9

I'm designing a function that will convert a string into a float. e.g. "45.5" = 45.5

I have this so far. But it doesn't seem to work. Keep in mind, we cannot use any C library functions like atoi, atof or even pow for that matter.

int str2float( char *s )
{
    int num = 0;
    int dec = 0;
    double i = 1.0;
    int ten = 1;
    /***** ADD YOUR CODE HERE *****/

    for(; *s != '\0'; s++)
    {
        if (*s == '.'){
            for(; *s != '\0'; s++){
                dec = (dec * CONT) + (*s - '0');
                i++;
            }
        }else{
            num = (num * CONT) + (*s - '0');
        }

    }
    for(;i!=0;i--){
        ten *= 10;
    }
    dec = dec / (ten);
    printf("%d", dec);
    num += dec;
    return num;  
}
9
  • 17
    I'm wondering why your str2float returns an integer!
    – Pirooz
    Commented Dec 8, 2010 at 21:53
  • 1
    And I suggest you step through it in the debugger. IMO it's even better than printf.
    – detunized
    Commented Dec 8, 2010 at 21:53
  • 5
    If homework can be done on behalf of students by rep-hunters on SO, what value does a degree have these days? Commented Dec 8, 2010 at 23:15
  • 1
    This is actually a very hard problem. It's easy to write a solution that works for values near 1, but handling extremely large and extremely small numbers correctly is a task only floating point experts or mathematicians should attempt... Commented Dec 9, 2010 at 1:19
  • 1
    @David Heffernan: There is a saying: The more they cheat, the better we'll be paid.
    – ruslik
    Commented Dec 9, 2010 at 11:37

11 Answers 11

22

Here is my try:

float stof(const char* s){
  float rez = 0, fact = 1;
  if (*s == '-'){
    s++;
    fact = -1;
  };
  for (int point_seen = 0; *s; s++){
    if (*s == '.'){
      point_seen = 1; 
      continue;
    };
    int d = *s - '0';
    if (d >= 0 && d <= 9){
      if (point_seen) fact /= 10.0f;
      rez = rez * 10.0f + (float)d;
    };
  };
  return rez * fact;
};
3
  • Thanks, that works. I had to make the decimal places to 4 for it display the correct output. Thanks again. Commented Dec 8, 2010 at 22:10
  • @user When I run it, the output is 24.5.
    – ruslik
    Commented Dec 10, 2010 at 10:52
  • Yes, your right! My mistake, I had a temporary var which was an int and not a double which was causing the mix up. Commented Dec 10, 2010 at 11:00
3

One potential issue is that s is incremented by the outer loop before checking that it isn't pointing to the NULL terminator.

for(; *s != '\0'; s++)
{
        ...
        for(; *s != '\0'; s++){
        ...
        }
        // inner loop is done now since we have *s=='\0' ...
    ...
    // ... but now we're going to increment s again at the end of the outer loop!
}

You need to exit both the inner and outer loop immediately after the NULL terminator is spotted.

1

This is my solution for atof function.

#include<stdio.h>
float my_a2f(char *);

main() {
  char ch[20];
  float i;
  printf("\n enter the number as a string\n");
  scanf("%[^\n]", ch);
  i = my_a2f(ch);
  printf(" string =%s , float =%g \n", ch, i);
}

float my_a2f(char *p) {
  // here i took another two   variables for counting the number of digits in mantissa
  int i, num = 0, num2 = 0, pnt_seen = 0, x = 0, y = 1; 
  float f1, f2, f3;
  for (i = 0; p[i]; i++)
    if (p[i] == '.') {
      pnt_seen = i;
      break;
    }
  for (i = 0; p[i]; i++) {
    if (i < pnt_seen) num = num * 10 + (p[i] - 48);
    else if (i == pnt_seen) continue;
    else {
      num2 = num2 * 10 + (p[i] - 48);
      ++x;
    }
  }
  // it takes 10 if it has 1 digit ,100 if it has 2 digits in mantissa
  for (i = 1; i <= x; i++) 
    y = y * 10;
  f2 = num2 / (float) y;
  f3 = num + f2;
  return f3;
}
3
  • 1
    OP's sample "45.5" comes up with "float =45.15" here. Suggest review. Commented Aug 10, 2016 at 18:58
  • thanks chux ,yes, if we count the number of digits in num2 and divide according to it . then it will work in most of the cases, i will update my answer . please check if it works. Commented Aug 12, 2016 at 3:38
  • Better to use float num, num2, y to avoid overflow. Better to use '0' than 48. f1 not used. Commented Aug 12, 2016 at 4:08
0

something like this should do it:

float str2float(char* s){
// solve for special cases where s begins with 0's or nun numeric values, or if s is NULL
  float result = 0;
  int decimalCount = 0, i = 0, decimalPointLoc = strlen(s);
  for (; s[i] != '\0'; i++){
    if (s[i] == '.') decimalPointLoc = i;
    if (i < decimalPointLoc) { result *= 10; result += (int)(s[i] + '0'); }
    else { result += (float)(s[i] + '0')/(pow(i-decimalPointLoc,10)); }
  }
  return result;
}

The code might not be very clean and not necessarily the best way to do it, but you get the idea. pow(x,y) returns x^y and requires math.h and strlen(s) returns size of s and requires string.h.

3
  • sorry I can't use strlen. No C library functions. Commented Dec 8, 2010 at 22:12
  • @user373466: you can implement your own strlen function.. Its a matter of 3 lines.. :) Commented Jan 3, 2013 at 6:53
  • Or you can set decimalPointLoc initially to 1000 and skip strlen altogether. Edit: ooh, it's adding '0' instead of subtracting, so might assuming it's not tested at all. pow arguments are swapped too.
    – wqw
    Commented Mar 27, 2018 at 10:39
0
double Myatof(char str[]){

int len=0, n=0,i=0;
float f=1.0,val=0.0;

//counting length of String
while(str[len])len++;
//cheking for valid string
if(!len)return 0;

//Extracting Integer  part
while(i<len && str[i]!='.')
    n=10*n +(str[i++]-'0');

//checking if only Integer 
if(i==len) return n;
i++;
while(i<len)
{
    f*=0.1;
    val+=f*(str[i++]-'0');
    }
    return(val+n);
}
0
#define ZERO 48
#define NINE 57
#define MINUS 45
#define DECPNT 46

int strtoint_n(char* str, int n)
{
    int sign = 1;
    int place = 1;
    int ret = 0;

    int i;
    for (i = n-1; i >= 0; i--, place *= 10)
    {
        int c = str[i];
        switch (c)
        {
            case MINUS:
                if (i == 0) sign = -1;
                else return -1;
                break;
            default:
                if (c >= ZERO && c <= NINE) ret += (c - ZERO) * place;
                else return -1;
        }
    }

    return sign * ret;
}

float _float_fraction(char* str, int n)
{
    float place = 0.1f;
    float ret = 0.0f;

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++, place /= 10)
    {
        int c = str[i];
        ret += (c - ZERO) * place;
    }
    return ret;
}
float strtoflt(char* str)
{
    int n = 0;
    int sign = 1;
    int d = -1;
    int ret = 0;

    char* temp = str;
    while (*temp != '\0')
    {
        switch (*temp)
        {
            case MINUS:
                if (n == 0) sign = -1;
                else return -1;
                break;
            case DECPNT:
                if (d == -1) d = n;
                else return -1;
                break;
            default:
                if (*temp < ZERO && *temp > NINE) return -1;
        }
        n++;
        temp++;
    }

    if (d == -1)
    {
        return (float)(strtoint_n(str, n));
    }
    else if (d == 0)
    {
        return _float_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1));
    }
    else if (sign == -1 && d == 1)
    {
        return (-1)*_float_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1));
    }
    else if (sign == -1)
    {
        ret = strtoint_n(str+1, d-1);
        return (-1) * (ret + _float_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1)));
    }
    else
    {
        ret = strtoint_n(str, d);
        return ret + _float_fraction((str+d+1), (n-d-1));
    }
}
1
  • 2
    If someone wants to know the answer, he has to access your blog. From your blog you provide a link to SkyDrive. From there an you have to download a zip file and extract it to get the solution. Isnt that a bit too complicated? Include the source in your answer!! Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference.
    – Manuel
    Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 11:54
0

I think my solution is more robust.

Feel free to challenge my code. Here is the link: https://github.com/loverszhaokai/Demo/blob/master/str_to_float/src/str_to_float.cc

Following is the code:

#include <climits>
#include <cmath>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int last_err_code = 0;
// last_err_code = 0 when there is no error
//
// last_err_code = 1 when there is invalid characters, the valid characters
//                   are 0~9, '.', '+-'
//
// last_err_code = 2 when there is no integer before '.' or there is no integer
//                   after '.'
//                   e.g. ".123", "123.", "."
//
// last_err_code = 3 when there is more than one '.'
//                   e.g. "123..456", "123.4.56"
//
// last_err_code = 4 when the integer is bigger than FLOAT_MAX
//                   e.g. "1111111111111111111111111111111111111.23"
//

// Clear the left and right whitespace
// e.g. "  123 456  " -> "123 456"
char *trim(char *str)
{
    while (*str == ' ' || *str == '\t')
        str++;

    char *start = str;

    if (!(*str))
        return str;

    char *end = str;

    while (*str) {
        if (*str != ' ' && *str != '\t')
            end = str;
        str++;
    }

    *(end + 1) = 0;

    return start;
}

// String to Float
float str_to_float(const char *pstr)
{
    char *pstr_copy, *str;
    // The sign of float, set -1 when the first character is '-'
    int sign = 1;
    // The value of integers
    long long integer = 0;
    // The value of decimals
    double decimal = 0;
    // The multiple of next decimal
    double dec_num = 0.1;
    // Has found dot '.'
    bool has_dot = 0;
    // Has integer
    bool has_integer = 0;

    if (pstr == NULL)
        return 0;

    pstr_copy = strdup(pstr);
    str = trim(pstr_copy);

    if (!(*str)) {
        // "   "
        return 0;
    }

    if (*str == '+' || *str == '-') {
        if (*str == '-')
            sign = -1;
        str++;
    }

    while (*str) {

        if (*str >= '0' && *str <= '9') {

            if (!has_dot) {
                // "123"
                if (!has_integer)
                    has_integer = 1;

                integer *= 10;
                integer += *str - '0';

                if (integer > (long long)INT_MAX) {
                    // e.g. "111111111111111111111111111111111.22"
                    last_err_code = 4;
                    return 0;
                }

            } else if (!has_integer) {
                // ".123"
                last_err_code = 2;
                return 0;
            } else {
                // "123.456"
                if (dec_num < (double)1e-10) {
                    // There are too many decimals, ignore the following decimals
                } else {
                    decimal += (*str - '0') * dec_num;
                    dec_num *= 0.1;
                }
            }

        } else if (*str == '.') {

            if (has_dot) {
                // e.g. "123...456"
                last_err_code = 3;
                return 0;
            }
            has_dot = 1;

        } else {
            // e.g. "123fgh?.456"
            last_err_code = 1;
            return 0;
        }

        str++;
    }

    if (has_dot && (!has_integer || dec_num == 0.1)) {
        // e.g. ".123" or "123." or "."
        last_err_code = 2;
        return 0;
    }

    free(pstr_copy);

    float ret = (float) integer + (float)decimal;
    return ret * sign;
}

int main()
{
    const struct TestCase {
        const char *str;
        const float ret;
        int last_err_code;
    } test_cases[] = {
        // last_err_code != 0
        { "abc", 0, 1 },
        { "123+.456", 0, 1 },
        { "++123.456", 0, 1 },

        { ".", 0, 2 },
        { ".123", 0, 2 },
        { "123.", 0, 2 },

        { "123..456", 0, 3 },
        { "123.4.56", 0, 3 },

        // Case #8:
        { "1111111111111111111111111111111.456", 0, 4 },

        // last_err_code == 0
        { "", 0, 0 },
        { "123.456", 123.456, 0 },
        // There are too many decimals
        { "1.12345678901234567890", 1.12345678, 0 },
    };

    int errors = 0;

    for (int iii = 0; iii < sizeof(test_cases) / sizeof(TestCase); iii++) {
        const TestCase &tc = test_cases[iii];
        // Clear last_err_code
        last_err_code = 0;
        const float actual_ret = str_to_float(tc.str);

        if (tc.ret != actual_ret || last_err_code != tc.last_err_code) {

            errors++;

            cout << "Case #" << iii << ": FAILED" <<  endl;
            cout << "\tExpected ret=" << tc.ret << endl;
            cout << "\tAcutal   ret=" << actual_ret << endl;
            cout << "\tExpected last_err_code=" << tc.last_err_code << endl;
            cout << "\tAcutal   last_err_code=" << last_err_code << endl;
        }
    }

    if (errors == 0)
        cout << "All test passed!" << endl;
    else
        cout << "There are " << errors << " cases failed." << endl;

    return 0;
}
1
  • It is a bad idea to accumulate the result in a double, since every time you add decimal += (*str - '0') * dec_num, there is a new roundoff error added (and binary floats are really poor at representing negative powers of ten). If you keep integers, you will only divide once and the result will be within 1 ULP of the true value. Also, strdup() can fail and it is an overkill just because of eating space -- why not just keep begin and end pointers? Finally, ".123" is perfectly valid. I actually used that form a lot at some point.
    – the swine
    Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 7:44
0
#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
float myAtoF(char *);
//int myAtoI(char);
void main(int argc,char **argv)
{
float res;
char str[10];
if(argc<2)
{
    printf("Supply a floating point Data\n");
    return;
}
printf("argv[1] = %s\n",argv[1]);
//  strcpy(str,argv[1]);
//  printf("str = %s\n",str);
    res=myAtoF(argv[1]);
    printf("Res = %f\n",res);
   }
float myAtoF(char *str)
{
    printf("str = %s\n",str);
    int i,sum,total,index;
    float res;
    if(!strchr(str,'.'))
    {
        printf("Supply only real Data\n");
        return ;
    }
    i=0;
    while(str[i])
    {
        if(!str[i]>='0'&&str[i]<='9')
        {
            printf("Wrong Data Supplied\n");
            return;    

        }
        if(str[i]=='.')
        { 
            index=i;
            i++;
            continue;

        }
        total=str[i]-48;
        if(i==0)
        {
            sum=total;
            i++;
            continue;
        }
        sum=sum*10+total;
        i++;
    }
    printf("Integer Data : %d\n",sum);
    index=(strlen(str)-1)-index;
    printf("index : %d\n",index);
    res=sum;
    for(i=1;i<=index;i++)
    {
        res=(float)res/10;
    }
    return res;
}
0
double atof(char* num)
 {
     if (!num || !*num)
         return 0; 
     double integerPart = 0;
     double fractionPart = 0;
     int divisorForFraction = 1;
     int sign = 1;
     bool inFraction = false;
     /*Take care of +/- sign*/
     if (*num == '-')
     {
         ++num;
         sign = -1;
     }
     else if (*num == '+')
     {
         ++num;
     }
     while (*num != '\0')
     {
         if (*num >= '0' && *num <= '9')
         {
             if (inFraction)
             {
                 /*See how are we converting a character to integer*/
                 fractionPart = fractionPart*10 + (*num - '0');
                 divisorForFraction *= 10;
             }
             else
             {
                 integerPart = integerPart*10 + (*num - '0');
             }
         }
         else if (*num == '.')
         {
             if (inFraction)
                 return sign * (integerPart + fractionPart/divisorForFraction);
             else
                 inFraction = true;
         }
         else
         {
             return sign * (integerPart + fractionPart/divisorForFraction);
         }
         ++num;
     }
     return sign * (integerPart + fractionPart/divisorForFraction);
 }
1
  • While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion.
    – J. Chomel
    Commented Jan 11, 2017 at 11:52
0

My solution:

float str2float (const char * str) {
  unsigned char abc;
  float ret = 0, fac = 1;
  for (abc = 9; abc & 1; str++) {
    abc  =  *str == '-' ?
              (abc & 6 ? abc & 14 : (abc & 47) | 36)
            : *str == '+' ?
              (abc & 6 ? abc & 14 : (abc & 15) | 4)
            : *str > 47 && *str < 58 ?
              abc | 18
            : (abc & 8) && *str == '.' ?
              (abc & 39) | 2
            : !(abc & 2) && (*str == ' ' || *str == '\t') ?
              (abc & 47) | 1
            :
              abc & 46;
    if (abc & 16) {
      ret = abc & 8 ? *str - 48 + ret * 10 : (*str - 48) / (fac *= 10) + ret;
    }
  }
  return abc & 32 ? -ret : ret;
}

Test it

printf("%f\n", str2float("234.3432435543")); // 234.343246
printf("%f\n", str2float("+234.3432435543")); // 234.343246
printf("%f\n", str2float("-234.3432435543")); // -234.343246
printf("%f\n", str2float("   +  234.3432435543")); // 234.343246
printf("%f\n", str2float(".5")); // 0.500000
printf("%f\n", str2float("- .5")); // -0.500000

Btw, in case anyone needs it, here is also my solution to convert a string to an integer:

int str2int (const char *str) {
  unsigned char abc;
  int ret = 0;
  for (abc = 1; abc & 1; str++) {
    abc  =  *str == '-' ?
              (abc & 6 ? abc & 6 : (abc & 23) | 20)
            : *str == '+' ?
              (abc & 6 ? abc & 6 : (abc & 7) | 4)
            : *str > 47 && *str < 58 ?
              abc | 10
            : !(abc & 2) && (*str == ' ' || *str == '\t') ?
               (abc & 23) | 1
            :
              abc & 22;
    if (abc & 8) {
      ret = ret * 10 + *str - 48;
    }
  }
  return abc & 16 ? -ret : ret;
}
5
  • What have you gained by abusing the ternary operator? The innermost ones are fine, but the outer ones are pointless and take longer to reason about than the equivalent if/else chain. Commented Oct 2, 2017 at 18:56
  • The ternary operator is just another way of obtaining the same result, with the same performance and with a better clarity of the code (in this way you know that the conditions are all focused on assigning a value to the variable abc, with an if/else statement you have to read the whole block for being sure about it). What would I have gained without it?
    – madmurphy
    Commented Oct 2, 2017 at 22:49
  • I guess we just have different ideas about readability then... This looks like it was written by someone who just learned how to use the ternary operator :P Commented Oct 3, 2017 at 3:07
  • Well… My code uses a bitmask, and without a comment that explains how the flags are structured the code above can never be really “readable”, I think, independently of you write the if/else chain.
    – madmurphy
    Commented Oct 3, 2017 at 20:19
  • 1
    True. (comment padding) Commented Oct 4, 2017 at 19:14
-1
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include<string.h>


double myatof(char *num);
int main(void)
{
    double res;char str[15];

    printf("enter a number in the form of a  string:\n");
    gets(str);
    res=myatof(str);
    printf("Float representation of above number  is %f\n",res);
    return 0;
}

double myatof(char *str)
{
    int i=0;int len1,len2,j;
    float num=0.0;float num1=0.0; float num2=0.0;

    do
    {
        if((str[i++]=='.'))
        {
            len1=i-1;len2=-((strlen(str)-1)-(i-1));

            for(int p=0,q=(len1-1);p<len1,q>=0;p++,q--)
            {
                num1+=((str[p]-'0')*pow(10,q));
            }
            for(int r=len1+1,s=-1;r<strlen(str),s>=len2;r++,s--)
            {
                num2+=((str[r]-'0')*pow(10,s));
            }
        }
    }while(str[i]!='\0');

    num=num1+num2;
    printf("%f\t",num1);
    printf("%f\t",num2);
    return num;
}
1
  • The above code won't work for -ve (negative) numbers
    – sai srikar
    Commented Mar 17, 2018 at 9:15

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