1

I've recently encountered this problem: when I'm setting the lang= attribute for the <html> tag to ro, all the diacritics on the page are changed to the Cedilla-type characters.

Normal diacritics screenshot(șțȘȚ):

Default diacritics (pic1)

Cedilla-type characters(şţŞŢ)

Cedilla-type diacritics (pic2)

In the source, they are written as normal diacritics (pic1).

Now, the real problem is this:

Google Chrome:

  • <html> -> text is like in pic2 - Cedilla-type diacritics

  • <html lang="ro"> -> again, text is like in pic2 - Cedilla-type diacritics

  • <html lang="en"> -> text is normal, like in pic1

Mozilla Firefox:

  • <html> -> text is normal - pic1

  • <html lang="ro"> -> text is like in pic2 - Cedilla-type diacritics

  • <html lang="en"> -> text is normal, like in pic1

And two demos of the main cases:

h2 {
  font-family: 'Open Sans';
  margin: 0;
}
<html lang="ro">
<head>
    <link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans&subset=latin-ext" rel="stylesheet">
</head>
<body>
    <h2>Diacritics: ș, ț, Ș, Ț</h2>
</body>
</html>

h2 {
  font-family: 'Open Sans';
  margin: 0;
}
<html lang="en">
<head>
    <link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans&subset=latin-ext" rel="stylesheet">
</head>
<body>
    <h2>Diacritics: ș, ț, Ș, Ț</h2>
</body>
</html>

So, is there any way to keep the lang="ro" attribute, but have the normal diacritics(like in pic1)?

Thank you!

** Update, forgot to mention: Romanian diacritics are the normal ones - not the ones with cedilla.

  • 1
    In dev tools I see that Chrome adds -webkit-locale: "ro" to the html element; when I overwrite that with "en" explicitly, it displays as you want. I have no idea however what else this might affect; and I can’t find something comparable in Firefox on a quick glance. – CBroe May 10 '17 at 13:51
  • @CBroe, Wow, didn't see that, thanks a lot. :D It seems to work in Chrome now if i remove lang at all and in CSS I add -webkit-locale: "en". But would that affect the SEO in any way? I mean, the site will be in romanian, when Google will try to index it, won't he take that CSS property and say This is in english!? – artur99 May 10 '17 at 13:57
  • I’d try and leave the lang attribute on the html element in place - especially in regard to search engines. Specifying html { -webkit-locale: "en"; } in your stylesheet somewhere should be enough to overwrite it. And I doubt that takes preference over the language specified in the HTML. – CBroe May 10 '17 at 14:22
  • @CBroe that's great, thank you! :D – artur99 May 10 '17 at 15:00

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