1

Using Retrofit here to consume Google Civic API.

The library requires you to create a model of what the API will return as I have done already with Election. Which is basically a copy of the google documentation.

(Retrofit binds the response properties to properties with the same name)

Election.Java :

public class Election {
private long id;
private String name;
private String electionDay;
private String ocdDivisionId;

public long getId() {
    return id;
}
public void setId(long id) {
    this.id = id;
}
public String getName() {
    return name;
}
public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}
public String getElectionDay() {
    return electionDay;
}
public void setElectionDay(String electionDay) {
    this.electionDay = electionDay;
}
public String getOcdDivisionId() {
    return ocdDivisionId;
}
public void setOcdDivisionId(String ocdDivisionId) {
    this.ocdDivisionId = ocdDivisionId;
}

}

But Representatives have an inconsistent property name, thus I don't see a way to model this in a way Retrofit will know how to deserialize the API's response.

Representatives object (JSON) :

property name is called (key)

How do I let Retrofit deserialize a model that captures the property named variable after a key of the division?

1
0

Assuming you're using a Gson converter, I personally would use a map. I guess the same can be achieved with other converters, but I never used them. Say you have the following object:

public class Division {
    @SerializedName("name")
    @Expose
    private String name;
    @SerializedName("alsoKnownAs")
    @Expose
    private List<String> alsoKnownAs = new ArrayList<>();
    @SerializedName("officeIndices")
    @Expose
    private List<Integer> officeIndices = new ArrayList<>();

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public List<String> getAlsoKnownAs() {
        return alsoKnownAs;
    }

    public void setAlsoKnownAs(List<String> alsoKnownAs) {
        this.alsoKnownAs = alsoKnownAs;
    }

    public List<Integer> getOfficeIndices() {
        return officeIndices;
    }

    public void setOfficeIndices(List<Integer> officeIndices) {
        this.officeIndices = officeIndices;
    }
}

Which represents the object inside the divisions array. You can then have the class:

private class Divisions {
    @SerializedName("divisions")
    @Expose
    private Map<String, Division> divisions = new HashMap<>();
    // ...
}

Notice the usage of a map here? Behind the scenes Gson will be able to serialise and deserialise your objects. The class Divisions is the root of the json you gave us in the question.

Hope this helps

1
  • Never thought I would be happy to see Trump pop up in my App, Geez took way too long, thank you! Using Map in my Division model got everything deserialized.
    – Simulan88
    May 11 '17 at 17:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.