3

I have a large flat text file with lines that hold name/value pairs ("varname=value"). These pairs are seperated by a multi-character delimiter. So a single line in this file might look like this:

var1=value1|^|var2=value2|^|var3=value3|^|var4=value4

Each line holds about 50 name/value pairs.

I need to iterate through the lines of this file (there are about 100,000 lines) and store the name/value pairs in a hash so that

$field{'var1'} = value1
$field{'var2'} = value2
etc...

What I did was this:

# $line holds a single line from the file

my @fields = split( /\Q|^|\E/, $line );
foreach my $field (@fields) {
  my ($name, $value) = split( /=/, $field );
  $hash{$name} = $value;
}

Doing this for each line of the entire file takes (on my PC) about 2 seconds. This doesn't seem like a long time, but I really want to speed this up by quite a bit.

Of this 2 seconds, the first split takes about 0.6 seconds, while the foreach loop takes about 1.4 seconds. So I thought I'd get rid of the foreach loop and put it all in a single split:

%hash = split( /\Q|^|\E|=/, $line );

Much to my surprise, parsing the entire file this way took a full second longer! My question isn't really why this takes longer (although it would be a nice bonus to understand why), but my question is if there are any other (faster) ways to get the job done.

Thanks in advance.

------ Edit below this line ------

I just found out that changing this:

%hash = split( /\Q|^|\E|=/, $line );

into this:

$line =~ s/\Q|^|\E/=/g;
%hash = split( /=/, $line );

makes it three times faster! Parsing the entire file this way now takes just over a second...

------ Snippet below this line ------

use strict;
use Time::HiRes qw( time );

my $line = "a=1|^|b=2|^|c=3|^|d=4|^|e=5|^|f=6|^|g=7|^|h=8|^|i=9|^|j=10|^|k=11|^|l=12|^|m=13|^|n=14|^|o=15|^|p=16|^|q=17|^|r=18|^|s=19|^|t=20|^|u=21|^|v=22|^|w=23|^|x=24|^|y=25|^|z=26|^|aa=27|^|ab=28|^|ac=29|^|ad=30|^|ae=31|^|af=32|^|ag=33|^|ah=34|^|ai=35|^|aj=36|^|ak=37|^|al=38|^|am=39|^|an=40|^|ao=41|^|ap=42|^|aq=43|^|ar=44|^|as=45|^|at=46|^|au=47|^|av=48|^|aw=49|^|ax=50";

ResetTimer();
my %hash;
for( my $i = 1; $i <= 100000; $i++ ) {
  my @fields = split( /\Q|^|\E/, $line );
  foreach my $field (@fields) {
    my ($name, $value) = split( /=/, $field );
    $hash{$name} = $value;
  }
}
print Elapsed() . "\n";

ResetTimer();
%hash = ();
for( my $i = 1; $i <= 100000; $i++ ) {
  %hash = split( /\Q|^|\E|=/, $line );
}
print Elapsed() . "\n";

ResetTimer();
%hash = ();
for( my $i = 1; $i<=100000; $i++ ) {
  $line =~ s/\Q|^|\E/=/g;
  %hash = split( /=/, $line );
}
print Elapsed() . "\n";

################################################################################################################################
BEGIN {
  my $startTime;
  sub ResetTimer {
    $startTime = time();
    return $startTime;
  }
  sub Elapsed {
    return time() - $startTime;
  }
}
  • 5
    A bit more sample data might be helpful. OR a runnable snippet. – Sobrique May 8 '17 at 9:39
  • I've added a runnable snippet above. :) – Zippy1970 May 8 '17 at 10:23
  • Contributed an example with some comparative tests. (e.g. using Benchmark) – Sobrique May 8 '17 at 10:38
  • If you really need the extra speed, you may want to consider writing primitive purpose built split in XS. – Sinan Ünür May 8 '17 at 10:43
6

I can't easily answer your performance question, because I'd need a test case. But I'd guess that it's to do with how the regular expression is being processed.

You can see what that's doing with use re 'debug';, and that'll print the regular expression steps.

But for the broader question - I'd probably just tackle it with a global (assuming your data is as simple as the example):

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings; 
use Data::Dumper;

while ( <DATA> ) { 
   my %row = m/(\w+)=(\w+)/g;
   print Dumper \%row;
}

__DATA__
var1=value1|^|var2=value2|^|var3=value3|^|var4=value4

You can use lookahead/behind to match delimiters if you've got more complicated things in there, but because it's one regex per line, you're invoking the regex engine less often, and that'll probably be faster. (But I can't tell you for sure without a test case).

If your data is more complicated, then perhaps:

my %row = s/\Q|^|\E/\n/rg =~ m/(.*)=(.*)/g;

This will 'force' splitting the input into a new line, and then match 'anything' = 'anything'. But that's probably overkill unless your values include whitespace/pipes/metachars.

With editing your test case to use Benchmark:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark qw ( cmpthese );

my $line =
  "a=1|^|b=2|^|c=3|^|d=4|^|e=5|^|f=6|^|g=7|^|h=8|^|i=9|^|j=10|^|k=11|^|l=12|^|m=13|^|n=14|^|o=15|^|p=16|^|q=17|^|r=18|^|s=19|^|t=20|^|u=21|^|v=22|^|w=23|^|x=24|^|y=25|^|z=26|^|aa=27|^|ab=28|^|ac=29|^|ad=30|^|ae=31|^|af=32|^|ag=33|^|ah=34|^|ai=35|^|aj=36|^|ak=37|^|al=38|^|am=39|^|an=40|^|ao=41|^|ap=42|^|aq=43|^|ar=44|^|as=45|^|at=46|^|au=47|^|av=48|^|aw=49|^|ax=50";

sub double_split {
   my %hash;
   my @fields = split( /\Q|^|\E/, $line );
   foreach my $field (@fields) {
      my ( $name, $value ) = split( /=/, $field );
      $hash{$name} = $value;
   }
}

sub single_split {
   my %hash = split( /\Q|^|\E|=/, $line );
}

sub re_replace_then_split {
   $line =~ s/\Q|^|\E/=/g;
   my %hash = split( /=/, $line );
}

sub single_regex {
   my %hash = $line =~ m/(\w+)=(\w+)/g;
}

sub compound {
   my %hash = $line =~ s/\Q|^|\E/\n/rg =~ m/(.*)=(.*)/g;
}

cmpthese(
   1_000_000,
   {  "Double Split"                 => \&double_split,
      "single split with regex"      => \&single_split,
      "Replace then split"           => \&re_replace_then_split,
      "Single Regex"                 => \&single_regex,
      "regex to linefeed them match" => \&compound
   }
);

Looks like the results come out like:

                                 Rate Double Split single split with regex Single Regex Replace then split regex to linefeed them match
Double Split                  18325/s           --                     -4%         -34%               -56%                         -97%
single split with regex       19050/s           4%                      --         -31%               -54%                         -97%
Single Regex                  27607/s          51%                     45%           --               -34%                         -96%
Replace then split            41733/s         128%                    119%          51%                 --                         -93%
regex to linefeed them match 641026/s        3398%                   3265%        2222%              1436%                           --

... I'm a bit suspicious of that last, because that's absurdly faster. There's probably caching of results happening there.

But looking at it, what's slowing you down is the alternation in the regex:

sub single_split_with_alt {
   my %hash = split( /\Q|^|\E|=/, $line );
}

sub single_split {
      my %hash = split( /[\|\^\=]+/, $line );
}

(I know that latter might not be quite what you want, but it's for illustrative purposes)

Gives:

                Rate  alternation single split
alternation  19135/s           --         -37%
single split 30239/s          58%           --

But there does come a point where this is moot, because your limiting factor is disk IO, not CPU.

  • 1
    "because your limiting factor is disk IO, not CPU." Probably not. On my really old system with a slow SSD, it takes 0.7 seconds to read an chomp every line of a 100,000 line file with 50 such fields on each line. – Sinan Ünür May 8 '17 at 11:08
  • 2
    compound() is actually the slowest of the bunch but comes out fastest in your example because it's run against an already altered $line (it's changed in re_replace_then_split() ). – Zippy1970 May 8 '17 at 15:19
  • Well spotted. I figured there was a reason that was so fast, but hadn't dug deeper. (Rerunning my test without including the replace-then-split gives more sensible numbers) – Sobrique May 8 '17 at 15:22

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