I'm writing an app using ReSwift implementation of redux. I wonder, when to use action creators and why?

After reading tutorial, I fill like creators just create action only after checking inner state. For example, I have a button, after user pressed it I want to start some process if I'm in state A. So, I have to write an action creator, which will check current state and then return correct action, or not action at all. Then dispatch this action from the same place.

Am I right? I will really appreciate any example.

Second question - where I have to implement it?

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I covered this topic in my blog post Idiomatic Redux: Why Use Action Creators?. Recapping the key points:

  1. Basic abstraction: Rather than writing action type strings in every component that needs to create the same type of action, put the logic for creating that action in one place.
  2. Documentation: The parameters of the function act as a guide for what data is needed to go into the action.
  3. Brevity and DRY: There could be some larger logic that goes into preparing the action object, rather than just immediately returning it.
  4. Encapsulation and consistency: Consistently using action creators means that a component doesn't have to know any of the details of creating and dispatching the action, and whether it's a simple "return the action object" function or a complex thunk function with numerous async calls. It just calls this.props.someBoundActionCreator(arg1, arg2), and lets the action creator worry about how to handle things.
  5. Testability and flexibility: if a component only ever calls a function passed in as a prop rather than explicitly referencing dispatch, it becomes easy to write tests for the component that pass in a mock version of the function instead. It also enables reusing the component in another situation, or even with something other than Redux.
  • okay, I think I got it. still - could you please answer on this question: I have a button wich has to start process of sending info somewhere. but logically, it must send it only if my state supports this sending. otherwise, it has to send other action - message for user, that it's not ready. where do I have to put this logic of determination of actions? – Vladyslav Zavalykhatko May 8 '17 at 4:45
  • That would be a good use case for a thunk function. Thunks have access to getState(), so a thunk can check the values in state and decide whether or not to dispatch. Per my comment, the component just calls this.props.someFunction() and doesn't have to worry about it further. I have an example of some common thunk patterns at gist.github.com/markerikson/ea4d0a6ce56ee479fe8b356e099f857e . – markerikson May 8 '17 at 15:42

Redux.js and ReSwift behave quite differently.

Let me clear things up before getting to your question.

Clearing up Redux.js/ReSwift confusions

Action Creators in ReSwift

"Action creators" is a rather specialized term in Redux.js, but the type is defined like this in ReSwift as of v4:

public typealias ActionCreator = (_ state: State, _ store: Store) -> Action?

So contrary to general advice, you do have access to the state at the point of dispatching the action. You don't need a Thunk implementation, although Thunks or Epics can help in more complex cases.

"Action Creators help encapsulate action creation details"

That was quite a mouthful :)

Redux.js actions are object literals. Redux actions, if you were to write them in Swift, would be more like Dictionarys. That's how Action Creators in Redux.js provide the convenience of factories (as in "Factory", the Gang of Four design pattern).

The ReSwift.Action type is usually implemented in custom value types (structs), though. ReSwift does not suffer from that problems of Redux.js actions. That means by creating a custom action type in ReSwift, the benefit of centralizing action creation in one function goes away. The initializer of your type does provide this already.

That paints a totally different picture.

And that's probably why ReSwift.Store.ActionCreator passes in the state: to provide any benefit at all. At the cost of a different kind of API than Redux.

Application to your question

For example, I have a button, after user pressed it I want to start some process if I'm in state A. So, I have to write an action creator, which will check current state and then return correct action, or not action at all. Then dispatch this action from the same place.

There are a couple of ways to achieve that.

If you have access to the store variable to call dispatch, you also have access to its current state property. You can ask the store for the state the app is in and act accordingly. Usually, you'd write store subscribers to get "push notifications" of store changes, but in cases like this you can also ask the store.

That means the following would be a totally valid implementation:

let currentState = store.state
let action: Action = {
    if currentState.someSubstate == "A" {
        return ActionWhenInStateA()
    } else {
        return ActionWhenNotInStateA()
    }
}
store.dispatch(action)

Since ReSwift Stores are not supposed to receive dispatch commands from different threads, you can rely on the state from line 1 to be the same in the last line, where you dispatch.

TL;DR: you do not need ActionCreator to achieve this. But you can if you like to write "east-oriented" code, leaning on callbacks instead of property queries:

store.dispatch { state, _ in
    if state.someSubstate == "A" {
        return ActionWhenInStateA()
    } else {
        return ActionWhenNotInStateA()
    }
}

Action creators simply create actions to be dispatched by your store to be processed by your Reducer.

You should use an Action Creator for convenience to prevent declaring an object each time you need to dispatch an action. For example, imagine the following example:

<button onClick={() => { dispatch({ type: 'MY_ACTION'); }}>

It is cleaner to write:

<button onClick={() => { dispatch(myActionCreator()); }}

And it is more straightforward to understand too.

It is useful inside component (e.g. React), where you can inject them trough props and call them as normal functions (e.g. in button clicks).

There are several ways to declare an action creators. There is no pattern to do that. You can create a file called actions a drop them in this file, you can write them together with your reducer. Is up to you.

You can check the documentation to clarify your ideas. Also you can see this interesting pattern to declare your action creators.

Hope it helps.

  • yes, it helps. could you please also tell me, where I should declare logic of choosing actions, depending on state? for example, I want to check if I in state A and then perform AAction, if I in state B - BAction. – Vladyslav Zavalykhatko May 7 '17 at 17:06
  • I see. Your current state is not directly related to your actions. You do not have an Action A for an state A. Your actions mutate your state. You can pass anything to them and they need to have a type property that identifies the action. For example, you can have an action that changes a property isLoading to true in your state. And another to change it back to false. You have two actions changing the same property. You have no limitation on Action A belongs to State A. You simply call them and mutate the state as you need. – Andrey Luiz May 7 '17 at 17:16
  • I mean another problem :) let's say I have a button wich has to start process of sending info somewhere. but logically, it must send it only if my state supports this sending. otherwise, it has to send other action - message for user, that it's not ready. where do I have to put this logic of determination of actions? or I just send an action 'ButtonTapped' and do other stuff in reducers? – Vladyslav Zavalykhatko May 7 '17 at 17:24
  • You can base your decision on your actual state tree. For example, if you already have some info from an API, you do not need to perform the ajax call again, right? You can check your state for this. Think the state as a database which stores data for you to use and to make decisions in your application. Regarding the logic, to call the right action based on your state is up to you. It can be called from a component or from an async action. Depends on your workflow. If you show me some code I can help you better. – Andrey Luiz May 8 '17 at 22:31

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