107

If all the items in a list have the same value, then I need to use that value, otherwise I need to use an “otherValue”. I can’t think of a simple and clear way of doing this.

See also Neat way to write loop that has special logic for the first item in a collection.

  • On your rather cheeky attention getter, I'd go with Ani's answer stackoverflow.com/questions/4390232/… – Binary Worrier Dec 8 '10 at 17:41
  • 5
    What do you want to happen if there is no first value because the list is empty? In that case it is true that "all the items in the list have the same value" - if you don't believe me, find me one that doesn't! You don't define what to do in this situation. Should this throw an exception, return the "other" value, or what? – Eric Lippert Dec 8 '10 at 18:11
  • @Eric, sorry when the list is empty it should return the "other" value – Ian Ringrose Dec 8 '10 at 21:28
137
var val = yyy.First().Value;
return yyy.All(x=>x.Value == val) ? val : otherValue; 

Cleanest way I can think of. You can make it a one-liner by inlining val, but First() would be evaluated n times, doubling execution time.

To incorporate the "empty set" behavior specified in the comments, you simply add one more line before the two above:

if(yyy == null || !yyy.Any()) return otherValue;
  • +1, would using .Any allow for the enumeration to quit early in cases where there are different values? – Jeff Ogata Dec 8 '10 at 18:01
  • 11
    @adrift: All will terminate as soon as it hits an element x of the sequence for which x.Value != val. Similarly, Any(x => x.Value != val) would terminate as soon as it hits an element x of the sequence for which x.Value != val. That is, both All and Any exhibit "short-circuiting" analogous to && and || (which is effectively what All and Any are). – jason Dec 8 '10 at 18:06
  • @Jason: exactly. All(condition) is effectively !Any(!condition), and the evaluation of either will terminate as soon as the answer is known. – KeithS Dec 8 '10 at 18:10
  • 1
    Microoptimisation: return yyy.Skip(1).All(x=>x.Value == val) ? val : otherValue; – Caltor Dec 13 '18 at 13:20
84

Good quick test for all equal:

collection.Distinct().Count() == 1
  • can it work with arrays – AMH Jun 30 '11 at 13:16
  • 1
    This won't work with just any Class, though it should work with structs. Great for a list of primitives, though. – Andrew Backer Jul 22 '13 at 5:52
  • 2
    +1 much cleaner than KeithS' solution IMO. You might want to use collection.Distinct().Count() <= 1 if you want to allow empty collections. – 3dGrabber Dec 30 '13 at 12:44
  • 2
    Be careful, .Distinct() does not always work as expected - especially when you work with objects, see this question. In that cases, you need to implement the IEquatable interface. – Matt May 14 '14 at 14:46
  • 13
    Cleaner, yes, but less performant in the average case; Distinct() is guaranteed to traverse every single element in the collection once, and in the worst case of every element being different, Count() will traverse the full list twice. Distinct() also creates a HashSet so its behavior can be linear and not NlogN or worse, and that will inflate memory usage. All() makes one full pass in the worst case of all elements being equal, and doesn't create any new collections. – KeithS Aug 26 '14 at 21:11
20

Though you certainly can build such a device out of existing sequence operators, I would in this case be inclined to write this one up as a custom sequence operator. Something like:

// Returns "other" if the list is empty.
// Returns "other" if the list is non-empty and there are two different elements.
// Returns the element of the list if it is non-empty and all elements are the same.
public static int Unanimous(this IEnumerable<int> sequence, int other)
{
    int? first = null;
    foreach(var item in sequence)
    {
        if (first == null)
            first = item;
        else if (first.Value != item)
            return other;
    }
    return first ?? other;
}

That's pretty clear, short, covers all the cases, and does not unnecessarily create extra iterations of the sequence.

Making this into a generic method that works on IEnumerable<T> is left as an exercise. :-)

  • Say, for example, you have a sequence of nullables and the extracted value is also a nullable. In which case, the sequence could be empty or every item in the sequence could have a null in the extracted value. Coalescing, in this case, would return the other when the null was actually the (presumably) correct response. Say the function was T Unanimous<U, T>(this IEnumerable<U> sequence, T other) or some such signature, that complicates it a bit. – Anthony Pegram Dec 8 '10 at 18:38
  • And I see you left it as an exercise. Good show. – Anthony Pegram Dec 8 '10 at 18:39
  • @Anthony: Indeed, there are many complications here, but they are pretty easily worked around. I'm using a nullable int as a convenience so that I don't have to declare a "I've seen the first item already" flag. You could easily just declare the flag. Also I'm using "int" instead of T because I know that you can always compare two ints for equality, which is not the case for two Ts. This is more of a sketch of a solution than a fully functional generic solution. – Eric Lippert Dec 8 '10 at 18:41
12
return collection.All(i => i == collection.First())) 
    ? collection.First() : otherValue;.

Or if you're worried about executing First() for each element (which could be a valid performance concern):

var first = collection.First();
return collection.All(i => i == first) ? first : otherValue;
  • @KeithS - Which is why I added the second part of my answer. On small collections, calling First() is trivial. On large collections, that might start to be an issue. – Justin Niessner Dec 8 '10 at 17:42
  • 1
    "On small collections, calling First() is trivial." - That depends on the source of the collection. For a list or array of simple objects, you're absolutely right. But, some enumerables are not finite memory-cached sets of primitives. A collection of delegates, or an enumerator that yields through an algorithmic series calculation (e.g. Fibonacci), would get very expensive to evaluate First() on every time. – KeithS Dec 8 '10 at 17:57
  • @KeithS - Very true. – Justin Niessner Dec 8 '10 at 17:58
  • 4
    Or worse, if the query is a database query and calling "First" hits the database again every time. – Eric Lippert Dec 8 '10 at 18:14
  • 1
    It gets worse when you have one-time iteration like reading from file... So Ani's answer from other thread looks the best. – Alexei Levenkov Dec 8 '10 at 18:20
3

This may be late, but an extension that works for value and reference types alike based on Eric's answer:

public static partial class Extensions
{
    public static Nullable<T> Unanimous<T>(this IEnumerable<Nullable<T>> sequence, Nullable<T> other, IEqualityComparer comparer = null)  where T : struct, IComparable
    {
        object first = null;
        foreach(var item in sequence)
        {
            if (first == null)
                first = item;
            else if (comparer != null && !comparer.Equals(first, item))
                return other;
            else if (!first.Equals(item))
                return other;
        }
        return (Nullable<T>)first ?? other;
    }

    public static T Unanimous<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, T other, IEqualityComparer comparer = null)  where T : class, IComparable
    {
        object first = null;
        foreach(var item in sequence)
        {
            if (first == null)
                first = item;
            else if (comparer != null && !comparer.Equals(first, item))
                return other;
            else if (!first.Equals(item))
                return other;
        }
        return (T)first ?? other;
    }
}
1
public int GetResult(List<int> list){
int first = list.First();
return list.All(x => x == first) ? first : SOME_OTHER_VALUE;
}
1

An alternative to using LINQ:

var set = new HashSet<int>(values);
return (1 == set.Count) ? values.First() : otherValue;

I have found using HashSet<T> is quicker for lists of up to ~ 6,000 integers compared with:

var value1 = items.First();
return values.All(v => v == value1) ? value1: otherValue;
  • Firstly this may create lots of garbage. Also it is less clear then the other LINQ answers, but slower then the extension method answers. – Ian Ringrose Feb 3 '15 at 14:53
  • True. However, the won't be much garbage if we are talking about determining whether a small set of values are all the same. When I ran this and a LINQ statement in LINQPad for a small set of values, HashSet was quicker (timed using Stopwatch class). – Ɖiamond ǤeezeƦ Feb 3 '15 at 18:09
  • If you run it in a release build from the command line you will may get different results. – Ian Ringrose Feb 3 '15 at 22:39
  • Created a console application and find that HashSet<T> is initially quicker than using the LINQ statements in my answer. However, if I do this in a loop, then LINQ is quicker. – Ɖiamond ǤeezeƦ Mar 25 '15 at 18:30
  • The big issue with this solution is that if you're using your custom classes, you have to implement your own GetHashCode(), which is difficult to do correctly See: stackoverflow.com/a/371348/2607840 for more details. – Cameron Nov 10 '16 at 14:59
1

A slight variation on the above simplified approach.

var result = yyy.Distinct().Count() == yyy.Count();

  • 2
    This is exactly the other way round. This will check that every element in the list is Unique. – Mario Galea May 9 '18 at 9:53
-1

If a array is of type multidimension like below then we have to write below linq to check the data.

example: here elements are 0 and i am checking all values are 0 or not.
ip1=
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

    var value=ip1[0][0];  //got the first index value
    var equalValue = ip1.Any(x=>x.Any(xy=>xy.Equals()));  //check with all elements value 
    if(equalValue)//returns true or false  
    {  
    return "Same Numbers";  
    }else{  
    return "Different Numbers";   
    }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.