4

Following code behaves as expected when running from terminal:

perl -e 'kill -2, $$; warn HERE, $/'

It sends itself SIGINT and dies before reaching "HERE":

~# perl -e 'kill -2, $$; warn HERE, $/'

~# echo $?
130
~#

The problem: same code fails to kill self PID when running from shell script:

~# cat 1.sh
perl -e 'kill -2, $$; warn HERE, $/'
~#
~# sh 1.sh
HERE
~#
~# echo $?
0
~#

On the other hand, replacing perl's kill by a shell's one works OK:

~# cat 2.sh
perl -e 'qx/kill -2 $$/; warn HERE, $/'
~#
~# sh 2.sh
~#
~# echo $?
130
~#

Not really understand what is happening here, please help..

  • By the way, kill INT => -$$ is a nicer way of writing kill -2, $$. – ikegami May 8 '17 at 16:32
5

First of all,

 kill -2, $$

is better written as

 kill 2, -$$

An even better alternative is

 kill INT => -$$

These send SIGINT to the specified process group.


Your main question appears to be why the two shells behave differently. This section explains that.

The process group represents an application.

When you launch a program from an interactive shell, it's not part of a larger application, so the shell creates a new process group for the program.

However, processes created by a script (i.e. a non-interactive shell) are part of the same application as the script itself, so the shell doesn't create a new process group for them.

You can visualize this using the following:

  • sh -i <<< 'perl -e '\''system ps => -o => "pid,ppid,pgrp,comm"'\''' outputs the following:

    $ perl -e 'system ps => -o => "pid,ppid,pgrp,comm"'
      PID  PPID  PGRP COMMAND
     8179  8171  8179 bash
    14654  8179 14654 sh
    14655 14654 14655 perl
    14656 14655 14655 ps
    
    $ exit
    

    In interactive mode, perl is at the head of perl and ps's program group.

  • sh <<< 'perl -e '\''system ps => -o => "pid,ppid,pgrp,comm"'\''' outputs the following:

      PID  PPID  PGRP COMMAND
     8179  8171  8179 bash
    14584  8179 14584 sh
    14585 14584 14584 perl
    14586 14585 14584 ps
    

    In non-interactive mode, sh is at the head of perl and ps's program group.


Your failures are the result of not sending the signal to the head of the process group (i.e. the application). Had you checked, the error kill reported was ESRCH ("No such process").

ESRCH The pid or process group does not exist. [...]

To kill the current process's process group, replace the improper

kill INT => -$$           # XXX

with

kill INT => -getpgrp()    # Kill the application

You can make your perl the head of its own process group by simply calling the following:

setpgrp();

Test:

$ sh <<< 'perl -e '\''system ps => ( -o => "pid,ppid,pgrp,comm" )'\'''
  PID  PPID  PGRP COMMAND
 8179  8171  8179 bash
16325  8179 16325 sh
16326 16325 16325 perl
16327 16326 16325 ps

$ sh <<< 'perl -e '\''setpgrp(); system ps => ( -o => "pid,ppid,pgrp,comm" )'\'''
  PID  PPID  PGRP COMMAND
 8179  8171  8179 bash
16349  8179 16349 sh
16350 16349 16350 perl
16351 16350 16350 ps

That's not something you normally want to do.


Finally, the Perl code

kill INT => -$pgrp

is equivalent to the following call of the kill command-line utility:

kill -s INT -$pgrp
kill -INT -$pgrp
kill -2 -$pgrp

You were missing - in your qx// program, so it was sending SIGINT to the identified process rather than the identified program group.

  • I'm disappointed you picked the "answer" that doesn't even answer your question (why the two shells behave differently). – ikegami May 14 '17 at 16:52
  • Sorry to hear you're disappointed, didn't mean to.. Both explanations look pretty equal for me, seriously. Am I wrong? Why do you think the picked one doesn't answer my question? – MrCricket May 14 '17 at 20:54
  • Both explanations? I only see one. Both of our answers explain why how process group works, but that's not what you asked why the two shells behave differently, and they other answer doesn't explain that at all. Only mine answers that (the concept of applications). Did I miss something? /// In fact, the other answer claims the two shells could behave identically (by saying the process group creation by the non-interactive shell is only likely), but that's wrong! – ikegami May 14 '17 at 21:09
  • I think a likely word in another answer refers to non-existent process group, and doesn't mean probably a new pr group is created. IMHO the sentence just says perl sends SIGTERM to foreign (and probably non-existent) pr group.. – MrCricket May 14 '17 at 21:28
  • Likely does indeed refer to non-existent. If it's likely it's non-existent, that means it's likely it didn't get created, which means there's a possibility it could get created, but that's completely wrong. Non-interactive shells don't create the process group, and as I explained, the reason for that is because the shell sees perl as part of the same application. – ikegami May 14 '17 at 21:52
4

From your interactive terminal, the perl process kills the process group of which it is a part. (The shell runs perl in its own process group.) The shell reports this unusual termination in $?:

t0   interactive shell (pid=123, pgrp=123)
       |
t1     +------> perl -e (pid=456, pgrp=456, parent=123)
       |          |
t2   (wait)      kill(-2, 456) (in perl, same as kill pgrp 456 w/ SIGINT)
       |          |
t3   (wait)     *SIGINT*
       |
t4   report $?

From your shell script, the perl process kills a (likely) non-existent process group and then exits successfully. Your interactive shell makes a new process group in which to run your shell script, and that script then runs perl as a child in the same process group.

t0   shell (pid=123, pgrp=123)
       |
t1     +-------> shell:1.sh (pid=456, pgrp=456, parent=123)
       |          |
t2   (wait)       +-------------> perl -e (pid=789, pgrp=456, parent=456)
       |          |                |
t3   (wait)     (wait)            kill pgrp 789 with SIGINT (error: no such pgrp)
       |          |                |
t4   (wait)     (wait)            exit success
       |          |
t5   (wait)     exit success
       |
t6   report $?

In your backticked (qx//) example, your interactive shell starts a shell process with a new process group. (Not that it matters here, but that process runs perl in its same process group.) Perl then runs as its own child the system kill command, the semantics of which differ from that of the perl kill. This grandchild command sends a SIGINT to the perl PID directly, rather than a SIGINT to a process group. Perl terminates, and that exit code is conveyed as the script's exit code, since it was the last command in the script.

This diagram is a little busier than the previous:

t0   shell (pid=123, pgrp=123)
       |
t1     +-------> shell:2.sh (pid=456, pgrp=456, parent=123)
       |          |
t2   (wait)       +----------> perl -e (pid=789, pgrp=456, parent=456)
       |          |             |
t3   (wait)     (wait)          +---------> /bin/kill SIGINT 789
       |          |             |             |
t4   (wait)     (wait)         *SIGINT*      exit success
       |          |
t5   (wait)     return $?
       |
t6   report $?
0

It works fine in this way:

perl -E 'say "kill "INT", $$; warn HERE, $/'

perl -E 'say "kill 2, $$; warn HERE, $/'

kill man page says:

A negative signal name is the same as a negative signal number, killing process groups instead of processes. For example, kill '-KILL', $pgrp and kill -9, $pgrp will send SIGKILL to the entire process group specified. That means you usually want to use positive not negative signals.

  • Thank for answer, but this still doesn't explain difference between kill -2, $$ and qx/kill -2 $$/ – MrCricket May 8 '17 at 12:31
  • pretty sure this'll be down to how $$ is being expanded. – Sobrique May 8 '17 at 14:04
  • qx/kill -2 $$/ calls OS kill cmd, but kill -2, $$ is pure perl code. – palik May 8 '17 at 14:08
  • sure, but why killing process group by perl kill doesn't work as OS kill? – MrCricket May 8 '17 at 14:32

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