4

So I am trying to "join" 3 different mongo collections in a query. So what I need is multiple $lookup and $group statements in a mongo aggregation.

My 3 collections look like this:

users: (Pseudocode)

{
  _id,
  username: String,
  group: <some group._id>
}

groups:

{
  _id,
  name: String,
  _parent: <another group._id>,
}

lists: (these are "itemlists" which are owned by a user):

{
  _id,
  name: String,
  userId: <some user._id>
}

So what I would like to do is, given some group id or null (for groups with no parent - groups on the highest level) - get all groups inside of this group, find all users in these groups and also their lists.

So in the end I would need something like this:

[
  {
    _id: someGroupId,
    name: someGroupName,
    type: "group",
    users: [
      {
        _id: someUserId,
        name: someUserName,
        type: "user",
        lists: [
          ... and the same again for the lists (type: "list")
        ]
      },
      ... another user
    ]
  },
  ... another group
]

I hope you understand what I mean!

What I have now (thanks to Simon Tretter and lots of research) - please don't mind the Meteor agnostic syntax, you get the idea:

Groups.aggregate([
    { $match: { _parent: groupId } },
    { $sort: { name: 1 } },
    {
        $lookup: {
            from: 'users',
            localField: '_id',
            foreignField: 'group',
            as: 'users'
        }
    },
    {
        $unwind: {
            path: "$users",
            preserveNullAndEmptyArrays: true
        }
    },
    {
        $lookup: {
            from: 'lists',
            localField: 'users._id',
            foreignField: 'userId',
            as: 'users.lists'
        }
    },
    {
        $unwind: {
            path: "$users.lists",
            preserveNullAndEmptyArrays: true
        }
    },
    {
        $match: {
            $or: [
                { "users.lists": { $exists: false } },
                { "users.lists.supplier_id": supplierId }
            ]
        }
    },
    { $sort: { "users.lists.name": 1 } },
    {
        $project: {
            "name": 1,
            "type": { $literal: 'group' },
            "users._id": 1,
            "users.name": { $ifNull: ["$users.profile.company.name", "$users.username"] },
            "users.type": { $literal: 'user' },
            "users.lists._id": 1,
            "users.lists.name": 1,
            "users.lists.item_count": 1,
            "users.lists.type": { $literal: 'list' }
        }
    },
    {
        $group: {
            _id: '$users._id',
            name: { $first: "$users.name" },
            type: { $first: "$users.type" },
            children: {
                $push: "$users.lists"
            }
        }
    },
    { $sort: { "users.name": 1 } },
    // until here I have one document per user, with their lists inside the "children" key - all good!
    // now I have to group the users inside their groups ...
    // NOT WORKING: returns completely wrong stuff
    { $group: {
      _id: '$_id',
      name: { $first: "$name" },
      type: { $first: "$type" },
      children: {
        $push: "$users"
      }
    } },
    { $sort: { name: 1 } }
]);

I hope someone can get my on the right track ... the best similar stackoverflow question I could find didn't help me that much.

Thanks a bunch, best, P

  • 2
    This data schema looks more like it was developed for a relational database than for MongoDB. Is changing it an option? – Philipp May 9 '17 at 16:28
  • What especially would you change? appending the lists directly to each user?! In general: changing it completely is not really an option as this is an app in production. but the groups are a new feature so this could be changed. what data schema would you suggest? – Patrick DaVader May 9 '17 at 19:58
  • I know you mention meteor but are you able to at least use a latest MongoDB 3.4.4 instance as the server? Reason being there are features that should help this. I presume one problem here is the hierarchical structure of "group" entries. – Neil Lunn May 23 '17 at 3:30
  • Hmm it would be possible but definitely takes some effort ... could you please be a bit more specific and tell me which new features you are talking about which should help?! :) – Patrick DaVader May 23 '17 at 21:15
  • 1
    @PatrickDaVader The main case I'm thinking of depends on your "purpose" for "joining" this data. From that I mean if this is simply an exercise to return "joined" data, or whether there is an intent to "query" on certain conditions in the joined result. Your structure seems somewhat reminiscent of an "Object Graph", but it depends if you are searching the hierarchy or simply getting the "nested things" to current items. Could do with some clarity. Also please use the @ thingy when responding to comments. It notifies us of your message, rather than making us come looking for it. – Neil Lunn May 24 '17 at 2:54
7

Thanks to the help of @Veeram and a tiny bit of tweaking I ended up with the following working code:

Groups.aggregate([
    { $match: { _parent: groupId } },
    { $sort: { name: 1 } },
    {
        $lookup: {
            from: 'users',
            localField: '_id',
            foreignField: 'group',
            as: 'users'
        }
    },
    {
        $unwind: {
            path: "$users",
            preserveNullAndEmptyArrays: true
        }
    },
    {
        $lookup: {
            from: 'lists',
            localField: 'userId',
            foreignField: 'users._id',
            as: 'users.lists'
        }
    },
    {
        $unwind: {
            path: "$users.lists",
            preserveNullAndEmptyArrays: true
        }
    },
    {
        $match: {
            $or: [
                { "users.lists": { $exists: false } },
                { "users.lists.supplier_id": supplierId }
            ]
        }
    },
    { $sort: { "users.lists.name": 1 } },
    {
        $project: {
            "name": 1,
            "type": { $literal: 'group' },
            "users._id": 1,
            "users.name": { $ifNull: ["$users.profile.company.name", "$users.username"] },
            "users.type": { $literal: 'user' },
            "users.lists._id": 1,
            "users.lists.name": 1,
            "users.lists.item_count": 1,
            "users.lists.type": { $literal: 'list' }
        }
    },
    {
        $group: {
            _id: {
                _id: "$_id",
                name: "$name",
                type: "$type",
                user_id: "$users._id"
            },
            user_id: {
                $first: "$users._id"
            },
            name: {
                $first: "$users.name"
            },
            type: {
                $first: "$users.type"
            },
            children: {
                $push: "$users.lists"
            }
        }
    },
    { $sort: { name: 1 } },
    {
        $group: {
            _id: "$_id._id",
            name: {
                $first: "$_id.name"
            },
            type: {
                $first: "$_id.type"
            },
            children: {
                $push: {
                    _id: "$user_id",
                    name: "$name",
                    type: "$type",
                    children: "$children"
                }
            }
        }
    },
    { $sort: { name: 1 } }
]);
2

untested, but I would try something like this:

db.groups.aggregate(
[
  { $match: { _parent: groupId } },
  {
     $lookup: {
            from: 'users',
            localField: '_id',
            foreignField: 'group',
            as: 'users'
     }
  },  
  { $unwind: "$users" },
  { $lookup: {
    from: 'lists',
    localField: 'userId',
    foreignField: 'users._id',
    as: 'users.lists'
   }
  },
  { $group: {
    _id: "$_id",
    groupname: { $first: "$name" },
    users: {
      $push: "$users"
   }
  } }
])
1
+50

You'll have to use the group (_id: {_id: "$_id", name: "$name", type: "$type", user_id: "$users._id" }) information in the $group after your comment.

Something like

{
    $group: {
        _id: {
            _id: "$_id",
            name: "$name",
            type: "$type",
            user_id: "$users._id"
        },
        name: {
            $first: "$users.name"
        },
        type: {
            $first: "$users.type"
        },
        children: {
            $push: "$users.lists"
        }
    }
}, {
    $sort: {
        name: 1
    }
}, {
    $group: {
        _id: "$_id._id",
        name: {
            $first: "$_id.name"
        },
        type: {
            $first: "$_id.type"
        },
        users: {
            $push: {
                 _id:"$user_id",
                 name: "$name",
                 type: "$type",
                children: "$children"
            }
        }
    }
}
  • Thank you very much! Will try this asap and get back to you! – Patrick DaVader May 23 '17 at 21:15
  • You are very close @Veeram but the userId gets lost in the process and I do not really understand why. I end up with something like this: pastebin link could you please kindly help again?! :) when I look at your code it makes sense to me so I don't really understand why the _id gets lost. – Patrick DaVader May 24 '17 at 8:28
  • got it! please see my answer below! There are your 50 reps! Thanks a lot for your help! – Patrick DaVader May 24 '17 at 8:37
  • maybe just one more thing @Veeram: Any idea how to get rid of the "empty" children when there e.g. are no lists of a user? (please see my pastebin link) – Patrick DaVader May 24 '17 at 8:41
  • 1
    I don't think it is possible to remove children/users fields all together, but you can empty by adding $redact stage at the end. Something like { "$redact": { "$cond": [{ $gt : ["$_id", null] }, "$$DESCEND", "$$PRUNE" ] } } – user2683814 May 24 '17 at 22:10

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