12

Inside of an RxJS subject's subscribe callback, I want to await on an async function. Below is a code example which the typescript transpiler complains about saying:

Error:(131, 21) TS2304:Cannot find name 'await'.

async ngOnInit() {
  this.subscriber = dateSubscription.subscribe((date: Date) => {
    let dbKey = await this._someService.saveToDatabase(someObject);
    // wait for db write to finish before evaluating the next code
    // ... some other code here
  });
}

Usually I see this when trying to call await inside a non async function. Do I somehow need to make the subscribe callback async or am I going about this wrong? The function saveToDatabase is async and returns a promise resolving to the database primary key that was written to.

7

You do not need to use await, nor need to convert your Promise to an Observable.


CF this Tweet from Ben Lesh :

enter image description here


Here's an example with a mock for the function saveToDatabase :
(and the working Plunkr : https://plnkr.co/edit/7SDLvRS2aTw9gYWdIznS?p=preview)

const { Observable } = Rx;

const saveToDatabase = (date) =>
  new Promise(resolve =>
    setTimeout(() =>
      resolve(`${date} has been saved to the database`),
      1000));

const date$ = Observable.of(new Date()).delay(1000);

date$
  .do(x => console.log(`date received, trying to save it to database ...`))
  .switchMap(date => saveToDatabase(date))
  .do(console.log)
  .subscribe();

Output :
enter image description here

22

you can just directly add async signature to the anonymous function call in subscribe

 this.subscriber = dateSubscription.subscribe(async (date: Date) => {
    let dbKey = await this._someService.saveToDatabase(someObject);
    // wait for db write to finish before evaluating the next code
    // ... some other code here
  });
  • 3
    Why would that work? Does the observable implementation call await in subscribe? Didn't work for me, would love more info.. – Dean Radcliffe Jun 9 '18 at 5:17
  • This should be the accepted answer – Ramsés Corporales Rodríguez Aug 14 '18 at 12:37
  • 1
    This answer is wrong. You can put an async function in there but it will not behave the way you'd expect. For example, when you do Subject.next() to notify observables, the call will not complete until all the subscriptions have executed. However, if you put an async subscription in there the call to next() will complete immediately, Subject.next() will not wait for the async subscriptions. – MgSam Dec 3 '18 at 21:49
  • @MgSam is totally right, this is approach is elusive. Using await inside the subscriber function may introduce unexpected side effects, as the values emitted by the observable are not guaranteed to be processed gradually anymore. – Redstone Apr 5 at 7:59
2

Here's my method of solving this issue

const title = await new Promise<string>(resolve => 
  this.translate.get('MYBOOK-PAGE.PLEASE_REMOVE')
   .subscribe(translated => {
     resolve(translated)
   }));

Here what I'm doing is changing my Observable to a Promise

Note: Here the only problem is this is one time show ie. if you subscribe once you won't able to access it again. Suited me so sharing here.

0

You cannot await Observables directly, however you can await a Promise. You can simply use the .toPromise() method on the observables subscription. Consider the following:

async ngOnInit() {
  const date = await dateSubscription.toPromise();      
  let dbKey = await this._someService.saveToDatabase(someObject);
}

When you await the promise of the dateSubscription you'll be handed a Date object. Then you can continue with the next line of your execution, which makes reading your code more sequential.

Some people are thinking the angular will not wait for the ngOnInit to complete, it does not have a choice. Take a look at the resulting JavaScript from the given TypeScript here. As you can see, the ngOnInit will invoke the awaiter which internally manages and executes the underlying state-machine (generator). Angular doesn't have any control over that. It simply wants that method to invoke.

-1

async ngOnInit() { } is incorrect signature, because this is how Angular defines OnInit interface. It should returns void:

 export interface OnInit { ngOnInit(): void; }

If you have any promise to process after dateSubscription you can use Observable.fromPromise like

 dateSubscription
 .flatMap(x=>
      Observable.defer(Observable.fromObservable(this._someService.saveToDatabase(someObject)))
   ).subscribe()
  • fromPromise is unnecessary if you are using flatMap or defer. – paulpdaniels May 10 '17 at 5:08
  • You are incorrect, you can absolutely use async on the ngOnInit. – David Pine May 10 '17 at 12:00
  • You have to implement an interface defined by Angular. You can put async but Angular won't do then on OnInit and won't wait. – Julia Passynkova May 10 '17 at 13:17
  • 1
    Angular will wait, angular doesn't have a choice. The resulting .js wraps it the implementation of the interface with the awaiter that was generated. Look at this, note the right hand side. – David Pine May 11 '17 at 1:25
  • it doesn't wait without then on result gist.github.com/ipassynk/f562c773c9e0051a7dbc2e2c37baf87b – Julia Passynkova May 13 '17 at 4:29

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