29

I have to assign a random amount of objects in this program, and currently the only way I know to do this is something like this:

    if (star.returnZones() == 1) {
        this.createPlanet(planet1, star);
    }
    else if (star.returnZones() == 2) {
        this.createPlanet(planet1, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet2, star);
    }
    else if (star.returnZones() == 3) {
        this.createPlanet(planet1, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet2, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet3, star);
    }
    else if (star.returnZones() == 4) {
        this.createPlanet(planet1, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet2, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet3, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet4, star);
    }
    else if (star.returnZones() == 5) {
        this.createPlanet(planet1, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet2, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet3, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet4, star);
        this.createPlanet(planet5, star);
    }

I am sure this is a far more efficent way to do this, where each one does something along the lines of this. I will be using the term asAbovePlus to mean everything above, plus one more thing.

if (star.returnZones() == 1) {
    this.createPlanet(planet1, star);
}
else if (star.returnZones() == 2) {
    asAbovePlus
    this.createPlanet(planet2, star);
}

Is there a way to do something like this in Java? It would really help out.

  • 3
    you can, for example, ditch the else and use >= instead of ==. That would compound your blocks. Or, you can put your planets in a list, and interate on them using the numer of zones as a loop size. – njzk2 May 10 '17 at 19:57
91

Start by removing the duplicates:

int zones = star.returnZones();
if (zones >= 1) {
    createPlanet(planet1, star);
}
if (zones >= 2) {
    createPlanet(planet2, star);
}
...

You can see that in the example where zones == 2, it does execute the 2 blocks, so you keep the same functionality.

Then, you can see that this is actually a loop. Start by putting the planets in an array:

Planet[] planets = new Planet[] {planet1, planet2, ...};
for (int i = 0; i < star.returnZones(); i++) {
    createPlanet(planets[i], star);
}
  • 1
    Argh, this answer was posted 4 minutes after mine, but it gets double points due to the variable declarations. :p – user000001 May 11 '17 at 14:01
  • 8
    @user000001 Have an upvote buddy. njzk2 wrote the code but also explained why by showing the transformation between the initial implementation and the final result. Short, simple, to the point... but most importantly it is enlightening. – sten May 11 '17 at 16:26
  • 1
    I'm still somewhat new to Java, but in your loop, could you potentially walk off the end of the array? Would it be wiser to change that to an ArrayList and just add a new planet to the end of the list during each iteration of the loop? – GnoveltyGnome May 12 '17 at 15:28
  • @GnoveltyGnome yes, you totally could. – njzk2 May 12 '17 at 17:41
46

Add the planet objects to an array, and then you can write:

Planet[] planets = {planet1, planet2, planet3, planet4, planet5};

for (int i = 0; i < star.returnZones(); i++) {
    this.createPlanet(planets[i], star);
}
44

One way to do it, is a switch statement with fall-through behavior:

switch (star.returnZones()) {
    case 5: this.createPlanet(planet5, star); // fall-through
    case 4: this.createPlanet(planet4, star); // fall-through
    case 3: this.createPlanet(planet3, star); // fall-through
    case 2: this.createPlanet(planet2, star); // fall-through
    case 1: this.createPlanet(planet1, star); // fall-through
}

Since the fall-through behavior is achieved by the absence of a break statement, it is strongly recommended to add clarifying comments, like shown above, so that a reader immediately understands that the missing break statements are intentional.

A disadvantage is that it will create the planets in the opposite order.

An alternative is a loop:

Planet[] planet={ planet1, planet2, planet3, planet4, planet5 };
int number = star.returnZones();
if(number>0 && number<=5) {
    for(int pIndex=0; pIndex<number; pIndex++)
        this.createPlanet(planet[pIndex], star);
}

Note that in either case, you should think about what should happen with values outside the range. If you assume that this will never happen, you should add a code which will throw an error, if the assumption is violated, to ensure that inconsistent or corrupted data is immediately detected instead of continuing with what user might report as “strange behavior” (without having a clue about the real source of the problem), e.g.

switch (star.returnZones()) {
    default: throw new AssertionError("returnZones should be 1..5");
    case 5: this.createPlanet(planet5, star); // fall-through
    case 4: this.createPlanet(planet4, star); // fall-through
    case 3: this.createPlanet(planet3, star); // fall-through
    case 2: this.createPlanet(planet2, star); // fall-through
    case 1: this.createPlanet(planet1, star); // fall-through
}

or

Planet[] planet={ planet1, planet2, planet3, planet4, planet5 };
int number = star.returnZones();
if(number>0 && number<=5) {
    for(int pIndex=0; pIndex<number; pIndex++)
        this.createPlanet(planet[pIndex], star);
}
else throw new AssertionError("returnZones should be 1..5");
  • 17
    +1. Although a loop is probably what the OP should use, a switch statement is the best answer to the literal question. – JollyJoker May 11 '17 at 8:49
  • 6
    +1 "Since the fall-through behavior is achieved by the absence of a break statement, it is strongly recommended to add clarifying comments, like shown above, so that a reader immediately understands that the missing break statements are intentional." – pulp_fiction May 11 '17 at 16:52
10

There is another solution similar to the first part of the answer of @njzk2: It is switch/case with fall through:

int zones = star.returnZones();
switch (zones ) {
 case 5:
    createPlanet(planet5, star);
 case 4:
    createPlanet(planet4, star);
 case 3:
    createPlanet(planet3, star);
 case 2:
    createPlanet(planet2, star);
 default:
    createPlanet(planet1, star);   
}
  • 15
    This will create 1 planet for #zones <1 and >5. – NickL May 10 '17 at 22:08
  • Should add case for zone 1 probably empty default case. – TheRealChx101 May 12 '17 at 16:06
  • 1
    @GhostCat Thanks so much, but I only copied it from the liked website... ;o) – Timothy Truckle Jul 15 '18 at 18:37
10

The other answers are correct that repetitive work like this can be handled neatly with a loop.

With Java 8 there is an another, arguably even neater, option - using the Stream API to declare the repetitive work in a functional style. You can get the entire thing done in a one-liner.

Arrays.asList(planet1, planet2, planet3 /*...etc*/)
  .stream()
  .limit(star.returnZones())
  .forEach((planet) -> this.createPlanet(planet, star));

Note that the first 3 lines there are just for illustration of setup of the stream of length n planets - this can and should be done dynamically by another method, rather than being statically defined like that, to simplify further.

  • 2
    +1 for original, modern, yet scalable as much as the other options involving loops. Moreover, this different syntax will maybe help OP to understand other languages syntax (like JavaScript) – Pac0 May 12 '17 at 5:07
  • You don’t need the List detour. You can directly use Stream.of(planet1, planet2, planet3 /*...etc*/) instead of Arrays.asList(planet1, planet2, planet3 /*...etc*/) .stream() – Holger Sep 28 '17 at 9:52
10

You can alternatively have a static method taking varags called createPlanets(PlanetCreator creator, Star star, Planet...planets).

And then all you will have to do is pass your planets as an array or separated by commas (still array ultimately) and loop through them:

public static void createPlanets(PlanetCreator creator, Star star, Planet...planets) {
    for (Planet p: planets) {
        creator.createPlanet(p, star);
    }
}
8

The problem statement sometimes itself guides for the solution. In your case you need to repeat similar task. For each task there is a different planet but again it follows an order. Such problem can be solved easily by looping.

A simple solution can be putting the objects planet1, planet2,...planet3 in an ArrayList. Then using a for loop iterating for star.returnZones() times and invoking createPlanet in each iteration, passing the ith item from the array list for the ith iteration.

7

Just a slight variation on the arrays answer:

List<Planet> planets = Arrays.asList(planet1, planet2, planet3 /*etc*/);
for (Planet p : planets.subList(0, start.returnZones()) {
  createPlanet(p, star);
}

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