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I am deliberatly quoting a similar question here although I wouldn't want as many files as there are different values in column 1. For example, from:

A.B|100|20
A.B|101|20
A.X|101|30
A.X|1000|20
B.Y|1|1
B.Y|1|2

I would like to have it split into x files, with each files containing at max 5 lines. In the example, I would want 2 files:

A.B|100|20
A.B|101|20
A.X|101|30
A.X|1000|20

and

B.Y|1|1
B.Y|1|2

awk -F\| '{print>$1}' file1

For this example, I could easily reach the goal in 2 steps. For my real file, I want to split a big file that is around 200Gig with 10 millions unique values in the first column. I would like each file to have around 1,000,000 lines (i.e. a flexible threshold). Making it in 2 steps is not feasible as I can't afford to have millions of files generated. Any idea?

6
  • Well, with 10 million unique "keys" and maximum of 5 lines per file you'd still end up with at least 2 million files. Maybe if you old us what needs to be done, we may assist on how it should be done. May 4, 2017 at 13:48
  • it's unclear, you wrote files containing at max 5 lines , but your frst output contains 4 lines. Then, you can't afford to have millions of files generated but you want to split a big file at same time. Sounds inconsistently May 4, 2017 at 13:49
  • Sorry for the confusion. I edited my question again.
    – Sara
    May 4, 2017 at 13:54
  • the only problem here is that a group of same unique values can intersect the line number boundary. That means that same values can occupy for ex. the range from 990,000 to 1,500,000 lines. How would you break such group in that case? May 4, 2017 at 14:10
  • That's the problem. I could use "split" to have chunks of the data with a fixed line number, but I would have intersecting values. In my mind, I would like to have something keep on adding values until the threshold is reached. That implies a flexible threshold: once 1,000,000 lines threshold is reached, stop adding values.
    – Sara
    May 4, 2017 at 14:43

1 Answer 1

1

with double scanning the file you can do

$ awk -F\| -v size=5 'NR==FNR  {a[$1]++; next} 
               FNR==1 || p!=$1 {if(count+a[$1]>=size) {f++; count=0} 
                                else count+=a[$1]; p=$1} 
                               {print > "_file_"f+0}' file{,}

$ head _f*
==> _file_0 <==
A.B|100|20
A.B|101|20
A.X|101|30
A.X|1000|20

==> _file_1 <==
B.Y|1|1
B.Y|1|2

note however that if one of the unique keys can have more records than the desired file length, the non-splitting and keeping the max file length will conflict. In this script, I assumed non-splitting is more important. For example, for the same input file change, set size=1. The keys won't be split into separate files, but file lengths will be more than 1.

1
  • idk since the question isn't clear but there MAY be better solutions possible than reading a 200 Gig file twice and storing 10 million+ values in memory. btw use of an unparenthesized expression on the right side of output redirection is undefined behavior per POSIX so YMMV if you don't tweak it to print > ("_file_"f+0) instead. Also you'll certainly have to add logic to close the output files as you go to avoid a "too many open files" error if you aren't using GNU awk.
    – Ed Morton
    May 4, 2017 at 17:49

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