2

I have four vectors containing x, y, radius and weight information on centres of circles. I would like to sort them in order of weight (highest to lowest), but I really have no idea how or where to start with this. I could put all the vectors in an Eigen::Tensor to keep the data gathered in one 4d matrix if that would help. But other than that I don't know.

Each of the vectors contain 134 elements, but since it's only one of them having to be sorted that means the sorting algorithm doesn't matter all that much.

Does anyone have a hint on where to start?

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3 Answers 3

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You can create a 5th vector of indices, sort the vector of indices according to one of the 4 vectors, then reorder all 4 vectors (and also sort the vector of indices) in O(n) time. Example to sort 3 vectors according to one of them (the ages vector). The vector of indices I is created then sorted according to A (using lambda compare), then all 3 vectors and I are reordered according to I by undoing the "cycles" in I.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    std::vector <int> A;                // ages
    std::vector <std::string> N;        // names
    std::vector <int> Z;                // zip codes
    std::vector <size_t> I;             // indices
    int tA;
    std::string tN;
    int tZ;

    A.push_back(37);
    N.push_back("Ted");
    Z.push_back(54211);
    A.push_back(21);
    N.push_back("John");
    Z.push_back(53421);
    A.push_back(31);
    N.push_back("Fred");
    Z.push_back(52422);
    A.push_back(21);
    N.push_back("Sam");
    Z.push_back(51422);
    // display the vectors
    for(size_t i = 0; i < A.size(); i++)
        std::cout << std::setw(6) << N[i]
            << std::setw(8) << Z[i]
            << std::setw(4) << A[i] << std::endl;
    std::cout << std::endl;
    // initialize the vector of indices
    for(size_t i = 0; i < A.size(); i++)
        I.push_back(i);
    // sort I according to A
    std::stable_sort(I.begin(), I.end(),
        [&A](size_t i, size_t j) {return 
        A[i] < A[j];});
    // reorder A, N, Z in place also restore I
    // time complexity is O(n)
    for(size_t i = 0; i < A.size(); i++){
        size_t j, k;
        if(i != I[i]){
            tA = A[i];
            tN = N[i];
            tZ = Z[i];
            k = i;
            while(i != (j = I[k])){
                A[k] = A[j];
                N[k] = N[j];
                Z[k] = Z[j];
                I[k] = k;
                k = j;
            }
            A[k] = tA;
            N[k] = tN;
            Z[k] = tZ;
            I[k] = k;
        }
    }
    // display the sorted vectors
    for(size_t i = 0; i < A.size(); i++)
        std::cout << std::setw(6) << N[i]
            << std::setw(8) << Z[i]
            << std::setw(4) << A[i] << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
0
1

With ranges-v3, you may do something like

ranges::sort(
    ranges::view::zip(xs, ys, radiuses, weights),
    std::greater<>{}, // decreasing order
    [](const auto& t){ return std::get<3>(t); }); // Projection: use weight

Demo

But having class Circle would make sense, that would avoid to zip the arrays, and allow to have a shorter projection.

0

Perhaps it makes more sense to first restructure your code and convert four vectors into one vectors of structures. Something like that:

struct CircleInfo
{
    int x, y, radius, weight;
};

std::vector<CircleInfo> circles;

Then, if you want to sort by radius:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

struct CircleInfo
{
    int x, y, radius, weight;
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<CircleInfo> circles;
    CircleInfo ci1 = { 1,1,1,1 };
    CircleInfo ci2 = { 3,3,3,3 };
    circles.push_back(ci2);
    circles.push_back(ci1);
    std::cout << "before sort circles[0].radius: " << circles[0].radius << std::endl;
    std::sort(circles.begin(), circles.end(), [](const CircleInfo& c1, const CircleInfo& c2) {
        return c1.radius < c2.radius;
    });
    std::cout << "aftern sort circles[0].radius: " << circles[0].radius << std::endl;
}

Output:

before sort circles[0].radius: 3
after sort circles[0].radius: 1

This code uses std::sort with custom function that compares two circles. To compare by radius you'd need to update it to compare c1.weight with c2.weight.

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  • I really like this one. I might be able to draw use from the data being in structs later on as well. Thank you, Pavel.
    – asdfghjkl
    May 4, 2017 at 17:36
  • How can I create a new CircleInfo struct for every point without having to manually do it? I guess I have to use new somehow, but I don't understand the way that works really.
    – asdfghjkl
    May 4, 2017 at 18:48
  • @asdfghjkl you can create CircleInfo without using dynamic allocation: CircleInfo ci12 = { 1,1,1,1 }; where values are for x, y, radius, weight. Then you add CircleInfo structs to vector using push_back: circles.push_back(ci1);
    – Pavel P
    May 4, 2017 at 19:01
  • I'm probably just not understanding it right, but I have 134 points that I need to put in a struct each. This is my function: pastebin.com/LhbSiLTz I have a 3d matrix (tensor) containing votes for where there's a circle. If the votes >= threshold then they get replaced by a 1, if not they get replaced by a 0, so the local maxima are marked by ones. Then x,y,radius and weight are calculated. But I can't push the struct into the vector. I get this error: `Error C2664 'CircleData::CircleData(CircleData &&)': cannot convert argument 1 from 'CircleData *' to 'const CircleData &'
    – asdfghjkl
    May 4, 2017 at 19:23
  • Sorry, I have to just read the errors sometimes even though I don't understand them at first. I should write circles.emplace_back(data); instead. That fixes it.
    – asdfghjkl
    May 4, 2017 at 20:05

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