2

I have the following snippet:

a = np.array([1, 2, 3])
b = np.array([False, True])
print(a[b])

It triggers a VisibleDeprecationWarning as expected.

Now when I import a certain module, that warning is no longer shown:

import questionable_module
a = np.array([1, 2, 3])
b = np.array([False, True])
print(a[b])

How do I need to modify my code in order to re-enable all warnings? I neither want nor can change the questionable_module. I would prefer to do it in the code instead of command line arguments, if possible.

The questionable_module is Glumpy but I'm looking for a solution that works independently of what other modules do.

3
  • 1
    What is this "questionable_module" and how does it affect the "warnings" settings?
    – MSeifert
    May 7, 2017 at 15:00
  • 1
    @MSeifert: It's Glumpy, a rather large module for OpenGL. I don't understand what it does to warning, but anyway, I'm looking for a solution that works independently of what other modules do.
    – Michael
    May 7, 2017 at 15:03
  • There are lots of dials one can turn with warnings. The Python warning system is really complicated and to appropriatly answer the question it's necessary to find out how they altered (or should I say ... messed) with the warnings. It was actually possible to search their source code and I think I've found the offender.
    – MSeifert
    May 7, 2017 at 15:28

2 Answers 2

2

I checked and it seems for glumpy they use logging.captureWarnings to catch the warnings:

import warnings
import logging
logging.captureWarnings(True)

Source

I'm not sure if they intended to log all warnings but you can disable it with

import logging
logging.captureWarnings(False)

Other possibilities (that don't apply in this case) but could be helpful in the future:

In general it could also be that they adjusted the warnings.simplefilter you could enable it again like this:

import warnings
warnings.simplefilter("always", VisibleDeprecationWarning)

or reset it to the default with warnings.resetwarnings.

If it's actually a NumPy floating point warning you, then you need to use numpy.seterr:

import numpy as np
np.seterr(all='warn')

But it could also be that the questionable_module really replaces or patches the functions in a way that they actually never get to the point where the warning is raised. In that case you probably can't do anything.

0

Try this:

import warnings
import questionable_module
warnings.resetwarnings() # Reset the warnings filter. This discards the effect of all previous calls to filterwarnings(), including that of the -W command line options and calls to simplefilter().
warnings.simplefilter('default')
a = np.array([1, 2, 3])
b = np.array([False, True])
print(a[b])

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