81

In "old school" MSBuild projects - as still used by Windows Forms in VS2017 for example - files could be "nested" via a DependentUpon item in the csproj file.

I used this to group unit tests together in Noda Time, e.g.

<Compile Include="LocalDateTest.PeriodArithmetic.cs">
  <DependentUpon>LocalDateTest.cs</DependentUpon>
</Compile>

That led to easily-navigable tests:

Nested tests

I knowingly "lost" this feature when moving to project.json for .NET Core, but had hoped it would return when converting to MSBuild. However, it looks like MSBuild projects based on the .NET Core SDK (root element <Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk">) don't get the same treatment in Visual Studio 2017, even if an ItemGroup is added manually with the same elements as the "old school" project.

ASP.NET Core projects receive automatic nesting for minified CSS and Javascript, but it's not clear how to apply that to C# in .NET Core library projects.

100
0

I have it working in one of my Microsoft.NET.Sdk-style projects using something similar to the following:

<ItemGroup>
  <Compile Update="LocalDateTest.*.cs">
    <DependentUpon>LocalDateTest.cs</DependentUpon>
  </Compile>
</ItemGroup>

The trick here is to use Update instead of Include. This is because the implicit items are coming from a props file that is imported before the main project. An additional Include won't affect files that are already included, but they can be modified using Update.

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  • 2
    Okay, this is bizarre - I'm sure I tried that, and it wasn't working. It now is. Very, very bizarre. Ah - it's the "Update" rather than "Include". – Jon Skeet May 8 '17 at 11:12
  • 1
    I must admit I'm not exactly sure why the Include vs Update makes the difference. Would love one of the tooling folks to provide some additional info. – Matthew King May 8 '17 at 11:21
  • 1
    @MatthewKing: My guess is that it's because *.cs is already included by default, and that the nested element content is therefore ignored. – Jon Skeet May 8 '17 at 11:28
  • 1
    @JonSkeet, yeah... as you said it is bizarre... I tried it one more time in another project and it worked. I do want to nest tests behind classes they test, but it would be crazy to do it for hundreds of files manually... Even if I write an extension for this - project file won't look good. So I finally decided to always use Microsoft.NET.Sdk.Web even for class libraries. Now I don't have to configure nesting at all. – Pavel Agarkov Feb 28 '18 at 8:49
  • 1
    Ive just tested this and you need to use the same BuildAction name eg replace 'Compile' with 'Content' or 'None' based on you file properties. In my case it was 'Content' – SM3RKY Nov 13 '18 at 1:11
8
0

In Visual Studio 2019, I have a .NET Core 2.2 <Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk"> project in which I wanted the nicely-nested appsettings.json / appsettings.Development.json files, just like they do automatically for <Project Sdk="Microsoft.NET.Sdk.Web"> projects.

Here's what I had to add to the .CSPROJ:

  <ItemGroup>
    <Content Include="appsettings.json">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </Content>
    <Content Include="appsettings.Development.json">
      <DependentUpon>appsettings.json</DependentUpon>
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </Content>
  </ItemGroup>

After that, I had to unload/reload the project for the change to take effect in Solution Explorer. Note that I also set these files to always be copied to the output directory.

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2
0

If you using .netstandardx.x you can not use NestedIn . It's not working.

You can do that manually in your .csproj

<ItemGroup><Compile Include="BaseClass">ChildClass.cs</Compile></ItemGroup>
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2
0

If you want to wildcard it instead of hand-crafting each entry, adding these lines to your .csproj file means that anything like Foo.tests.cs automagically gets nested under Foo.cs

Tested and working in VS2019 with .NET Core 3.1.0

  <ItemGroup>
    <Compile Update="**\*.tests.cs">
      <DependentUpon>$([System.String]::Copy(%(Filename)).Replace(".tests",".cs"))</DependentUpon>
    </Compile>
  </ItemGroup>
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-6
0

If you use the same prefix it will nest files automatically.

Example:

AsemblyInfo.cs 
AsemblyInfo.local.cs
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  • 1
    The question was about .NET Core. Can you clarify your doubt? – Miguel Domingues Mar 14 '18 at 15:43
  • 2
    Have you tried it in VS2017? I have a solution open right now that has .NetFramework 4.7.1, Core 2.0 and Standard 2.1. I tried adding a Class.cs and then a Class.local.cs in a project of each type. No automatic nesting. Manual nesting works fine. VS2017 (15.7.4) – Andrew Steitz Aug 1 '18 at 18:21
  • Visual Studio 2017 15.9.3: Files with the same prefix are automatically being nested in Solution Explorer – brsfan Jun 27 '19 at 13:32

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