1

Supposing I wanted to remove the list elements mentioning the animals in the banned-from-house collection:

(def list (atom [{:animal "a quick happy brown fox that rocks!"}
                 {:animal "a quick happy brown hamster that rocks!"}
                 {:animal "a quick happy brown bird that rocks!"}
                 {:animal "a quick happy brown dog and fox that rock!"}
                 {:animal "a quick happy brown fish that rocks!"}]))

(def banned-from-house (atom ["fox" "bird"]))

What would be the most idiomatic way to go about that?

Also, what would be a better title for this question? (I struggle in discussing clojure code)

7

Let's build this step by step.

First, let's test if a String mentions some animal name, using clojure.string/includes?.

(defn mentions-animal? [s animal]
  (clojure.string/includes? s animal))

(mentions-animal?
  "a quick happy brown fox that rocks!"
  "fox")
=> true
(mentions-animal?
  "a quick happy brown fox that rocks!"
  "dog")
=> false 

Second, let's test if a string mentions some of a seq of animal names, using clojure.core/some.

(defn mentions-any? [s animals]
  (some #(mentions-animal? s %) animals))

(mentions-any?
  "a quick happy brown fox that rocks!"
  #{"fox" "dog"})
=> true
(mentions-any?
  "a quick happy brown fox that rocks!"
  #{"cat" "dog"})
=> nil

Next, extend this logic to animal maps instead of strings.

(defn animal-mentions-any? 
  [a animals]
  (mentions-any? (:animal a) animals))

Finally, implement the filtering logic using clojure.core/remove:

(defn remove-banned-animals 
  [animals-list banned-animals]
  (remove #(animal-mentions-any? % banned-animals) animals-list))

(remove-banned-animals
  [{:animal "a quick happy brown fox that rocks!"}
   {:animal "a quick happy brown hamster that rocks!"}
   {:animal "a quick happy brown bird that rocks!"}
   {:animal "a quick happy brown dog and fox that rock!"}
   {:animal "a quick happy brown fish that rocks!"}]
  ["fox" "bird"])
=> ({:animal "a quick happy brown hamster that rocks!"} {:animal "a quick happy brown fish that rocks!"})
  • This is awesome! Thanks so much. I was a bit stumped about how to do it with this brevity as I didn't know about 'includes?'. The step-wise explanation is also great. – THX1137 May 11 '17 at 18:58
  • just one note: since we want to classify data by some word inclusion, it is probably better to use regexp instead of includes? , (something like #"\bfox\b"), to avoid problems with words, including your target ones (like "a quick happy brown dog dancing foxtrot") – leetwinski May 12 '17 at 8:10
  • 1
    @leetwinski I agree, but even regexps have shortcomings (pluralization etc.), in which case the solution would be to use an NLP library. It seemed to me the focus of the question was code organization, which is why I opted for a simplistic solution. – Valentin Waeselynck May 12 '17 at 8:59

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