3

How can I print a binary tree in Swift so that the input 79561 prints output like this:

    7
   / \
  5   9
 / \
1   6

I tried to arrange this with some code using For Loops and If Statements but it didn't worked. My code is:

import UIKit

//Variable "node" used only to arrange it in output.
var node = "0"
var space = " "
var linkLeft = "/"
var linkRight = "\\"
var str = "Hello, playground"

var height = 6
var width = height * 2 + 1

print()

//Height
for h in 1...height {
    //Width
    for w in 1...width {
        switch h {
        case 1:
            if(w == width/2 + h) {
                print(node, terminator: "")
            } else {
                print(space, terminator: "")
            }

            if (w == width) {
                print()
            }
        case 2:
            //print(linkLeft, terminator: "")
            if(w == width/3 + h) {
                print(linkLeft, terminator: "")
            } else if(w == width/3 + h + 4) {
                print(linkRight, terminator: "")
            } else {
                print(space, terminator: "")
            }

            if (w == width) {
                print()
            }
        case 3:
            if(w == width/5 + h) {
                print(node, terminator: "")
            } else if(w == width/h + h){
                print(node, terminator: "")
            } else {
                print(space, terminator: "")
            }

            if (w == width) {
                print()
            }
            break
        default:
            break
        }
    }
}

I tried to use two For Loops one for height and other one for width. But it's not working if number of nodes changes. For now I just tried to arrange places of links (/ and \), nodes and spaces, so it's not working. Is there a possible way to do this ?

  • You may adapt the following stackoverflow.com/questions/4965335/… – Jean-Baptiste Yunès May 10 '17 at 17:07
  • @Jean-BaptisteYunès yes but that's in Java, and I'm beginner in both, Java and Swift. So it's hard for me to write it in Swift from Java. – Emm May 10 '17 at 17:08
  • Well well, you need (1) a recursive parsing of the data tree (2) use a distance between nodes that is function of height in the tree, the usual function you can use is a power of 2 (leaves distance 1, parents of leaves 2, parents of parents 4, etc). – Jean-Baptiste Yunès May 10 '17 at 17:13
  • strictly speaking, this is impossible, as the width of the tree increases linearly but the number of nodes you have to draw increases exponentially – taylor swift May 10 '17 at 17:49
11

First you have to define a hierarchical tree structure (class) that allows recursive traversal of the tree nodes. How you implement it doesn't matter as long as it can provide a descriptive string and access to its left and right sub nodes.

For example (I used this for testing purposes):

class TreeNode
{
   var value : Int
   var left  : TreeNode? = nil
   var right : TreeNode? = nil

   init(_ rootValue:Int)
   { value = rootValue }

   @discardableResult
   func addValue( _ newValue:Int) -> TreeNode
   {
      if newValue == value // exclude duplicate entries
      { return self }
      else if newValue < value
      { 
         if let newNode = left?.addValue(newValue)
         { return newNode }
         left = TreeNode(newValue)
         return left!
      }
      else
      {
         if let newNode = right?.addValue(newValue)
         { return newNode }
         right = TreeNode(newValue)
         return right!
      }
   }
}

Then you can create a recursive function to obtain the lines to print. Each line will need to be aware of lower level lines so the list of lines needs to be built from the bottom up. Recursion is an easy way to achieve this kind of interdependency.

Here's an example of a generic function that will work for any binary tree class. It expects a root node and a function (or closure) to access a node's description and left/right sub nodes :

public func treeString<T>(_ node:T, reversed:Bool=false, isTop:Bool=true, using nodeInfo:(T)->(String,T?,T?)) -> String
{
   // node value string and sub nodes
   let (stringValue, leftNode, rightNode) = nodeInfo(node)

   let stringValueWidth  = stringValue.count

   // recurse to sub nodes to obtain line blocks on left and right
   let leftTextBlock     = leftNode  == nil ? []
                         : treeString(leftNode!,reversed:reversed,isTop:false,using:nodeInfo)
                           .components(separatedBy:"\n")

   let rightTextBlock    = rightNode == nil ? []
                         : treeString(rightNode!,reversed:reversed,isTop:false,using:nodeInfo)
                           .components(separatedBy:"\n")

   // count common and maximum number of sub node lines
   let commonLines       = min(leftTextBlock.count,rightTextBlock.count)
   let subLevelLines     = max(rightTextBlock.count,leftTextBlock.count)

   // extend lines on shallower side to get same number of lines on both sides
   let leftSubLines      = leftTextBlock  
                         + Array(repeating:"", count: subLevelLines-leftTextBlock.count)
   let rightSubLines     = rightTextBlock 
                         + Array(repeating:"", count: subLevelLines-rightTextBlock.count)

   // compute location of value or link bar for all left and right sub nodes
   //   * left node's value ends at line's width
   //   * right node's value starts after initial spaces
   let leftLineWidths    = leftSubLines.map{$0.count}                             
   let rightLineIndents  = rightSubLines.map{$0.prefix{$0==" "}.count  } 

   // top line value locations, will be used to determine position of current node & link bars
   let firstLeftWidth    = leftLineWidths.first   ?? 0
   let firstRightIndent  = rightLineIndents.first ?? 0


   // width of sub node link under node value (i.e. with slashes if any)
   // aims to center link bars under the value if value is wide enough
   // 
   // ValueLine:    v     vv    vvvvvv   vvvvv
   // LinkLine:    / \   /  \    /  \     / \ 
   //
   let linkSpacing       = min(stringValueWidth, 2 - stringValueWidth % 2)
   let leftLinkBar       = leftNode  == nil ? 0 : 1
   let rightLinkBar      = rightNode == nil ? 0 : 1
   let minLinkWidth      = leftLinkBar + linkSpacing + rightLinkBar
   let valueOffset       = (stringValueWidth - linkSpacing) / 2

   // find optimal position for right side top node
   //   * must allow room for link bars above and between left and right top nodes
   //   * must not overlap lower level nodes on any given line (allow gap of minSpacing)
   //   * can be offset to the left if lower subNodes of right node 
   //     have no overlap with subNodes of left node                                                                                                                                 
   let minSpacing        = 2
   let rightNodePosition = zip(leftLineWidths,rightLineIndents[0..<commonLines])
                           .reduce(firstLeftWidth + minLinkWidth)
                           { max($0, $1.0 + minSpacing + firstRightIndent - $1.1) }


   // extend basic link bars (slashes) with underlines to reach left and right
   // top nodes.  
   //
   //        vvvvv
   //       __/ \__
   //      L       R
   //
   let linkExtraWidth    = max(0, rightNodePosition - firstLeftWidth - minLinkWidth )
   let rightLinkExtra    = linkExtraWidth / 2
   let leftLinkExtra     = linkExtraWidth - rightLinkExtra

   // build value line taking into account left indent and link bar extension (on left side)
   let valueIndent       = max(0, firstLeftWidth + leftLinkExtra + leftLinkBar - valueOffset)
   let valueLine         = String(repeating:" ", count:max(0,valueIndent)) 
                         + stringValue
   let slash             = reversed ? "\\" : "/"
   let backSlash         = reversed ? "/"  : "\\"
   let uLine             = reversed ? "¯"  : "_"
   // build left side of link line
   let leftLink          = leftNode == nil ? "" 
                         : String(repeating: " ", count:firstLeftWidth)
                         + String(repeating: uLine, count:leftLinkExtra)
                         + slash

   // build right side of link line (includes blank spaces under top node value) 
   let rightLinkOffset   = linkSpacing + valueOffset * (1 - leftLinkBar)                      
   let rightLink         = rightNode == nil ? ""
                         : String(repeating:  " ", count:rightLinkOffset)
                         + backSlash 
                         + String(repeating:  uLine, count:rightLinkExtra)

   // full link line (will be empty if there are no sub nodes)                                                                                                    
   let linkLine          = leftLink + rightLink

   // will need to offset left side lines if right side sub nodes extend beyond left margin
   // can happen if left subtree is shorter (in height) than right side subtree                                                
   let leftIndentWidth   = max(0,firstRightIndent - rightNodePosition) 
   let leftIndent        = String(repeating:" ", count:leftIndentWidth)
   let indentedLeftLines = leftSubLines.map{ $0.isEmpty ? $0 : (leftIndent + $0) }

   // compute distance between left and right sublines based on their value position
   // can be negative if leading spaces need to be removed from right side
   let mergeOffsets      = indentedLeftLines
                           .map{$0.count}
                           .map{leftIndentWidth + rightNodePosition - firstRightIndent - $0 }
                           .enumerated()
                           .map{ rightSubLines[$0].isEmpty ? 0  : $1 }


   // combine left and right lines using computed offsets
   //   * indented left sub lines
   //   * spaces between left and right lines
   //   * right sub line with extra leading blanks removed.
   let mergedSubLines    = zip(mergeOffsets.enumerated(),indentedLeftLines)
                           .map{ ( $0.0, $0.1, $1 + String(repeating:" ", count:max(0,$0.1)) ) }
                           .map{ $2 + String(rightSubLines[$0].dropFirst(max(0,-$1))) }

   // Assemble final result combining
   //  * node value string
   //  * link line (if any)
   //  * merged lines from left and right sub trees (if any)
   let treeLines = [leftIndent + valueLine]
                 + (linkLine.isEmpty ? [] : [leftIndent + linkLine])
                 + mergedSubLines

   return (reversed && isTop ? treeLines.reversed(): treeLines)
          .joined(separator:"\n")                                        
}

To actually print, you'll need to supply the function with your class's node and a closure to access node descriptions and the left and right sub nodes.

extension TreeNode
{       
   var asString:String { return treeString(self){("\($0.value)",$0.left,$0.right)}  }       
}

var root = TreeNode(7)

root.addValue(9)
root.addValue(5)
root.addValue(6)
root.addValue(1)

print(root.asString)

//     7
//    / \
//   5   9
//  / \
// 1   6
//

root = TreeNode(80)

root.addValue(50)
root.addValue(90)
root.addValue(10)
root.addValue(60)
root.addValue(30)
root.addValue(70)
root.addValue(55)
root.addValue(5)
root.addValue(35)
root.addValue(85)

print(root.asString)

//              80
//          ___/  \___
//        50          90
//     __/  \__      /
//   10        60  85
//  /  \      /  \
// 5    30  55    70
//        \
//         35
//

[EDIT] Improved logic to use less space on trees with deeper right side than left. Cleaned up code and added comments to explain how it works.

//
//       12
//      /  \
//    10    50
//   /   __/  \__
//  5  30        90
//       \      /
//        35  70
//           /  \
//         60    85
//        /
//      55
//

//                12
//               /  \
//             10    30
//            /        \
//           5          90
//                     /
//                   85
//                  /
//                70
//               /
//             55
//            /
//          48
//         /
//       45
//      /
//    40
//   /
// 35
//

[EDIT2] made the function generic and adapted explanations.

With the generic function, the data doesn't even need to be in an actual tree structure.

For example, you could print an array containing a heap tree:

 extension Array
 {    
    func printHeapTree(reversed:Bool = false)
    {
       let tree = treeString( 0, reversed:reversed )
       {
          let left  = { $0 < self.count ? $0 : nil}($0 * 2 + 1)
          let right = { $0 < self.count ? $0 : nil}($0 * 2 + 2)
          return ( "\(self[$0])", left, right )
       }
       print(tree) 
    }
 }

let values = [7,5,9,1,6]
values.printHeapTree()

//     7
//    / \
//   5   9
//  / \
// 1   6

let family = [ "Me","Paul","Rosa","Vincent","Jody","John","Kate"]
family.printHeapTree()

//                Me
//            ___/  \___
//        Paul          Rosa
//        /  \          /  \
// Vincent    Jody  John    Kate

But for that last example, a family tree is usually presented upside down. So, I adjusted the function to allow printing a reversed tree:

family.printHeapTree(reversed:true)

// Vincent    Jody  John    Kate
//        \  /          \  /
//        Paul          Rosa
//            ¯¯¯\  /¯¯¯
//                Me

[EDIT3] Added condition to exclude duplicate entries from tree in example class (TreeNode) per Emm's request

[EDIT4] changed formula for mergedSubLines so that it will compile in an actual project (was testing this in the playground).

[EDIT5] minor adjustments for Swift4, added ability to print a reversed tree, changed Array example to a heap tree.

  • In this code, if we add two or more same values, values will repeat on tree. So this is wrong and this doesn't happen in Binary Search Tree. – Emm May 30 '17 at 11:44
  • The OP seemed concerned with printing a binary tree structure. The sample class itself can be adjusted to requirements as needed (e.g. add a validation to not add anything if an existing value is provided, and return the existing node instead) – Alain T. May 30 '17 at 11:56
  • Yes I edited answer but you didn't approve it. But it's a little bit confusing with array. – Emm May 30 '17 at 12:30
  • Added the "no duplicate" condition to the example class. The Array example is to illustrate the flexibility of the generic function. I wrote that for the benefit of other people that may find this question (and answer) and could have different requirements in their data structures. – Alain T. May 30 '17 at 15:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.