0

I've tinkered around with css variables, finding an interesting application: You can define a --color variable, and use it as value for different attributes based on the class: A button could have its background filled with the --color, while a tab control could use a border-bottom with the --color to highlight the current tab as follows:

:root {
  font: 14px sans-serif;
  --red: #f44;
  --blue: #78f;
  --green: #3c1;
  --color: var(--blue);
}

.blue {
  --color: var(--blue);
}

.red {
  --color: var(--red);
}

.green {
  --color: var(--green);
}

.fillbutton {
  background: var(--color);
  color: #fff;
  padding: 0.25em 1em;
}

.borderbutton {
  background: #fff;
  border: 1px solid var(--color);
  color: var(--color);
  padding: 0.25em 1em;
}

.tab {
  border-bottom: 1px solid #ccc;
  padding: 0 1em;
  line-height: 150%;
}

.tab.current {
  border-bottom: 2px solid var(--color);
  color: var(--color);
  font-weight: bold;
}
<p>
  <span class="fillbutton">Default</span>
  <span class="fillbutton green">Green</span>
  <span class="fillbutton red">Red</span>
  <span class="borderbutton">Default</span>
  <span class="borderbutton green">Green</span>
  <span class="borderbutton red">Red</span>
</p>

<p><span class="tab">Tab1</span><span class="tab current">Tab2</span><span class="tab">Tab3</span></p>

<p><span class="tab red">Tab1</span><span class="tab red current">Tab2</span><span class="tab red">Tab3</span></p>

By defining classes to alter the --color we can easily create different color schemes without having to be specific to the item we want to style: There is only one .red class needed, not separate .red.fillbutton/.red.borderbutton/.red.tab.current

Since css variables are not supported in some browsers I thought I would try to replicate this functionality using a proprocessor like scss, however scss variables seem to be global only and thus cannot mimic this use case. Is there a way that lets me achieve the above behaviour in a similar DRY fashion using scss?

1

Since generating CSS files via SCSS is easy, you can have separate colour variables SCSS files and master 'import' SCSS file (for all other SCSS files you might have). What you do then is you compile separate CSS files for each of the colour variables files (eg you could have 3 website colour themes, so 3 different colour variables SCSS files and then 3 different output files). When a user selects a different theme, you just remember which theme the user selected (cookie) and you load a proper CSS file via JS, instead of hardcoding which CSS file to use.

It's not completely DRY, as you do have to define "master" output SCSS files (these should include import of a proper colour variable SCSS file, which changes for each file, and an import of "master imports" SCSS file, which is always the same) separately for each colour variable (so if you have 3 colour themes, you would have to define 3 files) - although it can probably be done programatically as well. However, that way you can enable multiple colour themes of your website without worrying about current lack of cross browser support of plain CSS variables. As long as you have a predefined list of colour themes, that's probably the way to go.

If you do not have a predefined list of colour themes and want to enable the users to set up their own colour theme with a colour picker (and don't want them to first submit those values and then use those values, server-side, to generate a CSS file out of them and fetch that file to the user), you could make use of 'currentColor' CSS property. It is supported and can serve as a colour variable, although it's far more limiting in regards to capability than the new CSS variables. Basically, via the currentColor you accesses the colour property of parent element. So you could provide classes and styles for the parents (eg. .blue has a blue colour) and then style pretty much everything via currentColour. Then, when a user changes the colour blue to green via a colourpicker or something, you change the colour of .blue to the selected colour via JS. Obviously, you'd have to remember the user's selection and execute the JS function handling that on document ready. This workaround certainly has it's drawbacks (eg. defining colours via parents will mean lots of extra classes / parent elements that wouldn't otherwise be needed for styling), so it's not an exactly quick method either, but it doesn't rely on generating multiple CSS files.

In my opinion, it's best to use SCSS variables and generate multiple CSS files in case you have predefined colour themes. In case you allow the user to completely modify their colour theme, I'd go with submitting those values to server and generating a proper CSS file and then fetching that CSS file to the user. However, following this principle, the CSS file won't be updated as you make changes to your CSS and deploy those changes. So this method has its' drawbacks as well.

Until native CSS variables are properly supported in all relevant browsers, I fear there is no perfect solution.

  • This seems to be a great technique to allow different website "themes" in order to change color schemes for the entire site. However, if you want to style various elements of the same site individually (i.e. some kind of web application which color-codes sections based on their content) this won't work... – Askaga May 10 '17 at 9:42
  • @Askaga, you mean based on user input? If you mean based on something that's controlled by you (as in website developers), then it can be implemented. You just add another or a different class to that section and use a different colour variable for it in your SCSS. Of course, all of the colour variables should appear in all colour variable SCSS files (eg, you can't define $black in 2/3 of the colour variable files only, you have to define it in all, otherwise you'll get an invalid CSS property output) – l.varga May 10 '17 at 9:46
  • Actually my main motivation is having to define the color altering classes (.red, .green, .blue) only once, rather then having to define them n times (once for each class it might be combined with). So I could have multiple sections on a page, each one in a different color scheme. This might be a nice feature to have for App-like pages, i.e. a dashboard where each section and its links, buttons, tabs are color-coded in a different color – Askaga May 10 '17 at 9:56
  • @Askaga I see. To do that, you'd have to write up several rules you might need (eg. a rule for red-border, a rule for blue-border, a rule for green text, a rule for yellow background, etc) and then apply multiple classes to style a section (eg class="red-border blue-text purple-background"). Personally, I define such 'general' classes very rarely and prefer to style each section according to needs, while making use of SCSS variables so that if something needs to be change (eg a different shade of green colour), you only need to do it once and it'll be changed everywhere – l.varga May 10 '17 at 10:08
0

After trying different strategies in scss i found the following solution using mixins. First, we must define all our colors, along with their desired class names, as a list variable:

// define all colors
$colors: (red, #f44), 
         (green, #3c1), 
         (blue, #78f);

// define default color to be blue
$color: nth(nth($colors, 3), 2);

Then we define a mixin colorize which first defines the given attributes with the default $color, then iterates the $colors list, doing the same thing for each color class, using the parent selector:

@mixin colorize($properties...) {

    // for each property assign the default $color
    @each $property in $properties {
        #{$property}: $color;
    }

    // for each color class - assign the class color to each property
    @each $cls, $col in $colors {
        &.#{$cls} { 
            @each $property in $properties {
                #{$property}: $col;
            }
        }
    }
}

Now we can use the colorize-mixin to assign class-specific colors to one or more css properties:

.fillbutton { 
    @include colorize(background); 
    color: #fff; 
    padding: 0.25em 1em; 
}

.borderbutton { 
    @include colorize(border-color, color);
    background: #fff; 
    border: 1px solid; 
    padding: 0.25em 1em; 
}

And finally, use it in our html like this:

<span class="fillbutton green">Green</span>
<span class="fillbutton blue">Blue</span>
<span class="borderbutton">Default</span>
<span class="borderbutton green">Green</span>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.