's operator T(). We can fix that with a bit of work, but .get() is easier.

  • This is cool! And I think it can be used as replacement for std::bind in some cases :) – Slava May 5 '17 at 13:37
  • Interesting. You wrote fold and I wrote curry. Wonder what OP actually wants. – Barry May 5 '17 at 13:59
  • 1
    @Barry Obviously "an ad-hoc, informally-specified, bug-ridden, slow implementation of half of Common Lisp" – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 5 '17 at 14:15
  • 1
    @Yakk TBH I'm mostly just baffled at how many upvotes some of these top answers have. – Barry May 5 '17 at 20:05
  • 1
    @Barry It was linked in the sidebar. /shrug. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 5 '17 at 20:26
10

If you are open to using libraries, this is really easy in Boost's Hana:

double plus4_impl(double a, double b, double c, double d) {
    return a + b + c + d;
}

constexpr auto plus4 = boost::hana::curry<4>(plus4_impl);

And then using it is just as you desire:

int main() {
    std::cout << plus4(1)(1.0)(3)(4.3f) << '\n';
    std::cout << plus4(1, 1.0)(3)(4.3f) << '\n'; // you can also do up to 4 args at a time
}
4

All these answers seem terribly complicated.

auto f = [] (double a) {
    return [=] (double b) {
        return [=] (double c) {
            return a + b + c;
        };
    };
};

does exactly what you want, and it works in C++11, unlike many or perhaps most other answers here.

Note that it does not use std::function which incurs a performance penalty, and indeed, it can likely be inlined in many cases.

-8

Here is a state pattern singleton inspired approach using operator() to change state.

Edit: Exchanged the unnecessary assignment for an initialization.

#include<iostream>
class adder{
private:
  adder(double a)val(a){}
  double val = 0.0;
  static adder* mInstance;
public:
  adder operator()(double a){
    val += a;
    return *this;}
  static adder add(double a){
    if(mInstance) delete mInstance;
    mInstance = new adder(a);
    return *mInstance;}
  double get(){return val;}
};
adder* adder::mInstance = 0;
int main(){
  adder a = adder::add(1.0)(2.0)(1.0);
  std::cout<<a.get()<<std::endl;
  std::cout<<adder::add(1.0)(2.0)(3.0).get()<<std::endl;
  return 0;
}
  • 3
    I'm not one of the downvoters, but it is probably because the code is poorly formatted, it is as far from a zero cost abstraction as possible (that is, compared to other, cleaner, C++ solutions, it is extremely slow and painful to look at), and the OP implied that he wanted a FP style solution, whereas this is about as far from FP as possible. – rationalcoder May 5 '17 at 2:35
  • Your constructor assigns to the member (rather than initializes) but you also have implicit initialization specified on the val member, so that's unnecessary. – JDługosz May 5 '17 at 6:35
  • 1
    The :val(0) is still unnecessary. The use of mInstance is so rediculus that it overshadows everything else. Based on the initial comment, you should post a question on Code Review so you can learn what's so horrifying about it. – JDługosz May 5 '17 at 9:30
  • 1
    The code doesn't even compile (missing a colon and semicolon). Once you fix that and make the constructor public, you can completely eliminate mInstance and the add method and simply do adder(1.0)(2.0)(1.0);. This pattern of yours, that you say we would use if we "learned some object oriented design patterns" is completely useless. – DarkDust May 5 '17 at 12:22
  • 5
    Oh my god, that is horrible. In any case, remove mInstance, replace add's entire body with return {a};, and your code becomes less ridiculously wasteful. That heap allocation and static state does nothing. Still doesn't solve OP's problm, as OP doesn't want the .get(), but it at least wouldn't be horrible. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 5 '17 at 12:55

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